Time running out to charge anyone who helped 'Whitey' Bulger

BOSTON -- Investigators who spent years building a criminal case against gangster James "Whitey" Bulger have long believed he had multiple helpers when he fled Boston and went on the run.

See Full Article

But if prosecutors don't bring charges within the next few months, the only person to be charged with actually assisting the notorious crime boss during his 16 years as a fugitive will be his longtime girlfriend.

The statute of limitations for harbouring a fugitive is five years. The clock began ticking when Bulger was captured in Santa Monica, California, on June 22, 2011, and runs out on June 22, 2016.

Catherine Greig, who accompanied Bulger on his long flight from justice, was sentenced to eight years in prison for helping him.

Greig faces additional prison time after pleading guilty last month to contempt for refusing to testify before a grand jury investigating who else may have helped Bulger.

Now the question is, without Greig's help, will anyone else ever be charged?

"I don't think the chances are great. I'd be happy to see it, but I'd be surprised to see it," said retired state police Col. Thomas Foley, who spent two decades pursuing Bulger.

Bulger, now 86, is serving a life sentence after being convicted of a litany of crimes during a 2013 racketeering trial, including participating in 11 murders.

Over the years, investigators suspected Bulger received help from his family, and attention focused on his brother, William Bulger, a powerful political figure who was president of the state Senate for 17 years.

But William Bulger has denied helping his brother while he was a fugitive and has never been charged. In testimony before a federal grand jury in 2001, William Bulger acknowledged that he and his brother spoke by phone shortly after he fled Boston in late 1994. William Bulger also acknowledged that he did not encourage his brother to surrender.

"I don't feel an obligation to help everyone catch him," he said, according to leaked transcripts of testimony published in The Boston Globe.

Another brother, John "Jackie" Bulger, pleaded guilty to perjury and obstruction of justice in 2003 for lying to federal grand juries. Jackie Bulger admitted he had spoken to his brother while he was a fugitive. He also admitted lying when he testified he had no knowledge about a safe deposit box owned by his brother.

Greig's twin sister, Margaret McCusker, pleaded guilty to lying to a grand jury about having contact with her sister after she fled Boston with Bulger.

Kevin Weeks, a key Bulger henchman, admitted that he provided Bulger with fake identification while he was on the run. Weeks, who testified against Bulger, served five years in prison for being an accessory to five murders, but was not charged with helping Bulger as a fugitive.

Although the statute of limitations on the harbouring charge ends in June, prosecutors could potentially have more time to bring a different charge. If, for example, Bulger had assets hidden and someone moved them after his arrest in 2011, that person could potentially be charged with obstruction of justice. The statute of limitations would begin running on the date the assets were moved.

Or, if someone lied to the grand jury after Bulger's arrest, that person could be charged with perjury for up to five years. Likewise, if someone lied to the FBI after Bulger's arrest, that person could be charged with making a false statement to a federal agent.

With Greig refusing to testify, another key question could remain unanswered: where is the money investigators believe Bulger hid?

While Bulger was a fugitive, the FBI seized cash and other items from safe deposit boxes in Florida, London, Canada and Ireland. But investigators believe that was just a fraction of the money Bulger made through his gang's illegal activities.

"I think the general belief was yeah, he had money stashed all over the place," said Tom Duffy, a retired state police trooper.

When Bulger and Greig were captured, authorities found $822,000 in cash in their apartment.

Prosecutors have said they will divide that among the families of Bulger's victims.

Patricia Donahue, whose husband was killed by Bulger and another man in 1982, said she has little hope any more money will be distributed to Bulger's victims.

"I'm sure there is probably money stashed out there somewhere, but I don't think we'll see it," she said.


Latest Canada & World News

  • Betsy Bloomingdale private collection going to auction

    World News CTV News
    NEW YORK -- Personal belongings of the late fashion icon, socialite and philanthropist Betsy Bloomingdale will be auctioned in New York later this year and next year. Bloomingdale, who was married to the late Alfred S. Source
  • Dangerous roads: 18 pedestrians struck, 1 killed in Toronto Thursday

    Canada News CTV News
    It was a tragic day on the roads Thursday in Toronto after 18 pedestrians were struck by vehicles, including one senior who later died. By noon on Thursday, 10 pedestrians had been hit by vehicles on Toronto roads, with more collisions occurring in the evening hours. Source
  • Ontario to import Quebec electricity under 7-year deal

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO -- Ontario and Quebec will sign a new seven-year electricity agreement today when the two governments hold a joint cabinet meeting in Toronto. The Canadian Press has learned Premiers Kathleen Wynne and Philippe Couillard will sign the deal, which will see Ontario import up to two terawatt hours of electricity from Quebec each year, enough to power a city the size of Kitchener, Ont. Source
  • Inflation inches up to 1.3% despite cheaper food

    Canada News CBC News
    The cost of living in Canada went up by 1.3 per cent in the year ended in September, up from 1.1 per cent the previous month. Statistics Canada reported Friday that food prices were the biggest cause of the deceleration, as the food index posted its smallest year-over-year gain since February 2000. Source
  • Spend more on affordable housing, wipe out homelessness: Report

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    OTTAWA — A new report on homelessness proposes nearly doubling federal spending on affordable housing over the next 10 years to effectively eliminate the problem. Two groups — the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness and the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness say — that would effectively make homelessness rare, brief and non-recurring. Source
  • Polish minister claims Egypt sold warships to Russia for symbolic price of $1

    World News CTV News
    WARSAW, Poland - Poland's defence minister says he believes Egypt has sold two French-made Mistral warships to Russia for the symbolic price of $1. Antoni Macierewicz made the claim during a parliamentary debate on Thursday and later told reporters he had the information "from good sources" but did not reveal any other details. Source
  • 'I'm petrified': Cape Breton braces for more rainfall after severe flooding

    Canada News CTV News
    Parts of Atlantic Canada are bracing for heavy rainfall this weekend as Cape Breton continues to clean up from a severe Thanksgiving weekend storm that flooded hundreds of homes. Environment Canada has issued special weather statements about heavy rainfall in New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador and Nova Scotia. Source
  • Woman addresses gender gap issue to Commons committee — of all men

    Canada News CBC News
    When Jenny Wright addressed the Federal Standing Committee on Finance recently in Charlottetown, she was addressing a group of men. That surprised Wright, the executive director of the St. John's Status of Women Council, who was there to talk about economic equality for women. Source
  • Typhoon Haima lashes China; death toll up in Philippines [Photos]

    World News Toronto Sun
    VIGAN, Philippines — Super Typhoon Haima weakened and blew out to sea Thursday after smashing the northern Philippines with ferocious wind and rain overnight. Flooding, landslides and power outages were evident, but large casualties appeared to have been averted after nearly 100,000 people fled to safer ground. Source
  • Still no aid for Aleppo's sick, hungry and wounded despite Russian pause in bombing

    World News CBC News
    The United Nations said medical evacuations from eastern Aleppo had not begun on Friday as it had hoped, as a lack of security guarantees and "facilitation" prevent aid workers taking advantage of a pause in the bombing announced by Russia. Source