Clinton, Trump take Georgia, Sanders wins Vermont

WASHINGTON -- Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton were sweeping through the South on Super Tuesday, with the front-runners claiming victory in their parties' primaries in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee.

See Full Article

Clinton also picked up a win in Virginia, while Trump carried the Republican contest in Massachusetts.
  • Watch Super Tuesday coverage on CTV News Channel and CTV News GO

Super Tuesday marked the busiest day of the 2016 primaries, with the biggest single-day delegate haul up for grabs. With elections in every region of the country, the contests put a spotlight on candidates' strengths and weaknesses with a broad swath of American voters.

For Clinton and Trump, the voting marked an opportunity to begin pulling away from their rivals and charting a course toward the general election. Each entered Super Tuesday having won three of four early voting contests, and more strong showings could start putting the nominations out of reach for other contenders.

Seconds after polls closed in Georgia, a confident Trump wrote on Twitter, "Thank you Georgia!"

Clinton was steadying herself after an unexpectedly strong challenge from Bernie Sanders. The Vermont senator did carry his home state decisively on Tuesday, and told the crowd at a raucous victory party that he was "so proud to bring Vermont values all across this country."

Early exit polls underscored Sanders' continued weaknesses with black voters, a core part of the Democratic constituency. Clinton led with African-Americans, as well as both men and women, in Georgia and Virginia, according to surveys conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks.

Sanders continued to show strength with young voters, carrying the majority of those under the age of 30.

Democrats were voting in 11 states and American Samoa, with 865 delegates up for grabs. Republicans were voting in 11 states, with 595 delegates at stake.

The contests come at a turbulent time for the GOP, given Trump's strengths in the face of opposition from many party leaders. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz launched furious verbal attacks on the billionaire businessman in recent days, but some in the party establishment fear the anti-Trump campaign has come too late.

Trump's wins in the South were a blow to Cruz, who once saw the region as his opportunity to stake a claim to the nomination. Now Cruz's future hinges on a victory in his home state of Texas, the biggest prize of the day.

Rubio's goal was even more modest. He was seeking to stay competitive in the delegate count and hoping to pull off a win in his home state of Florida on March 15.

Even before the first results started flowing in, Trump was calling on Rubio to give up if he didn't win anywhere on Tuesday.

"He has to get out," Trump told Fox News. "He hasn't won anything."

Republicans spent months largely letting Trump go unchallenged, wrongly assuming that his populist appeal with voters would fizzle. Instead, he's appeared to only grow stronger, winning states and drawing broad support for some of his most controversial proposals.

In six of the states on Tuesday, large majorities of Republican voters said they supported a proposal to temporarily ban all non-citizen Muslims from entering the United States, an idea championed by Trump. Two-thirds of GOP voters in Texas, Virginia and Georgia, 7 in 10 in Tennessee, and nearly 8 in 10 in Alabama supported the proposal, according to the early exit polls.

Worries among Republicans appeared to grow after Trump briefly refused to disavow former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke during a television interview. Trump later said he had not understood the interviewer who first raised the question about Duke, and he did repudiate him.

House Speaker Paul Ryan said Tuesday that anyone who wants to be the Republican presidential nominee must reject any racist group or individual.

"When I see something that runs counter to who we are as a party and a country I will speak up. So today I want to be very clear about something: If a person wants to be the nominee of the Republican Party, there can be no evasion and no games," Ryan said.

The disarray among Republicans comes as Clinton appears to be tightening her grip on the Democratic field. Her wins in Georgia and Virginia were the first of what her campaign hoped would be a sweep of the South, a region where large segments of the Democratic electorate are black.

In Georgia, just under half of Democratic voters on Tuesday were black, with 8 in 10 backing Clinton. About a quarter of Virginia's Democratic voters were black, and also overwhelmingly backed Clinton, according to exit polling.

Democratic voters were more likely to want a continuation of Obama's policies than switch to more liberal policies in eight of nine states where surveys were conducted.

