Five more U.S. states take turn in White House race

WASHINGTON — Five more states were taking their turns Saturday in the 2016 presidential race with caucuses and primaries largely overshadowed by Super Tuesday and potentially make-or-break contests soon to come.

See Full Article

"After making this huge U-turn to Kansas, if I lose, I'm going to be so angry at you," Republican front-runner Donald Trump told a crowd in Wichita, getting in one last Kansas stop just before the state's caucuses.

"You're going to see us win, win, win," said the billionaire businessman, who ditched a conference of conservatives in the Washington area — a snub that organizers said "sends a clear message to conservatives."

Trump, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Ohio Gov. John Kasich were competing in Maine, Kansas, Kentucky and Louisiana. Democrats Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders faced off in Nebraska, Kansas and Louisiana.

Trump's rivals are increasingly questioning his commitment to conservative policies and saying that his promise to be flexible on issues is a warning flag.

"Donald is telling us he will betray us on everything he's campaigned on," Cruz said Friday in Maine.

With the GOP race in chaos, establishment figures frantically are looking for any way to stop Trump, perhaps at a contested convention if none of the candidates can roll up the 1,237 delegates needed to snag the nomination.

"The Republicans are eating their own. They've got to be very careful," Trump said in Wichita. "We have to bring things together."

A Trump backer had a stern warning for those trying to block the Trump juggernaut: "If the big, fat GOP don't like him, they don't like me," said 65-year-old Connie Belton, a retired homemaker from Wichita.

Going into Saturday's voting, Trump led with 329 delegates. Cruz had 231, Rubio 110 and Kasich 25. In all, 155 GOP delegates were at stake in Saturday's races.

The rules for the latest round of voting made it easier for candidates to claim a share of the delegates than was true in some Super Tuesday states, when Trump rolled up seven wins to three for Cruz, including in his home state, and one for Rubio.

Rubio is going all-out for victory in Florida on March 15, and was to campaign in Jacksonville on Saturday afternoon after a stop at the conservatives' meeting outside the nation's capital. Cruz's schedule had him in Kansas and Idaho, which votes Tuesday. Kasich is focusing on Michigan, also a Tuesday contest, and Ohio, which holds its primary March 15, as he looks for political survival with victories in the Mideast.

"Let's Uberize the federal government, the state government and local government and make them work for us. Make them give us better services at lower prices," he said to cheers in Traverse City, Michigan, on Saturday.

Praising the ride-hailing company, he said, "I'm saying to myself, 'Why did I not think that up, become a billionaire and self-fund this campaign?"

On the Democratic side, Clinton has outpaced Sanders with 1,066 delegates to his 432, including pledged superdelegates — members of Congress, governors and party officials who can support the candidate of their choice. It takes 2,383 delegates to win the Democratic nomination. There were 109 at stake on Saturday.

Ahead of a debate Sunday night in Flint, Michigan, Clinton met with about 20 African-American ministers in Detroit on Saturday and said "the future" of the Supreme Court was on the ballot in November's general election.

Clinton urged the GOP-controlled Senate, where she once represented New York, to do its constitutional duty and "make a decision" about any nominee President Barack Obama may submit to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia. Republican leaders say they will not consider a nominee and will leave that choice to the next president.

Her criticism of Republicans on that issue and their opposition to restoring a key part of the Voting Rights Act wasn't new, but allowed her convey her message to an important constituency in the majority-black city.

Sanders had events in Ohio on Saturday as the Democrats kept close watch on those two big states and their upcoming delegate hauls.

One ironic twist to Saturday's voting was the backstory to the GOP contest in Kentucky.

The caucus was created so Kentucky's Rand Paul could run for president and re-election to the Senate without violating a state law banning candidates from appearing on the ballot twice in one day.

Even though Paul is long gone from the presidential race, he's still on the hook to pay $250,000 plus other expenses for a caucus that will choose between four people not named Paul.

