Clinton, Trump head to Super Tuesday after latest victories

COLUMBIA, S.C. -- Hillary Clinton resoundingly reclaimed her standing as the front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination with a lopsided victory over Bernie Sanders in South Carolina, giving her momentum heading into the Super Tuesday contests in multiple states.

See Full Article

For Sanders, the roughly 50-point defeat crystalized his weakness with black voters, a crucial segment of the Democratic electorate. If he loses blacks by similar margins in the Southern states that vote Tuesday, Clinton would likely take a delegate lead difficult for the Vermont senator to overcome.

Taken together, 865 Democratic delegates to the party's national nominating convention are up for grabs in the Super Tuesday contests in 11 states and American Samoa. Sanders aims to stay close to Clinton in the South while focusing most of his attention on states in the Midwest and Northeast, including his home state of Vermont.

As Clinton relished the most sweeping victory of her political career, her focus was already on Super Tuesday -- and the general election.

"Despite what you hear, we don't need to make America great again," Clinton said at a rally Saturday night, alluding to Republican front-runner Donald Trump and his campaign slogan. "America has never stopped being great," Clinton declared.

Sanders acknowledged getting "decimated" in South Carolina, but said Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press" that his campaign is "looking to the future, not looking back" as the contests move outside the South.

Like Clinton, Trump has won three of the four early voting contests. He's cleared the field of nearly all his rivals, but is engaged in an increasingly bitter contest with Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz, two senators scrambling to stop the billionaire from running away with the Republican nomination.

On Tuesday, Republicans will vote in 11 states, with 595 delegates at stake.

Cruz acknowledged that a strong showing by Trump on Tuesday could perhaps seal the nomination for the real estate magnate. The Texas senator told CBS' "Face the Nation" on Sunday that "there is no doubt that if Donald steamrolls through Super Tuesday, wins everywhere with big margins, that he may well be unstoppable."

Whatever the polls, Rubio expressed confidence that Trump won't be the Republican presidential nominee. But the Florida senator warned Sunday on CBS' "Face the Nation that if Trump does win the nomination "it will split us and splinter us in a way that we may never be able to recover."

The Republican candidates fired insults at each other Saturday. Cruz asked parents if they would be pleased if their children spouted profanities in the manner of the brash billionaire, while Rubio mocked Trump as a "con artist" with "the worst spray tan in America."

For Clinton, South Carolina was a moment to wipe away bitter memories of her loss to Barack Obama there eight years ago. She won the support of nearly 9 in 10 black voters, crucial Democratic backers who had abandoned her for Obama in 2008.

Sanders, expecting defeat on Saturday, left the state before voting finished and turned his attention to states outside the South that vote in Tuesday's delegate-rich contests. He didn't mention the results of the South Carolina vote once in a nearly hour-long speech in Minnesota late Saturday night, but in a statement, vowed to fight on aggressively.

Clinton allies quickly touted the breadth of her victory. Along with blacks, she won most women and voters aged 30 and older, according to exit polls conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks..

Sanders continued to do well with young voters, his most passionate supporters. He also carried those who identified themselves as independent and most white voters.

A self-described democratic socialist, Sanders has energized his supporters with impassioned calls for breaking up Wall Street banks and making tuition free at public colleges and universities. But the senator from Vermont, a state where about 1 per cent of the population is black, lacks Clinton's deep ties to the African-American community.

Clinton's second White House bid lurched to an uneven start, with a narrow victory over Sanders in Iowa and a crushing loss to the senator in New Hampshire. She pulled off a five-point win over Sanders in last week's Nevada caucus, a crucial victory that helped stem Sanders' momentum.

Clinton's campaign hopes her strong showing in South Carolina foreshadows similar outcomes in states such as Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee and Virginia that vote Tuesday and have large minority populations.

Sanders has built a massive network of small donors and has the money to stay in the race deep into the spring. Still, Clinton's campaign sees a chance to build enough of a delegate lead to put the race out of reach during the sprint through March.

Clinton picked up most of South Carolina's 53 delegates, winning 39 to Sanders' 14.

