Clinton cruises to big win over Sanders in South Carolina

COLUMBIA, S.C. -- Hillary Clinton sailed to a commanding victory over Bernie Sanders in Saturday's South Carolina primary, drawing overwhelming support from the state's black Democrats and putting her in strong position as the race barrels toward Super Tuesday's crucial contests.

See Full Article

Clinton's win provided an important boost for her campaign - and a moment to wipe away bitter memories of her loss to Barack Obama in South Carolina eight years ago. As she makes her second White House run, Clinton has warmly embraced Obama, who remains widely popular with Democrats and particularly African-Americans.

Eight in 10 black voters went for Clinton, according to early surveys from polling places.

Clinton's victory came at the end of a day that saw Republican candidates firing insults at each other from Super Tuesday states. Donald Trump, working to build an insurmountable lead, was campaigning in Arkansas with former rival Chris Christie and calling Marco Rubio a "light little nothing;" Ted Cruz was asking parents in Atlanta if they would be pleased if their children spouted profanities like the brash billionaire, and Rubio was mocking Trump as a "con artist" with "the worst spray tan in America."

Sanders, expecting defeat on Saturday, left South Carolina even before voting finished and turned his attention to some of the states that vote in next Tuesday's delegate-rich contests. He drew 10,000 people to a rally in Austin, a liberal bastion in conservative Texas, the biggest March 1 prize.

"On Super Tuesday the state that is going to be voting for the most delegates is the great state of Texas," Sanders told the crowd at a Formula One racetrack. "If all of you come out to vote and you bring your friends and your neighbors and your co-workers, we are going to win here in Texas."

While Sanders spent the end of the week outside of South Carolina, his campaign did invest heavily in the state. He had 200 paid staff on the ground and an aggressive television advertising campaign.

A self-described democratic socialist, Sanders has energized young people and liberals with his impassioned calls for breaking up Wall Street banks and making tuition free at public colleges and universities. But the senator from Vermont, a state where about 1 percent of the population is black, lacks Clinton's deep ties to the African-American community.

Exit polls showed 6 in 10 voters in Saturday's South Carolina primary were black. About 7 in 10 said they wanted the next president to continue Obama's policies, and only about 20 percent wanted a more liberal course of action, according to exit polls conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks.

Clinton's sweeping victory suggested South Carolina voters had put aside any lingering tensions from her heated 2008 contest with Obama. Former President Bill Clinton made statements during that campaign that were seen by some, including influential South Carolina Rep. James Clyburn, as questioning the legitimacy of the black presidential contender.

This time around, Clyburn endorsed Clinton, and her husband was well-received as he traveled around the state on her behalf. She also focused extensively on issues with particular resonance in the black community, including gun violence. She held an emotional event in South Carolina with black mothers whose children died in shootings.

Clinton's second White House bid lurched to an uneven start, with a narrow victory over Sanders in Iowa and a crushing loss to the senator in New Hampshire. She pulled off a 5-point win over Sanders in last week's Nevada caucus, a crucial victory that helped stem Sanders' momentum.

Clinton's campaign hopes her strong showing with black voters in South Carolina foreshadows similar outcomes in states like Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee and Virginia that vote Tuesday and have large minority populations.

Taken together, 865 Democratic delegates are up for grabs in the Super Tuesday contests in 11 states and American Samoa.

Because Democrats apportion delegates proportionally, Sanders is simply hoping to stay close to Clinton in the South. But he's focusing most of his attention on states in the Midwest and Northeast, including his home state of Vermont.

Sanders, a fierce opponent of super PACs and high-dollar campaign fundraising, has built a massive network of small donors and has the money to stay in the race deep into the spring. Still, Clinton's campaign sees a chance to build enough of a delegate lead to put the race out of reach during the sprint through March.

Going into South Carolina, Clinton had just a one-delegate edge over Sanders. However, she also has a massive lead among superdelegates, the Democratic Party leaders who can vote for the candidate of their choice at this summer's national convention, regardless of how their states vote.

