Scalia remembered as man of faith, family and law

WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia was remembered Saturday as a man of faith, family and the law in a funeral marked by church ritual and pageantry for the conservative jurist whose larger-than-life personality dominated the high court for nearly three decades.

See Full Article

A who's who of the nation's political and legal elite was among more than 3,000 mourners at a funeral Mass for Scalia at the largest Catholic church in the United States. Vice-President Joe Biden and 10 of the 11 living justices with whom Scalia served joined his wife of 55 years, their nine children and dozens of grandchildren on a balmy winter morning.

President Barack Obama did not attend Scalia's funeral Mass, despite some criticism from Republicans. The White House said the decision is a "respectful arrangement" given the president's large security detail and Biden's personal relationship with Scalia's family.

Scalia was buried later Saturday in a private ceremony at an undisclosed location. He died unexpectedly last week at age 79 at a resort ranch in west Texas. He was the longest-serving among the current justices and the court's most outspoken conservative.

His death has set off a tumultuous political fight over a replacement and is affecting the presidential campaign.

The Rev. Paul Scalia, the justice's son and a Catholic priest, presided over a traditional service that lasted more than 1 1/2 hours and dispensed with eulogies that Scalia himself had said he did not like. Instead, his son spoke with reverence and humour about Scalia as a father and Catholic who saw "no conflict between faith and the love of one's country."

Scalia regarded the founding of the United States as "a blessing -- a blessing quickly lost when faith is banned from the public square or when we refuse to bring it there," his son said.

As a father, "he loved us and sought to show that love and sought to share the blessing of the faith he treasured," he said.

"Sure he forgot our names at times or mixed them up, but there are nine of us," Paul Scalia said to laughter from the crowd at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception.

Among the other participants in the Mass was Justice Clarence Thomas, who also is Catholic. Thomas read a passage from the New Testament's Book of Romans.

Scalia was known as a champion of originalism -- interpreting the Constitution according to the meaning understood when it was adopted. He famously sparred with liberals who view the constitution as a "living document" and frequently declared in public speeches his view that the Constitution is "dead, dead, dead."

His flag-draped casket was brought to the church from the Supreme Court, where more than 6,000 visitors, including President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama, paid their respects on Friday.

Associated Press writer Jessica Gresko contributed to this report.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • 'We need him': Yazidi mother pleads for Canada's help to reunite with injured son

    Canada News CTV News
    A Yazidi refugee who escaped Iraq with four of her six sons is pleading for Canadian officials to reunite her with her 12-year-old son Emad, whom she only recently learned is alive. An Islamic State attack in August 2014 separated Nofa Mihlo Zaghla from two of her sons and her husband. Source
  • Minneapolis police chief resigns in wake of Justine Damond shooting

    World News Toronto Sun
    Minneapolis police Chief Janee Harteau resigned Friday at the request of the mayor, who said she lost confidence in the chief following last week’s shooting death of an unarmed Australian woman by a police officer. In a statement released Friday, Harteau said: “I’ve decided I am willing to step aside to let a fresh set of leadership eyes see what more can be done for the MPD to be the very best it can be. Source
  • Minneapolis police chief resigns after officer's shooting of Australian woman

    World News CBC News
    Minneapolis police Chief Janee Harteau resigned Friday at the request of the mayor, who said she lost confidence in the chief following last week's shooting death of an unarmed Australian woman by a police officer. In a statement released Friday, Harteau said: "I've decided I am willing to step aside to let a fresh set of leadership eyes see what more can be done for the MPD to be the very best it can be. Source
  • Who is Anthony Scaramucci, Trump's new communications chief?

    World News CTV News
    NEW YORK -- He was the only Trump ally on stage that day. Yet Anthony Scaramucci didn't seem to mind the tough questions from MSNBC host Joe Scarborough or the hostile crowd that filled the luxury hotel ballroom at last month's private gathering of Mitt Romney supporters. Source
  • Qur’an submerged in lard mailed to California Islamic centre

    World News Toronto Sun
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Police are investigating the mailing of a Qur’an submerged in a tub of what appeared to be pork lard to a Northern California Islamic centre. The Sacramento chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations received the package in June, and it follows two other incidents of defaced Qurans at nearby mosques last month. Source
  • Firefighter brings nearly dead dog back to life

    World News CTV News
    BAKERSFIELD, Calif. - A California fire department says a little white dog named Jack is recovering after a firefighter rescued him from a burning home and brought him back to life. In a video posted to the Bakersfield Fire Department's website that has been widely shared online, firefighter Matt Smith is shown on Wednesday carrying the nearly lifeless shih tzu from a house. Source
  • Former escort gets 16 years for trying to hire hit man

    World News Toronto Sun
    WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — A former Florida escort convicted of trying to hire a hit man to murder her newlywed husband was sentenced Friday to 16 years in prison, perhaps ending a drawn-out case that drew notice for its startling videos and salacious characters. Source
  • Hawaii prepares for 'unlikely' North Korea missile threat

    World News CTV News
    HONOLULU -- Hawaii is the first state to prepare the public for the possibility of a ballistic missile threat from North Korea. The state's Emergency Management Agency on Friday announced a public education campaign. Source
  • Poland's senators to vote on controversial court overhaul

    World News CTV News
    WARSAW, Poland -- Poland's Senate was poised Friday to approve legislation that would give politicians substantial influence over the country's Supreme Court -- a move that critics say would defy the principles of the European Union. Source
  • BC Hydro CEO Jessica McDonald fired

    Canada News CBC News
    The BC Hydro board of directors has fired CEO Jessica McDonald as the new NDP government continues to make changes after being sworn into office earlier this week. On Thursday, Kenneth Peterson was appointed chair of the BC Hydro board, replacing former Liberal adviser Brad Bennett. Source