Ben Carson ends bid for Republican nomination

WASHINGTON -- Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson said he is effectively ending his bid for the White House Wednesday, concluding a roller-coaster campaign that briefly took him to the top of a chaotic GOP field but ended with a Super Tuesday whimper.

See Full Article

"I do not see a political path forward," Carson said in a statement posted on his campaign website, though he added, "I remain deeply committed to my home nation, America" and promised to offer details of his future when he speaks Friday at a conservative conference in Washington.

He did not explicitly say that he's ending his campaign, only noting that he does not plan to take part in Thursday's Fox News debate. But his longtime businessman and friend, Armstrong Williams, confirmed that the soft-spoken candidate would no longer be asking for votes.

"There's only one candidate in this 2016 election on the GOP side, and his name is Trump. That's the reality," Williams said, adding that Sens. Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz also should drop out, as they "also have no path" to the nomination.

Carson's exit reduces the active Republican field to four candidates, though billionaire Donald Trump remains the clear leader in earned delegates and voter preference polls.

Carson, 64, was one of several anti-establishment candidates who shaped the early stages of a Republican race defined by conservatives' wide-ranging disgust with the nation's direction and GOP leaders' perceived inability to alter it.

He ran as an outsider, offering a poverty-to-fame autobiography, his unabashed Christian faith and an unceasing indictment of conventional politics, styling his bid as an effort to combat "political correctness" and what he described as a creep toward "socialism."

That formula fueled a steady climb in the polls and a powerful fundraising effort. But his success also brought intense scrutiny. Carson lashed out publicly at questions about his life story, having to explain anecdotes like his claim to have been offered a "scholarship" to West Point. He made foreign policy flubs, from a mistaken suggestion that China is militarily involved in Syria's civil war, to a high profile speech in which he repeatedly mispronounced the name of the Palestinian political and military organization Hamas.

And he endured public sniping among some of his closest advisers, some of whom contributed to questions about his overall fitness for the job.

The only African-American among the presidential contenders of either major party, Carson announced his bid in May from his native Detroit, where he was raised in a poor neighborhood by a single mother. Though she could not read, Carson said, his mother saw to it that he and his brother received formal educations.

Carson attended Yale University and the University of Michigan Medical School. He earned national acclaim during 29 years leading the pediatric neurosurgery unit of Johns Hopkins Children's Center in Baltimore. He directed the first surgery to separate twins connected at the back of the head. His career was notable enough to inspire the 2009 movie, "Gifted Hands," with actor Cuba Gooding Jr. depicting Carson.

He rose to political prominence with his address at the 2013 National Prayer Breakfast, where he offered a withering critique of the modern welfare state and the nation's overall direction. The speech restated themes from Carson's 2012 book "America the Beautiful," but he excited conservatives by doing so with President Barack Obama sitting just feet away.

He would often tell voters that he viewed his candidacy as a way to honour the American founders' view of the "citizen-statesman."

"If I am successful in this endeavour," he said Dec. 8 in Georgia, "then a lot of other people who are not career politicians but who are very smart will start thinking, maybe I can do that, too, and we will expand the pool from which we selected our leadership."



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • U.S. envoy accuses Russia of allowing Syria to deny needed aid

    World News CTV News
    U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley is accusing Russia of providing cover for the Syrian regime's use of chemical weapons and its denial of desperately needed aid for hundreds of thousands of besieged people, and is urging international pressure on Moscow "to stop this. Source
  • Front line officers felt 'outgunned,' Moncton massacre trial told

    Canada News CTV News
    MONCTON, N.B. -- A senior RCMP officer says he told superiors he was concerned about the lack of firepower for front line officers long before the 2014 Moncton shooting rampage that left three Mounties dead. Source
  • RCMP dive team to help in search for missing hunters in northern Alberta

    Canada News CTV News
    FORT CHIPEWYAN, Alta. -- A team of scuba divers was being called in Thursday to help in the search for four hunters missing in northeastern Alberta. The Mountie dive team from British Columbia was to arrive in the area north of Fort Chipewyan in the afternoon. Source
  • Quebec tables bill to force police to ditch colourful camo pants protest

    Canada News CTV News
    Quebec Public Security Minister Martin Coiteux has tabled a bill to force municipal police officers to ditch their colourful protest pants. The bill amends the Police Act to obligate police officers and special constables to wear the uniform and equipment provided by their employer. Source
  • Former Quebec cabinet minister Sam Hamad leaving politics

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    QUEBEC — Former Quebec cabinet minister Sam Hamad is leaving politics. Hamad quit cabinet last year amid allegations he helped a horticultural company that was trying to get a government grant. He also resigned his role as Quebec treasury board president but continued to sit as a Liberal member of the legislature. Source
  • Police raid Moscow office of group founded by Putin foe

    World News CTV News
    MOSCOW -- Police raided the Moscow office Thursday of an organization founded by a top foe of President Vladimir Putin that helps opposition candidates and political prisoners. Open Russia said on its website that police arrived at the group's office in early afternoon and were searching it without providing an explanation. Source
  • Firefighter 'a little sore' but in good spirits, day after crane rescue

    Canada News CTV News
    A day after acting Toronto Fire Capt. Rob Wonfor scaled a construction crane in a daring bid to rescue a woman dangling 25 storeys in the air, the firefighter says he’s “a little sore” but in good spirits. Source
  • Maria Sharapova: Controversy sells — fairness does not

    World News CBC News
    As Maria Sharapova returns to tennis after serving a 15-month doping ban for taking meldonium, the world is reminded that all is not fair in sport and sometimes, cheaters will prosper.Eugenie Bouchard blasts 'cheater' Sharapova?Questions surrounding Maria Sharapova's returnSharapova returned to the WTA Wednesday, hours after her doping suspension was lifted. Source
  • Flynn was warned not to accept foreign payments in 2014

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON - Documents released by lawmakers show U.S. President Donald Trump's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, was warned when he retired from the military in 2014 not to take foreign money without "advance approval" by Pentagon authorities. Source
  • U.S. admiral says North Korea crisis is at worst point he's seen

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The senior U.S. Navy officer overseeing military operations in the Pacific said Thursday that the crisis with North Korea is at the worst point he's ever seen, but he declined to compare the situation to the Cuban missile crisis decades ago. Source