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Pfizer CEO tests positive for COVID-19 for a second time

Pfizer Inc Chief Executive Officer Albert Bourla said on Saturday he had tested positive for COVID-19.
"I’m feeling well and symptom free," Bourla said in a statement.
Bourla, 60, back in August had contacted COVID and had started a course of the company's oral COVID-19 antiviral treatment, Paxlovid.
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Another discount airline takes off — but they may not all survive

Hriday Balachandran enjoyed his recent trip to Vancouver so much on discount airline Lynx Air that he just booked tickets to Kelowna, B.C., for the Thanksgiving weekend.
It was the Calgarian's first time flying with the airline and the ticket price was the main selling point — about $100 round trip.
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July travel on an upward trend, but is still a fraction of pre-pandemic levels

Statistics Canada says the number of Canada's international arrivals increased in July but has yet to recover to pre-pandemic levels.
The agency says the number of trips by U.S. residents in July was 2.2 million, 11 times the number of trips taken in July 2021 but still about 60 per cent of the trips reported in July 2019.
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More than half of younger Canadians need an inheritance for financial goals: survey

Pollara Strategic Insights surveyed 1,517 adult Canadians between Aug. 15 and 16, to better understand their money transfer habits since the start of the pandemic.
It found that 25 per cent of Canadians aged 18 to 34 had either received or given a financial inheritance since March 2020, compared to the national average across all age groups of 14 per cent.
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University of Cambridge says it gained from slave trade

Britain's University of Cambridge said on Thursday it had benefited from the proceeds of slavery over its history, and promised to expand scholarships for Black students and fund more research into the murderous trade.
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McDonald's must face US$10 billion racial discrimination suit from media group

McDonald's will have to defend itself against a US$10 billion lawsuit from media mogul Byron Allen over an allegation that the fast food chain doesn't advertise with Black-owned media.
A federal court ruled last week said that Allen and his company, Allen Media Group, can try to prove in court that McDonald's violated civil rights laws.
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Statistics Canada says retail sales fell 2.5 per cent to $61.3 billion in July

Statistics Canada says retail sales fell 2.5 per cent to $61.3 billion in July, the first drop in seven months as sales at gasoline stations and clothing and clothing accessories stores decreased.
However, the agency says its initial estimate for August pointed to a gain of 0.4 per cent for the month, but noted the figure will be revised.
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TSX slumps as oil falls below $80 and economic gloom settles in

Canada's benchmark stock index dropped heavily on Friday as prospects of a global recession cause investors to sell first and ask questions later.
The S&P/TSX Composite Index was off by more than 500 points or more than three per cent to just below 18,500 in the afternoon, dragged down by a plunge in the price of oil.
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Retail sales fall for 1st time this year as consumers start to tap out

Facing sky-high inflation, consumers put away their wallets more often in July, new data revealed Friday, as retail sales fell for the first time since 2021.
Canadian retailers rang up $61.3 billion in sales in July, Statistics Canada reported Friday.
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Court upholds sharing of Canadian bank account info with U.S. authorities

The Federal Court of Appeal has affirmed the constitutionality of legislation that allows account information held by Canadian financial institutions to be shared with U.S. authorities.
Two U.S.-born women who now live in Canada, Gwendolyn Louise Deegan and Kazia Highton, challenged the Canadian provisions implementing a 2014 agreement between the two countries that makes the information-sharing possible.
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Consumers pull back on shopping as inflation and rate hikes settle in

Facing sky-high inflation, consumers put away their wallets more often in July, new data revealed Friday, as retail sales fell for the first time since 2021.
Canadian retailers rang up $61.3 billion in sales in July, Statistics Canada reported Friday.
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Court of Appeal upholds sharing of Canadian bank account info with U.S. authorities

The Federal Court of Appeal has affirmed the constitutionality of legislation that allows account information held by Canadian financial institutions to be shared with U.S. authorities.
Two U.S.-born women who now live in Canada, Gwendolyn Louise Deegan and Kazia Highton, challenged the Canadian provisions implementing a 2014 agreement between the two countries that makes the information-sharing possible.
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U.K. slashes personal, corporate taxes in bid to spur growth

Britain's new government on Friday announced a sweeping plan of tax cuts it said would be funded by borrowing and revenues generated by anticipated growth, as part of contentious moves to combat the cost-of-living crisis and bolster a faltering economy.
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