Sanders is surprise winner in Michigan as Trump takes two primaries

ANSING, Mich. β€” Bernie Sanders breathed new life into his long-shot White House bid with a crucial win in Michigan's primary Tuesday night, chipping away at Hillary Clinton's dominance in the Democratic presidential race.

See Full Article

Republican Donald Trump swept to victory in both Michigan and Mississippi, overcoming fierce efforts to blunt his momentum.

Even with Sanders' win, Clinton and Trump moved closer to a general election face-off. Clinton breezed to an easy victory in Mississippi, propelled by overwhelming support from black voters, and she now has more than half the delegates she needs to clinch the Democratic nomination. Trump, too, padded his lead over Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, his closest rival.

The front-runners turned their sights on November as they reveled in their wins.

"We are better than what we are being offered by the Republicans," Clinton declared.

In a nod toward the kind of traditional politics he's shunned, Trump emphasized the importance of helping Republican senators and House members get elected in the fall. Having entered Tuesday's contests facing a barrage of criticism from rival candidates and outside groups, he also delighted in overcoming the attacks.

"Every single person who has attacked me has gone down," Trump said at one of his Florida resorts. He was flanked by tables packed with his retail products, including steaks, bottled water and wine, and defended his business record more thoroughly than he outlined his policy proposals for the country.

Sanders, meanwhile, said Michigan signaled that his campaign "is strong in every part of the country, and frankly we believe our strongest areas are yet to happen."

While a handful of recent losses to Cruz have raised questions about Trump's durability, Tuesday's contests marked another lost opportunity for rivals desperate to stop his march to the nomination. Next week's winner-take-all contests in Ohio and Florida loom large as perhaps the last chance to block him short of a contested convention fight.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich was in a fight with Cruz for second place in Michigan and hoping a good showing would give him a boost heading into next week's crucial contest in his home state.

For Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, a favorite of Republican elected officials, Tuesday marked the latest in a series of disappointing nights. He emerged from Michigan and Mississippi with no new delegates.

Rubio insisted he would press on to his home state's primary in Florida next Tuesday.

"It has to happen here, and it has to happen now," Rubio told supporters during a rally in Sarasota.

If Rubio and Kasich can't win at home, the GOP primary appears set to become a two-person race between Trump and Cruz. The Texas senator is sticking close in the delegate count, and with six states in his win column he's argued he's the only candidate standing between the brash billionaire and the GOP nomination.

During a campaign stop at a North Carolina church, Cruz took on Trump for asking rally attendees to pledge their allegiance to him. He said the move struck him as "profoundly wrong" and was something "kings and queens demand" of their subjects.

Some mainstream Republicans have cast both Trump and Cruz as unelectable in a November face-off with the Democratic nominee. But they're quickly running out of options β€” and candidates β€”to prevent one of the men from becoming the GOP standard-bearer.

Republicans were also holding contests Tuesday in Hawaii and Idaho.

The economy ranked high on the list of concerns for voters in Michigan and Mississippi. At least 8 in 10 in each party's primary said they were worried about where the American economy is heading, according to exit polls conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks.

Among Democrats, 8 in 10 voters in both states said the country's economic system benefits the wealthy, not all Americans.

Sanders has sought to tap into that concern, energizing young people and white, blue-collar voters with his calls for breaking up Wall Street banks and making tuition free at public colleges and universities. Michigan, with big college towns and a sizeable population of working-class voters, was a good fit for him, though something of a surprise victory given that Clinton had led in polls heading into Tuesday's voting.

Still, Sanders has struggled mightily with black voters who are crucial to Democrats in the general election. In Mississippi, black voters comprised about two-thirds of the Democratic electorate and nearly 9 in 10 backed Clinton.

After Tuesday's results, Clinton has accumulated 1,134 delegates and Sanders 502, including superdelegates. Democrats need 2,383 delegates to win the nomination.

With Tuesday's wins, Trump leads the Republican field with 428 delegates, followed by Cruz with 315, Rubio with 151 and Kasich with 52. Winning the GOP nomination requires 1,237 delegates.

-----

Associated Press writers Emily Wagster Pettus in Jackson, Mississippi, Kathleen Ronayne in Monroe, Michigan, and Steve Peoples in Sarasota, Florida, contributed to this report.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • South Korea raises ferry that sank three years ago

    World News CTV News
    SEOUL, Korea, Republic Of - A 6,800-ton South Korean ferry emerged from the water on Thursday, nearly three years after it capsized and sank into violent seas off the country's southwestern coast, an emotional moment for the country that continues to search for closure to one of its deadliest disasters ever. Source
  • Parents delayed help for wounded boy to scrub evidence, police say

    World News CTV News
    PHOENIX - The parents of a 9-year-old boy who was shot in the head in their Phoenix home put off calling 911 as they cleaned up evidence in multiple rooms of the house, police said Wednesday, calling it a case that "shocks your conscience. Source
  • Afghanistan hoping U.S. sends thousands more troops

    World News CBC News
    Afghanistan wants the United States to send more forces to help meet shortfalls in the battle against the Taliban and the Islamic State group, the nation's top diplomat said Tuesday. Foreign Minister Salahuddin Rabbani welcomed a recent call by U.S. Source
  • Coroner's jury wants better mental health support for Vancouver transit police

    Canada News CTV News
    BURNABY, B.C. - A coroner's jury is recommending that transit police in the Vancouver area work more closely with mental health providers following the death of a man who repeatedly stabbed himself and was shot by an officer at a grocery store more than two years ago. Source
  • Liberal budget offers lots of 'vision' but few new numbers: Aaron Wherry

    Canada News CBC News
    At a dozen points in the budget document, the Liberals interrupt their announcements to explain "What Success Will Look Like." Canada, we are told at one point, "will have one of the most skilled, talented, creative and diverse workforces in the world. Source
  • U.S. veteran randomly targeted black man in fatal stabbing, NYC police allege

    World News CBC News
    A white U.S. Army veteran from Baltimore bent on making a racist attack took a bus to New York, the "media capital of the world," randomly picked out a black man who was collecting bottles on the street and killed him with a sword, police said Wednesday. Source
  • Colin Dexter, author of Inspector Morse detective series, dead at 86

    World News CBC News
    Colin Dexter, the unassuming British writer who created curmudgeonly, music-loving Oxford detective Inspector Morse, has died aged 86. Publisher Pan Macmillan said Dexter died Tuesday at his home in Oxford, southern England. Macmillan publisher Jeremy Trevathan said Dexter "represented the absolute epitome of British crime writing. Source
  • Steady fall in suicides offers glimmer of hope in Japan

    World News CTV News
    TOKYO -- Fewer Japanese are taking their own lives, a positive sign in a country with one of the world's highest suicide rates. The Health Ministry said Thursday that 21,897 people committed suicide in 2016, down from more than 30,000 in 2011 and the lowest number since 1994. Source
  • Terrorism knows no bounds

    World News Toronto Sun
    As the frightening footage unfolds from London, how it brings back grim memories of the terror attack on our own Parliament Hill almost three years ago. A man in uniform attacked and killed by a terrorist determined to breach the heart of our government, to defile the centre of our democracy. Source
  • Take that! Pyongyang lambastes Trump as too much like Obama

    World News CTV News
    TOKYO -- North Korea has a criticism of U.S. President Donald Trump he probably wasn't expecting: He's too much like Barack Obama. North Korea's state media, which regularly vilified Obama in the strongest terms, had been slow to do the same with the Trump administration, possibly so that officials in Pyongyang could figure out what direction Trump will likely take and what new policies he may pursue. Source