UN approves toughest sanctions on North Korea in 20 years

The UN Security Council unanimously approved the toughest sanctions on North Korea in two decades on Wednesday, reflecting growing anger at Pyongyang's latest nuclear test and rocket launch in defiance of a ban on all nuclear-related activity.

See Full Article

The United States and North Korea's traditional ally China spent seven weeks negotiating the new sanctions, which include mandatory inspections of cargo leaving and entering North Korea by land, sea or air; a ban on all sales or transfers of small arms and light weapons to Pyongyang; and expulsion of diplomats from the North who engage in "illicit activities."

The U.S., its Western allies and Japan pressed for new sanctions that went beyond the North's nuclear and missile programs but China, Pyongyang's neighbour, was reluctant to impose measures that could threaten the stability of North Korea and cause its economy to collapse. Nonetheless, Beijing did agree to several economic measures.

The resolution bans the export of coal, iron and iron ore being used to fund North Korea's nuclear or ballistic missile programs -- and it prohibits all exports of gold, titanium ore, vanadium ore and rare earth minerals. It also bans aviation fuel exports to the country, including "kerosene-type rocket fuel."

"The international community, speaking with one voice, has sent Pyongyang a simple message: North Korea must abandon these dangerous programs and choose a better path for its people," President Barack Obama said in a statement.

U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power told the council after the vote that "part of the perverse reality that has no equal in this world" is that North Korea prioritizes its nuclear and ballistic missile programs over the basic needs of its own people.

The resolution stresses that the new measures are not intended to have "adverse humanitarian consequences" for civilians, the majority who face economic hardships and food shortages.

In the financial and banking sector, countries are required to freeze the assets of companies and other entities linked to Pyongyang's nuclear and missile programs. Under a previous resolution, they were encouraged to do so.

The resolution also prohibits all countries from opening new branches, subsidiaries and representative offices of North Korean banks, and bans financial institutions from establishing new joint ventures or establishing or maintaining correspondent relationships with these banks. It also orders countries to close all North Korean banks and terminate all banking relationships within 90 days.

Under the four rounds of UN sanctions imposed since the country's first nuclear test in 2006, North Korea is banned from importing or exporting nuclear or missile items and technology as well as luxury goods. The new resolution expands the list of banned items, adding luxury items such as expensive watches, snowmobiles, recreational water vehicles and lead crystal.

It also adds 16 individuals, 12 "entities" including the National Aerospace Development Agency which was responsible for February's rocket launch, and 31 ships owned by the North Korean shipping firm Ocean Maritime Management Company to the sanctions blacklist. That requires the freezing of assets and, in the case of individuals, a travel ban as well.

The resolution bans Pyongyang from chartering vessels or aircraft, and call on countries to "de-register" any vessel owned, operated or crewed by the North.

As with previous resolutions, the test will be whether UN member states enforce the sanctions. A UN panel of experts monitoring the sanctions has repeatedly pointed out that enforcement in a significant number of cases has been weak.

North Korea has ignored many demands, and tried to circumvent others.

It started off the new year with what it claims was its first hydrogen bomb test on Jan. 6 and followed up with the launch of a satellite on a rocket on Feb. 7. It was condemned by much of the world as a test of banned missile technology.

The resolution calls for a resumption of six-party talks leading to the goal of "the verifiable denuclearization of the Korean peninsula in a peaceful manner." North Korea withdrew from the talks in 2008.


Latest Canada & World News

  • 'She will be missed': Calgary sisters remember triplet killed in Arizona

    Canada News CTV News
    A Calgary woman who was struck and killed by an out-of-control vehicle in Arizona is being remembered for her love of life and helping others. Patti Lou Doorbos, who went by the name Lou, died instantly when she and her husband, Ron Doornbos, 60, were hit by an SUV that jumped a median and crashed into them while they were standing on a sidewalk in Fountain Hills, Ariz. Source
  • Crown prince seeks Saudi image makeover on grand U.S. tour

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Saudi Arabia's young crown prince has an ambitious list of to-dos: modernize his conservative kingdom, weaken Iran's hand across the Mideast and, this week, rehabilitate his country's image in the eyes of Americans. Source
  • Facebook whistleblower pushed data-mining boundaries in Canada: source

    Canada News CBC News
    A Canadian data expert who set off an international uproar over the alleged leak of private Facebook user data lost his job years ago in the office of former Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff, in large part because he was pushing a nascent form of the controversial data-harvesting technique, says a former senior party insider. Source
  • Moscow awaits Russian diplomats ordered to leave Britain

    World News CTV News
    Moscow is awaiting nearly two dozen Russian diplomats ordered to leave Britain following a nerve agent attack on U.K. soil. The Russian Foreign Ministry told The Associated Press that the 23 diplomats are expected to leave British territory Tuesday. Source
  • No big woop, Kremlin says of Trump not congratulating Putin

    World News CTV News
    MOSCOW -- The Kremlin spokesman says it's no big deal that U.S. President Donald Trump didn't congratulate Vladimir Putin on his re-election as president. Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters Tuesday that he doesn't consider Trump's silence an "unfriendly move. Source
  • Autopsy planned to determine if Nain boy died of tuberculosis

    Canada News CBC News
    The residents of Nain are in shock after the death of a 14-year-old boy from the northern Labrador community died Sunday in St. John's — and fear it was tuberculosis. Gussie Bennett went from a clinic in Nain to Happy Valley-Goose Bay on Friday, and was then flown to St. Source
  • Ont. police lay charges in five investigations into social media threats

    Canada News CTV News
    Provincial police says five people have been charged with allegedly making threats against Ontario schools on social media. Police say they conducted six separate investigations into threats in the province's central division over the past few weeks, five of which resulted in charges. Source
  • Defence lays out history of pranks at trial into killing of Kim Jong-un's brother

    World News CBC News
    A woman accused of poisoning the North Korean leader's half-brother played a prank on a Vietnamese government official in Hanoi less than two weeks before the sensational killing, her lawyer told a Malaysian court on Tuesday. Source
  • Austrian faces fine for calling police officers 'smurfs'

    World News CTV News
    BERLIN - An Austrian man faces a 160-euro ($197) fine for describing police officers as "smurfs" in a warning about speed checks posted on Facebook. The Austria Press Agency reported Tuesday that authorities in Tyrol province imposed the fine on the man, whose name wasn't released, for violating "public decency" by "defaming two police officers. Source
  • Hidden camera reveals security breach at Hull Hospital lab

    Canada News CBC News
    A hidden camera investigation by Radio-Canada has revealed lax security at the hematology and biochemistry lab of the Hull Hospital, despite a 2017 warning from Quebec's professional order of medical technologists calling for the institution to restrict access. Source