Super Tuesday: Clinton, Trump look to pull away from rivals

WASHINGTON -- Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton see an opportunity to pull away from their rivals on Super Tuesday, as almost a dozen state contests across the country could accelerate their march toward the general election.

See Full Article

It's busiest day of the 2016 primary campaign, with a quarter of Americans having their say.

The contests come at a turbulent moment for Republicans as they grapple with the prospect of Trump becoming the party's nominee. His main rivals, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, are engaged in a frantic effort to stop the billionaire real estate magnate, but it was unclear whether they had made their move too late.

Tensions boiled over during a Trump rally Monday in Virginia, where he was repeatedly disrupted by demonstrators, including 20 or more chanting "Black lives matter." At another point, he asked a protester, "Are you from Mexico?" after he was interrupted during remarks about immigration. He ordered several people to be removed, then cast himself as a unifying political force.

"Believe it or not, we're going to unify this country," he said.

Like Trump, Clinton has won three of the four early voting contests, including in South Carolina on Saturday. Her victory over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders there was due to overwhelming support from black voters, putting her in position for a strong showing in several Southern states with large African-American electorates voting Tuesday.

Clinton in recent days has chosen to focus on Trump. She is casting herself as a civil alternative to the insults and bullying that have consumed the Republican race.

"What we can't let happen is the scapegoating, the flaming, the finger pointing that is going on the Republican side," she told voters Monday in Massachusetts. "It really undermines our fabric as a nation."

Sanders, who has energized young voters with his call for a political revolution, was seeking to pick up victories in states including Minnesota and Vermont. But he faces tough questions about whether he can rally minorities, who are core Democratic voters. Still, he has the resources to stay in the race through the last primaries in June, with his campaign announcing it had raised more than $41 million in February.

Democrats will vote in 11 states and American Samoa on Super Tuesday, with 865 delegates up for grabs. It will take 1,237 delegates to secure the nomination at the party's national convention in July.

Republicans will vote in 11 states, with 595 delegates at stake -- nearly half the 1,237 delegates needed to gain the nomination at the party's convention, also in July.

States holding voting contests in both parties Tuesday are Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont and Virginia. Republicans vote in Alaska and Democrats in Colorado.

Trump was seeking to sweep the South, which would be a massive blow for Cruz. The Texas senator, a favourite of the region's social conservatives and evangelical Christians, expected the South to be his strength, but now is simply hoping for a victory in his home state.

Rubio's goal on Super Tuesday is even more modest. He's seeking to stay competitive in the delegate count and hopes to pull off a win in his home state of Florida on March 15.

The Florida senator has cast himself as Republicans' best chance to win in a general election and has received a flood of endorsements from party officials after other more mainstream candidates dropped out. But he's failed to win a state so far.

Republicans spent months largely letting Trump go unchallenged, wrongly assuming that his populist appeal with voters would fizzle.

An Associated Press survey of Republican senators and governors across the country showed just under half of respondents would not commit to backing Trump if he's the nominee. Their reluctance foreshadowed a potentially extraordinary split in the party this fall.

The worries among Republicans appeared to grow after Trump briefly refused to disavow former white supremacist leader David Duke during a television interview. Trump said he had not understood the interviewer who first raised the question, and he did later repudiate Duke.

Colvin reported from Valdosta, Georgia. AP writers Alan Fram and Andrew Taylor contributed to this report.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Canada's 2015 federal election may have been influenced by outsiders, according to a new report

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    Foreign money funnelled towards Canadian political advocacy groups affected the outcome of the 2015 federal election, according to a document filed last week with Elections Canada and obtained in part by the Herald. The 36-page report entitled: Elections Canada Complaint Regarding Foreign Influence in the 2015 Canadian Election, alleges third parties worked with each other, which may have bypassed election spending limits — all of which appears to be in contravention of the Canada Elections…
  • Saffie Roussos, 8, among 22 killed by suicide bomber at Ariana Grande show in Manchester [Photos] [Vide

    World News Toronto Sun
    British authorities say an 8-year-old girl, Saffie Roussos, was among the 22 who died in the Manchester bombing. Medical officials say 12 children under the age of 16 were among those injured in the suicide bombing attack at a pop concert in Manchester, England. Source
  • Toronto's Air Canada Centre adding more security staff after Manchester bombing

    Canada News CTV News
    Ariana Grande says she is 'broken' after Manchester bombing 'Evil losers': Trump condemns Manchester attack Terror attack in Manchester 'intended to kill little girls,' experts say Source
  • Three Nova Scotia men facing charges in $3M international lobster fraud and theft case

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    BARRINGTON, N.S. - More than $3 million worth of lobster is at the centre of a complex, international case involving fraud and theft allegations against three Nova Scotia men, RCMP said Tuesday. The Mounties’ investigation started in July 2015 when allegations arose that a man from Shag Harbour, N.S. Source
  • Terror attack in Manchester 'intended to kill little girls,' experts say

    World News CTV News
    The suicide bombing at an arena in Manchester was meant to strike at soft targets, including underage girls, in order to "shock the world," terror experts say. Twenty-two people were killed, including an eight-year-old girl, and another 59 were injured following the suicide bombing at Manchester Arena Tuesday night, at the conclusion of an Ariana Grande performance. Source
  • Suicide bomber at Ariana Grande concert kills 22 [Photos] [Video]

    World News Toronto Sun
    MANCHESTER, England — An apparent suicide bomber attacked an Ariana Grande concert as it ended Monday night, killing 22 people among a panicked crowd of young concertgoers, some still wearing the star’s trademark kitten ears and holding pink balloons as they fled. Source
  • Donald Trump: ‘Evil losers’ carried out deadly terrorist attack on Manchester concert goers [Photos] [V

    World News Toronto Sun
    BETHLEHEM - President Donald Trump on Tuesday condemned the “evil losers” responsible for a deadly attack on concert-goers in England and called on leaders in the Middle East in particular to help root out violence. “The terrorists and extremists and those who give them aid and comfort must be driven out from our society forever,” Trump said in Bethlehem alongside Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas. Source
  • Condemned church shooter Roof seeks appellate court mercy

    World News CTV News
    COLUMBIA, S.C. - A white supremacist sentenced to death for killing nine worshippers in a racist attack at a Charleston church has petitioned an appeals court for mercy. Attorneys for Dylann Roof filed notice Tuesday they were appealing his conviction and sentence to the 4th U.S. Source
  • Ex-CIA chief concerned over Trump campaign Kremlin contacts

    World News CBC News
    Former CIA director John Brennan said Tuesday he was concerned about the number of contacts between Americans "involved" with the Trump campaign and the Russians last year. During his first public remarks since he left his post in January, Brennan told lawmakers he was so concerned about Russia's efforts to interfere in the 2016 election and recruit Americans that he convened a group of officials from the CIA, FBI and National Security Agency in late July to focus exclusively on the…
  • Ex-CIA chief concerned by Trump campaign's Kremlin contacts

    World News CBC News
    Former CIA director John Brennan said Tuesday he was concerned about the number of contacts between Americans "involved" with the Trump campaign and the Russians last year. During his first public remarks since he left his post in January, Brennan told lawmakers he was so concerned about Russia's efforts to interfere in the 2016 election and recruit Americans that he convened a group of officials from the CIA, FBI and National Security Agency in late July to focus exclusively on the…