Ben Carson ends bid for Republican nomination

WASHINGTON -- Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson said he is effectively ending his bid for the White House Wednesday, concluding a roller-coaster campaign that briefly took him to the top of a chaotic GOP field but ended with a Super Tuesday whimper.

See Full Article

"I do not see a political path forward," Carson said in a statement posted on his campaign website, though he added, "I remain deeply committed to my home nation, America" and promised to offer details of his future when he speaks Friday at a conservative conference in Washington.

He did not explicitly say that he's ending his campaign, only noting that he does not plan to take part in Thursday's Fox News debate. But his longtime businessman and friend, Armstrong Williams, confirmed that the soft-spoken candidate would no longer be asking for votes.

"There's only one candidate in this 2016 election on the GOP side, and his name is Trump. That's the reality," Williams said, adding that Sens. Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz also should drop out, as they "also have no path" to the nomination.

Carson's exit reduces the active Republican field to four candidates, though billionaire Donald Trump remains the clear leader in earned delegates and voter preference polls.

Carson, 64, was one of several anti-establishment candidates who shaped the early stages of a Republican race defined by conservatives' wide-ranging disgust with the nation's direction and GOP leaders' perceived inability to alter it.

He ran as an outsider, offering a poverty-to-fame autobiography, his unabashed Christian faith and an unceasing indictment of conventional politics, styling his bid as an effort to combat "political correctness" and what he described as a creep toward "socialism."

That formula fueled a steady climb in the polls and a powerful fundraising effort. But his success also brought intense scrutiny. Carson lashed out publicly at questions about his life story, having to explain anecdotes like his claim to have been offered a "scholarship" to West Point. He made foreign policy flubs, from a mistaken suggestion that China is militarily involved in Syria's civil war, to a high profile speech in which he repeatedly mispronounced the name of the Palestinian political and military organization Hamas.

And he endured public sniping among some of his closest advisers, some of whom contributed to questions about his overall fitness for the job.

The only African-American among the presidential contenders of either major party, Carson announced his bid in May from his native Detroit, where he was raised in a poor neighborhood by a single mother. Though she could not read, Carson said, his mother saw to it that he and his brother received formal educations.

Carson attended Yale University and the University of Michigan Medical School. He earned national acclaim during 29 years leading the pediatric neurosurgery unit of Johns Hopkins Children's Center in Baltimore. He directed the first surgery to separate twins connected at the back of the head. His career was notable enough to inspire the 2009 movie, "Gifted Hands," with actor Cuba Gooding Jr. depicting Carson.

He rose to political prominence with his address at the 2013 National Prayer Breakfast, where he offered a withering critique of the modern welfare state and the nation's overall direction. The speech restated themes from Carson's 2012 book "America the Beautiful," but he excited conservatives by doing so with President Barack Obama sitting just feet away.

He would often tell voters that he viewed his candidacy as a way to honour the American founders' view of the "citizen-statesman."

"If I am successful in this endeavour," he said Dec. 8 in Georgia, "then a lot of other people who are not career politicians but who are very smart will start thinking, maybe I can do that, too, and we will expand the pool from which we selected our leadership."



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • CBC News takes home 44 awards at 2017 RTDNA

    Canada News CBC News
    ?CBC News journalists scooped up 44 awards on Saturday at the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) awards, honouring national and regional work in TV, web and radio. "All these awards recognize our excellence on all platforms," said CBC News editor in chief Jennifer McGuire, noting the CBC took home the lion's share of the 75 awards. Source
  • Family, friends hail the 2 men who died trying to stop attack

    World News CTV News
    PORTLAND, Ore. -- Helpful co-workers. Reliable friends. Well-liked by many who encountered them. Those were the descriptions family, friends and colleagues gave of Taliesin Myrddin Namkai Meche, 23, and Rick Best, 53, the two men who were stabbed to death Friday when they tried to intervene when a man yelled racial slurs at two young women who appeared to be Muslim on a Portland light-rail train. Source
  • 'Cowboys and Indians'-themed party prompts anger at Alberta high school

    Canada News CTV News
    Students at an Alberta high school are being accused of racism and cultural insensitivity after a “Cowboys and Indians”-themed graduation party was held off campus. Images of students from Chinook High School in Lethbridge, Alta. Source
  • Bangladesh reinstalls Lady Justice statue that irked Islamists

    World News CTV News
    DHAKA, Bangladesh -- A sculptor says authorities in Bangladesh have reinstalled a Lady Justice statue near the country's Supreme Court, two days after its removal following complaints by Islamist hard-liners. Sculptor Mrinal Haque said Sunday workers put the statue back in place a few hundred metres from its original location. Source
  • Andrew Scheer sells conservatism with a smile

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    <p>That big grin. It's the first thing everyone notices about newly elected Conservative leader Andrew Scheer.</p> <p>It'll be what the regular voter first sees when Scheer goes to bat one on one against Justin Trudeau in the polls. Source
  • Scheer new Conservative Party leader

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    TORONTO — The final votes will be cast today for a new leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. Some 259,000 people are eligible to vote, deciding between 13 candidates running the gamut from former cabinet ministers to one who has never held public office. Source
  • CTV's W5, local stations win RTDNA awards

    Canada News CTV News
    CTV’s investigative program W5 has won three awards from the Radio Television Digital News Association. W5 won the Dave Rogers Award for Best Long Feature for Network Television for “In Their Footsteps.” The episode features Sandie Rinaldo as she follows a group of Canadian high school students, chaperones, and Holocaust survivors on their emotional tour of Nazi concentration camps in Poland. Source
  • CTV News wins 'best newscast' at RTDNA awards

    Canada News CTV News
    CTV News has been named Best Television Newscast by the Radio Television Digital News Association and CTV’s investigative program W5 has picked up three RTDNA awards. CTV National News, anchored by Lisa LaFlamme, won the Bert Cannings Award for Best Television Newscast at the annual RTDNA awards gala, held Saturday in Toronto. Source
  • Hot air balloon crashes in Alberta just after man proposes marriage

    Canada News CTV News
    A man’s wedding proposal on a hot air balloon didn’t go exactly as planned but his girlfriend still said yes -- and both are excited to have an “awesome” story to tell. Christine Peters says she had wanted to go for a ride in a hot air balloon ever since she was a little girl. Source
  • Andrew Scheer: a profile

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    OTTAWA - When Andrew Scheer first started telling people he was considering a run for the leadership of the federal Conservatives, he’d often get a raised eyebrow in response. Scheer served four years as Speaker of the House of Commons, following several years of serving as deputy Speaker. Source