Super Tuesday: Clinton, Trump look to pull away from rivals

WASHINGTON -- Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton see an opportunity to pull away from their rivals on Super Tuesday, as almost a dozen state contests across the country could accelerate their march toward the general election.

See Full Article

It's busiest day of the 2016 primary campaign, with a quarter of Americans having their say.

The contests come at a turbulent moment for Republicans as they grapple with the prospect of Trump becoming the party's nominee. His main rivals, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, are engaged in a frantic effort to stop the billionaire real estate magnate, but it was unclear whether they had made their move too late.

Tensions boiled over during a Trump rally Monday in Virginia, where he was repeatedly disrupted by demonstrators, including 20 or more chanting "Black lives matter." At another point, he asked a protester, "Are you from Mexico?" after he was interrupted during remarks about immigration. He ordered several people to be removed, then cast himself as a unifying political force.

"Believe it or not, we're going to unify this country," he said.

Like Trump, Clinton has won three of the four early voting contests, including in South Carolina on Saturday. Her victory over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders there was due to overwhelming support from black voters, putting her in position for a strong showing in several Southern states with large African-American electorates voting Tuesday.

Clinton in recent days has chosen to focus on Trump. She is casting herself as a civil alternative to the insults and bullying that have consumed the Republican race.

"What we can't let happen is the scapegoating, the flaming, the finger pointing that is going on the Republican side," she told voters Monday in Massachusetts. "It really undermines our fabric as a nation."

Sanders, who has energized young voters with his call for a political revolution, was seeking to pick up victories in states including Minnesota and Vermont. But he faces tough questions about whether he can rally minorities, who are core Democratic voters. Still, he has the resources to stay in the race through the last primaries in June, with his campaign announcing it had raised more than $41 million in February.

Democrats will vote in 11 states and American Samoa on Super Tuesday, with 865 delegates up for grabs. It will take 1,237 delegates to secure the nomination at the party's national convention in July.

Republicans will vote in 11 states, with 595 delegates at stake -- nearly half the 1,237 delegates needed to gain the nomination at the party's convention, also in July.

States holding voting contests in both parties Tuesday are Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont and Virginia. Republicans vote in Alaska and Democrats in Colorado.

Trump was seeking to sweep the South, which would be a massive blow for Cruz. The Texas senator, a favourite of the region's social conservatives and evangelical Christians, expected the South to be his strength, but now is simply hoping for a victory in his home state.

Rubio's goal on Super Tuesday is even more modest. He's seeking to stay competitive in the delegate count and hopes to pull off a win in his home state of Florida on March 15.

The Florida senator has cast himself as Republicans' best chance to win in a general election and has received a flood of endorsements from party officials after other more mainstream candidates dropped out. But he's failed to win a state so far.

Republicans spent months largely letting Trump go unchallenged, wrongly assuming that his populist appeal with voters would fizzle.

An Associated Press survey of Republican senators and governors across the country showed just under half of respondents would not commit to backing Trump if he's the nominee. Their reluctance foreshadowed a potentially extraordinary split in the party this fall.

The worries among Republicans appeared to grow after Trump briefly refused to disavow former white supremacist leader David Duke during a television interview. Trump said he had not understood the interviewer who first raised the question, and he did later repudiate Duke.

Colvin reported from Valdosta, Georgia. AP writers Alan Fram and Andrew Taylor contributed to this report.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • 'This military operation is indeed wrapping up,' Putin meets with Assad about political solutions for Syria

    World News CBC News
    Russian President Vladimir Putin hosted Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad for talks at which the two men agreed that the focus in the Syrian conflict was now switching from military operations to the search for a political solution. Source
  • Myanmar treatment of Rohingya called 'dehumanizing apartheid'

    World News CTV News
    BANGKOK - Myanmar has subjected Rohingya Muslims to long-term discrimination and persecution that amounts to "dehumanizing apartheid," Amnesty International said Tuesday in a report that raises questions about what those who have fled a violent military crackdown would face if they returned home. Source
  • Rohingya subjected to 'dehumanizing apartheid': Amnesty International

    World News CBC News
    Myanmar has subjected Rohingya Muslims to long-term discrimination and persecution that amounts to "dehumanizing apartheid," Amnesty International said Tuesday in a report that raises questions about what those who have fled a violent military crackdown would face if they returned home. Source
  • Berkeley balcony collapse victims settle lawsuit

    World News CTV News
    BERKELEY, Calif. - Relatives of six college students who died when a balcony collapsed in Berkeley, California, have reached a settlement with the owners of the apartment building and the company that managed it, it was announced Monday. Source
  • Canada on alert as U.S. announces end to temporary resident status for Haitians

    Canada News CBC News
    A decision by the Trump administration to end a temporary residency permit program that has allowed almost 60,000 Haitians to live and work in the United States has the Canadian government on alert for a potential new surge of asylum seekers at the border. Source
  • Body of Quebec man missing in northern California found

    World News CTV News
    ARCATA, Calif. - The body of a young man from Sherbrooke, Que., who had been missing for two weeks in northern California, has been found. According to police in Arcata, the body of 25-year-old Felix Desautels-Poirier was found in a marsh in a city park by a member of his family. Source
  • Kids gather in Ottawa to develop Canadian Children's Charter

    Canada News CTV News
    Dozens of youth gathered in Ottawa on Monday to mark National Child Day and to develop Canada’s first “Children’s Charter,” which will be unveiled in Parliament on Wednesday. Sara Austin, who runs the advocacy group Children First Canada, says the charter is needed to draw attention to the fact that children’s rights are not being adequately protected. Source
  • Quebec City paramedics say string of deaths show need for more ambulances

    Canada News CTV News
    Quebec City paramedics are pressuring their provincial government to put more ambulances on the roads, pointing to three deaths in four days as evidence of a shortage. Jean-Francois Gagne, a member of the paramedics union FPHQ, described one of the incidents, which he says happened on Sunday at around 4 a.m. Source
  • U.S. ending temporary permits for almost 60,000 Haitians

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The Trump administration said Monday it is ending a temporary residency permit program that has allowed almost 60,000 citizens from Haiti to live and work in the United States since a 2010 powerful earthquake shook the Caribbean nation. Source
  • Trump charity stepped up 2016 giving amid campaign scrutiny

    World News CTV News
    NEW YORK -- U.S. President Donald Trump sharply increased the amount of money he gave away through his foundation last year as the charity drew scrutiny during the campaign. A 2016 tax return posted on the non-profit monitoring website GuideStar shows that the Donald J. Source