China's president pledges to contain moves toward formal Taiwan independence

BEIJING -- China's President Xi Jinping has pledged to contain any moves by Taiwan toward formal independence in his first public remarks on the issue since the self-governing island democracy elected a president and legislature from the independence-leaning party in January.

See Full Article

Speaking to delegates to the annual meeting of China's ceremonial parliament, Xi said China won't budge in its insistence that Taiwan recognize it is part of China, regardless of political changes on the island of 23 million.

"We will resolutely contain Taiwan independence secessionist activities in any form," Xi was quoted as saying by the official Xinhua News Agency at their meeting Saturday. "We will safeguard the country's sovereignty and territorial integrity, and never allow the historical tragedy of national secession to happen again."

The landslide election of Tsai Ing-wen as president, along with a legislative majority for her Democratic Progressive Party, has thrown a question mark over the future of relations between the sides.

Tsai, who won't be inaugurated until May, takes over from China-friendly Nationalist Party President Ma Ying-jeou, who oversaw the signing of a series of agreements during his eight years in power establishing closer economic ties between the sides.

A Japanese colony for 50 years, Taiwan was reabsorbed by China in 1945, but then split apart again after Chiang Kai-shek's defeated Nationalists moved their government to the island in 1949 after the Communist seizure of power on the mainland.

China continues to view the island as a breakaway province to be recovered by force if necessary.

In his remarks, Xi reiterated China's self-declared bottom line that Taiwan's government must accept a 1992 formulation agreeing that Taiwan is part of China. Tsai has said she wants the status-quo of peace and stability between the sides, but has so far withheld her endorsement of the so-called '92 consensus.

"Our policy toward Taiwan is clear and consistent, and it will not change along with the change in Taiwan's political situation," Xi was quoted as telling the delegates.

Apart from occasional criticism in state media, China has largely held its fire regarding Tsai's election.

In his main policy address to the congress on Saturday, Premier Li Keqiang made no mention of Taiwan's elections, but said China would stick to its major policies on Taiwan and wants to maintain "the peaceful growth of cross-strait relations and safeguard peace and stability in the Taiwan strait."



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Mudslinging continues as B.C. election nears halfway mark

    Canada News CTV News
    VANCOUVER - Leaders of British Columbia's main political parties are continuing to take shots at each other's election promises and past performances as the campaign nears the halfway mark. NDP Leader John Horgan hosted a campaign rally in Vancouver on Sunday, where he told the crowd that Liberal Leader Christy Clark is working for her donors, not for the average British Columbian. Source
  • South Korea, allies brace for North Korea follow-up act

    World News CTV News
    SEOUL, Korea, Republic Of -- Fresh off an immense North Korean parade that revealed an arsenal of intercontinental ballistic missiles, rival South Korea and its allies are bracing for the possibility that Pyongyang's follow-up act will be even bigger. Source
  • 'This is where I want to be': Canadian woman on fighting ISIS in Syria

    World News CTV News
    A B.C. fashion model-turned-freedom fighter is speaking out about her decision to rejoin the fight against ISIS in Syria. Hanna Bohman, 48, has travelled to Syria twice. She returned to Vancouver in June, 2016 after rejoining other foreigners in a faction of Kurdish fighters. Source
  • N.L. fisherman's hunger strike ends in hospitalization

    Canada News CTV News
    A Newfoundland fisherman’s hunger strike ended Sunday with an ambulance taking him to hospital, though his supporters say their fight is far from finished. “I almost lost my son there today,” Richard Gillett’s father, John Gillett, told reporters on Sunday. Source
  • Venezuelans struggling in U.S. as home country implodes

    World News CTV News
    MIAMI -- People crowd outside a church near Miami's international airport, chatting about family and friends left behind in Caracas, Valencia and Maracaibo as they wait more than an hour to receive rice, beans, yogurt and other food for their families. Source
  • Changes at passport offices due to terrorism concerns

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    OTTAWA — The federal government has been quietly making changes to passport offices in a bid to improve security and address concerns that the facilities could be easy targets for a terrorist attack. Civil servants in passport and other government offices have for years faced bomb threats, and hostility from individuals who are disgruntled, drunk or suffering mental illnesses. Source
  • Student killed during hammer throw at track meet

    World News Toronto Sun
    WHEATON, Ill. — A college student has died after being struck during a hammer-throw event at a track meet in suburban Chicago. Wheaton College officials say 19-year-old student Ethan Roser of Cincinnati was volunteering at a track and field competition at the school Saturday when he was accidentally struck by a hammer. Source
  • Obama meets with at-risk youth ahead of Chicago speech

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Former President Barack Obama met Sunday with at-risk young men and boys in his hometown of Chicago before his first major post-presidency speech. The former president spent time at a roundtable with youth from theorganization Chicago Create Real Economic Destiny located in the Roseland/Pullman neighbourhood in South Side Chicago where Obama started as a community organizer at age 25. Source
  • Police stop 12-year-old boy from driving across Australia

    World News Toronto Sun
    SYDNEY, Australia — Outback police have arrested a 12-year-old boy who was almost a third of his way toward driving solo across Australia. The unlicensed boy had driven more than 1,300 kilometres (800 miles) from his home in Kendall on the east coast when he was stopped by traffic police on Saturday on the Barrier Highway near the remote mining town of Broken Hill because a bumper bar was dragging on the road, a police statement said on Sunday. Source
  • Police stop 12-year-old boy who drove 1,300 km across Australia

    World News CTV News
    SYDNEY, Australia - Outback police have arrested a 12-year-old boy who was almost a third of his way toward driving solo across Australia. A police statement said on Sunday the unlicensed boy had driven more than 1,300 kilometres from his home in Kendall on the east coast when was stopped by traffic police on Saturday on the Barrier Highway near the mining town of Broken Hill because a bumper bar was dragging on the road. Source