---

Pace reported from Washington. Associated Press writer Catherine Lucey in Austin, Texas, and Ken Thomas in Washington contributed to this report.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Taliban announce start of spring offensive in Afghanistan

    World News CTV News
    ISLAMABAD - Afghanistan's Taliban announced the start of their spring offensive Friday, promising to build their political base in the country while focusing military assaults on coalition and Afghan security forces. Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid announced the launch of the offensive in an email statement that boasted Taliban control over more than half of the country, referencing a February report issued by Washington's special inspector general for Afghan reconstruction. Source
  • Trump to sign order aimed at expanding offshore drilling

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Working to dismantle his predecessor's environmental legacy, President Donald Trump plans to sign an executive order Friday that could lead to the expansion of drilling in the Arctic and Atlantic oceans. With one day left to rack up accomplishments before he reaches his 100th day in office, Trump will order his interior secretary to review an Obama-era plan that dictates which locations are open to offshore drilling, with the goal of the new administration to expand…
  • Sagkeeng First Nation holds vigil for Serena McKay

    Canada News CTV News
    Members of Sagkeeng First Nation in northern Manitoba gathered around a sacred fire on Thursday to mark the loss of yet another woman to violence. Serena McKay, 19, was found dead on Sunday. Two teens girls, ages 16 and 17, have been charged with second-degree murder. Source
  • TTC pulls bendy buses off the road over safety concerns

    Canada News CBC News
    The Toronto Transit Commission is grounding its entire fleet of articulated buses after maintenance staff experienced a "full throttle," or unexpected acceleration, during routine maintenance Thursday afternoon. The TTC says 153 of the 60-foot so-called bendy buses are now off the road. Source
  • Autistic man eating free cookies pepper-sprayed: Cops

    World News Toronto Sun
    ROSEVILLE, Minn. — A former security guard faces charges after allegedly pepper-spraying an autistic man who was eating free cookies at a Minnesota grocery store. Timothy Knutsen of St. Paul is charged with two misdemeanour counts of fifth-degree assault and disorderly conduct for the March incident at a Cub Foods in Roseville. Source
  • Star Trek inspired licence plate deemed offensive in Manitoba

    Canada News CTV News
    Manitoba’s public insurance company has revoked a Star Trek inspired custom licence plate after receiving complaints that it’s offensive. Nick Troller’s two-year-old plate reads “ASIMIL8.” Troller keeps it inside a licence plate holder that says: “WE ARE THE BORG. Source
  • Customer pepper-sprays man with autism for eating cookies: police

    World News CTV News
    ROSEVILLE, Minn. -- A former security guard faces charges after allegedly pepper-spraying an autistic man who was eating free cookies at a Minnesota grocery store. Timothy Knutsen of St. Paul is charged with two misdemeanour counts of fifth-degree assault and disorderly conduct for the March incident at a Cub Foods in Roseville. Source
  • $300K posh public potty pops up in New York [Photos]

    World News Toronto Sun
    NEW YORK — In a park amid skyscrapers, a gem has emerged: a posh public bathroom that cost nearly $300,000, complete with freshly delivered flowers, imported tiles, classical music and artwork. The free-of-charge, air-conditioned splendor, inspired by visits to the city’s priciest hotels, is open to everyone. Source
  • More needs to be done to ensure workplace safety: Advocate [Video]

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    Too many young people don’t know their rights, which is contributing to thousands of work-related injuries and tragedies, an advocate says. Rob Ellis, of My Safe Workplace, said Thursday that last year 125,000 Canadians, ages 15-20, were hurt on the job. Source
  • Carson Morin trial: Accused murderer's criminal past revealed in court

    Canada News CBC News
    The Ottawa man on trial for murder in the fatal stabbing of 20 year-old Michael Wassill was once convicted of a brutal assault on another man with a baseball bat that put the victim in hospital with a concussion. Source