Signalling her growing confidence, Clinton has increasingly turned her attention to Trump in recent days, casting herself as a civil alternative to the insults and bullying that have consumed the Republican race.

"What we can't let happen is the scapegoating, the flaming, the finger pointing that is going on the Republican side," she told voters in Springfield, Massachusetts. "It really undermines our fabric as a nation."

States holding voting contests in both parties were Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont and Virginia. Republicans also vote in Alaska and Democrats in Colorado. Democrats also have a contest in American Samoa and for Democrats Abroad.

------

Colvin reported from Valdosta, Georgia. AP writers Alan Fram and Andrew Taylor contributed to this report.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Time to flee the Robolution

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    The federal budget was chilling in many ways, but here’s what scares me the most: Robots are after your job. Those career-snatching tin cans were a focus of finance minister Bill Morneau’s speech, which outlined $5.2 billion in job retraining for us poor human schmucks. Source
  • Spoiled brat Red Bull heir wins new delay

    World News Toronto Sun
    BANGKOK — An heir to the Red Bull fortune won another delay Thursday in facing charges over an alleged hit-and-run that killed a police officer almost five years ago. Vorayuth “Boss” Yoovidhya has been a no-show for meetings with prosecutors on several occasions, complaining through his attorney of unfair treatment, or citing duties out of the country. Source
  • Russian granny decapitates pal, boils head

    World News Toronto Sun
    A barbaric babushka - called ‘The Granny Ripper’ - beheaded a pal then boiled her head and cops fear she has more victims. According to Russian prosecutors, Tamara Samsonova, 68, knocked out her friend Valentina Ulanova, 79, with 50 sleeping pills she crushed into a salad. Source
  • Waste-of-time Tories should get off ballot

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    If not for the convoluted rat’s nest that federal Conservatives have concocted to choose their next leader, Friday’s midnight deadline to get off the ballot might have had a few takers. But the odds are good no one will pull the pin, and that includes the truly hopeless among the baker’s dozen-plus-one vying to kick interim Conservative Leader Rona Ambrose out of Stornoway, and take on the Pied Piperism of Justin Trudeau in 2019. Source
  • Top aide to U.S. President Trump leaves administration

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- A top aide to President Donald Trump said she is leaving his administration to join a pro-Trump outside group, America First Policies. Deputy chief of staff Katie Walsh said Thursday she decided to make the move after the Trump-backed health care bill failed last week to amass enough support to clear the House. Source
  • Roger Daltrey: 'Dead dog’ would have beaten Hillary Clinton

    World News Toronto Sun
    LONDON — Roger Daltrey says “a dead dog” would have beaten Hillary Clinton in the U.S. presidential election. The Who’s legendary front man tells the British music news website NME that President Donald Trump “really didn’t win” the election because Democrats “threw it away. Source
  • Former ’Top Model’ contestant among Houston shooting victims

    World News Toronto Sun
    HOUSTON — One of the four people wounded in a Houston shooting that also killed two victims was a former contestant on “America’s Next Top Model” and the sister of one of the men who died. Court records identified 32-year-old Brandy Rusher as one of the wounded. Source
  • Police seek driver who 'intentionally rammed' cruiser in Toronto

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO - Police say they're looking for a driver who rammed an OPP cruiser with his car on Highway 401 in east-end Toronto early Thursday. Provincial police Sgt. Kerry Schmidt says an officer noticed a vehicle without plates and pulled up beside it to get a look at the driver. Source
  • 'It starts with hope': Indigenous Affairs Minister announces funding for Ontario First Nations children

    Canada News CBC News
    Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett has announced $9.11 million to help Ontario First Nations raise children in healthy and safe environments. "It starts with hope," Bennett said during a visit on Thursday to Sudbury, Ont. Source
  • Fire burns through at least 125 hectares of marsh in Point Pelee National Park

    Canada News CTV News
    LEAMINGTON, Ont. - A southwestern Ontario national park popular with bird watchers is closed after a fire burned through part of the site on the north shore of Lake Erie. Leamington, Ont., fire officials say the blaze at Point Pelee National Park appears to be out. Source