Associated Press writers Rebecca Santana in New Orleans; David Sharp in Portland, Maine; Bruce Schreiner in Frankfort, Kentucky; John Hanna in Topeka, Kansas; and Margery Beck in Omaha, Nebraska, contributed to this report.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • A Big House for retirement: Ont. man to live in converted N.B. jail

    Canada News CTV News
    DORCHESTER, N.B. - An Ontario garbage worker has decided to retire to the Big House -- a defunct New Brunswick jail with a history of hangings. Bill Steele of Oshawa just bought the former jail in Dorchester -- listed for $159,900 -- which was decommissioned more than 20 years ago and features 15 original cells. Source
  • ACLU, Georgia battle over 'Allah' last name for toddler

    World News CTV News
    ATLANTA -- A civil rights group sued Georgia over the state's refusal to allow a couple to officially name its 22-month-old child "Allah." The American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia filed the lawsuit recently in Fulton County Superior Court on behalf of the couple, Elizabeth Handy and Bilal Walk. Source
  • U.S. stocks lower as 'Trump trade' runs out of steam

    World News CBC News
    The three-month rally in stock markets ran out of a little steam on Monday on worries that the Trump White House may not be able to push through as many changes to business regulations as once thought. Source
  • Family pays tribute to American slain in London terror attack

    World News CTV News
    LONDON -- The family of an American slain in last week's terror attack in London expressed gratitude for the kindness of strangers on Monday, offering hope and resolve that some good would result from the tragedy. Source
  • Kushner agrees to speak to Senate panel about Russia

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- U.S. President Donald Trump's son-in-law has volunteered to answer questions before the Senate Intelligence Committee about arranging meetings with the Russian ambassador and other officials, the White House confirmed Monday. Jared Kushner has agreed to speak to the committee, which is conducting an investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 election, including whether there are any ties between Trump associates and the Kremlin, the White House said. Source
  • 'No evidence' London attacker associated with ISIS: police

    World News CTV News
    LONDON -- Police have found no evidence that the man who killed four people in London last week was associated with the Islamic State group or al Qaeda, a senior British counterterrorism officer said Monday. Source
  • London attacker wasn't linked to al-Qaeda or ISIS, police say

    World News CBC News
    A senior British counterterrorism officer says police have found "no evidence" Westminster attacker Khalid Masood was associated with ISIS or al-Qaeda. Deputy assistant commissioner Neil Basu said Masood clearly had "an interest in jihad," but police have no evidence he discussed his attack with others. Source
  • U.S. couple accused of trying to sell baby on Craigslist for $3,000

    World News CTV News
    ELIZABETHTON, Tenn. - Authorities say a Tennessee couple is accused of trying to sell a 5-month-old baby online for $3,000. Local news outlets report that the Greene County Sheriff's Office says 37-year-old Deanna Lynn Greer and 26-year-old John David Cain were arrested Friday on charges of aggravated child abuse and aggravated child neglect or endangerment. Source
  • 5 things we learned about the changing nature of news from The National in Conversation

    Canada News CBC News
    Some of CBC's top journalists and personalities from around the country gathered in Charlottetown on Friday for a panel discussion about the changing nature of news. Peter Mansbridge, CBC's chief correspondent, was the moderator. On the panel were senior correspondent Susan Ormiston, Power & Politics host Rosemary Barton, CBC News Now with Ian Hanomansing host Ian Hanomansing, CBC News: Nova Scotia and East Coast correspondent to The National Tom Murphy, columnist Rex Murphy and This Hour Has…
  • Massive $1M gold Canadian coin stolen in Berlin

    World News CBC News
    Berlin police say thieves broke into the German capital's Bode Museum and made off with a massive 100-kilogram gold coin issued by the Royal Canadian Mint that's worth millions. Dubbed the "Big Maple Leaf" and measuring three-centimetres thick with a diameter of 53 centimetres, the coin has a portrait of the Queen on one side and maple leaves on the other. Source