Going into South Carolina, Clinton had a one-delegate edge over Sanders. However, she has a substantial lead among superdelegates, the Democratic Party leaders who can vote for the candidate of their choice at this summer's national convention, regardless of how their states vote. It takes 2,383 delegates to win the nomination.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • FBI agent indicted over Oregon refuge standoff shooting

    World News CTV News
    PORTLAND, Ore. - An FBI agent has been indicted on accusations that he lied about firing at a rancher in 2016 when officers arrested leaders of an armed occupation of a federal wildlife refuge in rural Oregon. Source
  • Trump administration plans border wall models in summer

    World News Toronto Sun
    SAN DIEGO - The agency in charge of U.S. border security plans to start building prototypes for President Donald Trump’s proposed wall with Mexico later this summer. Ronald Vitiello, Customs and Border Protection’s acting deputy commissioner, said Tuesday that four to eight companies will get contracts for prototypes in San Diego that could be models for the roughly 2,000-mile (3,200-kilometre) border. Source
  • Activists take step to recall judge in Brock Turner sex assault case

    World News CTV News
    SAN FRANCISCO - Activists seeking to recall a judge who sentenced a former Stanford University swimmer to six months in jail for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman say they believe voters will still support the effort even if it appears on the ballot two years after the trial. Source
  • Iran accuses U.S. of 'brazen' plan to change its government

    World News CTV News
    Iran is accusing U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson of "a brazen interventionist plan" to change the current government that violates international law and the UN Charter. Iran's UN Ambassador Gholamali Khoshroo said in a letter to Secretary-General Antonio Guterres circulated Tuesday that Tillerson's comments are also "a flagrant violation" of the 1981 Algiers Accords in which the United States pledged "not to intervene, directly or indirectly, politically or militarily, in Iran's internal…
  • Major security measures for Ottawa's Canada 150 bash amid ISIS threat

    Canada News CTV News
    More than 500,000 revelers are expected to flock to Parliament Hill Saturday to celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary, and heightened security will be in place across the capital to ensure the party goes off without a hitch. Source
  • One Hong Kong, two sentiments after 20 years of Chinese rule

    World News CTV News
    Hong Kong is planning a big party as it marks 20 years under Chinese rule. But many people in the former British colony are not in the mood to celebrate. Fireworks, a gala variety show and Chinese military displays are among the official events planned to coincide with a visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping starting Thursday for the occasion. Source
  • Sarah Palin sues New York Times for defamation

    World News Toronto Sun
    NEW YORK - Former vice-presidential nominee and Alaska governor Sarah Palin is accusing The New York Times of defamation over an editorial that linked one of her political action committee ads to the mass shooting that severely wounded then-Arizona Congressman Gabby Giffords. Source
  • Venezuelan president claims helicopter fired on Supreme Court

    World News CTV News
    CARACAS, Venezuela -- President Nicolas Maduro said a helicopter fired on Venezuela's Supreme Court Tuesday in a confusing incident that he claimed was part of a conspiracy to destabilize his socialist government. An Associated Press reporter heard gunfire as a blue helicopter buzzed through downtown but was unable to confirm where the shots were being fired from. Source
  • Venezuelan officials claim helicopter fired on Supreme Court

    World News CTV News
    CARACAS, Venezuela - President Nicolas Maduro said a stolen police helicopter fired on Venezuela's Supreme Court Tuesday in what he called a thwarted "terrorist attack" aimed at ousting him from power. The confusing exchange, which is bound to ratchet up tensions in a country already paralyzed by months of deadly anti-government protests, took place as Maduro was speaking live on state television. Source
  • Canada 150: Port Stanley shawarma, via Israel and India

    Canada News CTV News
    Port Stanley, Ont., was perhaps the last place Doris and Gabriel Chordekar expected to find themselves. Eight years ago they were living in Tel Aviv, Israel. Before that they were in Mumbai, India. But wherever they lived, Doris and Gabriel Chordekar didn't feel safe raising their two daughters. Source