Trump, Clinton hope for frontrunner status in S.C., Nev. primaries

CHARLESTON, S.C., United States -- Today could be the day everyone starts using the F-word to describe Donald Trump. And that people stop using it to describe Hillary Clinton.

See Full Article

Frontrunner.

Voters will cast ballots in two races that could shape the U.S. presidential primaries leading into Super Tuesday -- Republicans are voting today in South Carolina, and Democrats in Nevada.

Victory by Trump could make him the clear Republican frontrunner, by historical standards: Nobody in the modern era has won New Hampshire and South Carolina, then gone on to lose.

He expressed awareness in his last campaign rally that winning isn't the only thing that matters today. The vote totals for each candidate will also set the stage for March 1, when 12 states vote in Super Tuesday.

Trump urged his supporters not to take for granted his lead in South Carolina surveys, and asked every single one of them to get out and vote.

"The polls are very nice -- but who knows. We can't take a chance," Trump said.

"And the more we can win by, the bigger the mandate, the better it is."

Republicans will be watching the results closely, at a stage in the race where major candidates start dropping out and donors and supporters must decide whom to back.

The most important outcome in South Carolina could involve the fourth- and fifth-place Republican positions. If candidates like John Kasich, Jeb Bush, and Marco Rubio keep it close enough, it's more likely they'll remain in the race -- which could keep the anti-Trump vote fragmented, with Trump benefiting from the split.

Pressure is mounting from donors and the party establishment for also-rans to drop out, so that the party brass can rally around a more mainstream candidate who could defeat Trump and firebrand conservative Ted Cruz.

Cruz, on his last full day of campaigning in South Carolina, wasn't willing to predict a Trump victory despite the big poll lead. He reminded supporters that he'd managed an upset in Iowa.

"(Before Iowa) it was Trump, Trump, Trump, Trump, Trump, Trump," Cruz told a rally. "We ended up winning more votes than any Republican in the history of the Iowa caucuses."

He was applauded by a crowd that is far more ideologically conservative than Trump who, like his fans, tends to cherry-pick policy preferences from left and right.

Trump, for his part, called for a boycott of Apple products Friday because of the company's unwillingness to help federal investigators access the phones of terrorists.

A few people clapped at the line. Many more people in the room snapped pictures of Trump with their iPhones.

Trump's defence of torture got far more applause. He called waterboarding "minor, minor" torture -- and when describing how he felt about the now-abandoned tactic he said, "I feel great about it."

He also approvingly shared a story about an early 20th-century general who allegedly shot Muslim enemies with bullets dipped in pig's blood, to discourage others. The story appears to be an urban legend.

On the Democratic side, Hillary Clinton faces a big test in Nevada.

Her huge lead has disappeared. The polls are tight.

A loss here would be more worrisome for her than the rout she suffered in New Hampshire, because this state is more ethnically diverse -- with more minority voters, who are supposedly Clinton's firewall against a surprising challenge from socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders.

The state's best-known political analyst offered his own view of the stakes.

"Forget polls," Jon Ralston tweeted.

"Pretty simple: If (Clinton) loses diverse (Nevada) after having (a) great organization, all major endorsements, huge last-minute blitz, very ominous."

She retains a big lead with African-American voters and is expected to win next week in South Carolina and other southeastern states on March 1.

But until recently she also had a huge lead in Nevada, which has a large Latino population -- and that lead has disappeared.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Protestors, police clash again in bitter fight for Venezuela's constitution

    World News CBC News
    Protesters rallied Saturday in the Venezuelan capital for a march toward the embattled nation's Supreme Court, chanting slogans opposing President Nicolas Maduro's plan to rewrite the constitution. Organizers hope the opposition-led demonstration will send a forceful message to Maduro to cancel a July 30 election for delegates to a constitutional assembly that would be tasked with overhauling the nation's charter. Source
  • Fire burning near Banff covers 4,100 hectares: Parks Canada

    Canada News CTV News
    BANFF, Alta. -- Parks Canada says it has been able to get a better idea of the size of a wildfire that's been burning close to Banff. The agency says its fire management personnel were able to fly around the perimeter of the Verdant Creek fire on Friday and determined it covers approximately 4,100 hectares. Source
  • Indigenous Games: Akwesasne athlete inspires women by breaking barriers

    Canada News CBC News
    Kawehnokwiio Bailey Thomas buried her face in her jersey as tears came down the side of her face. She and team Eastern Door and the North (EDN) fell in straight sets to team Newfoundland and Labrador to finish 10th in the U19 female volleyball competition at the North American Indigenous Games (NAIG). Source
  • Minneapolis police chief tasked with changing culture promoted from within

    World News CTV News
    People who have worked closely with the man tapped to lead Minneapolis' embattled police department say he has qualities that would suit him well in the role: He's friendly, seems forthright, has deep roots in the city and is African-American, which could help improve the sour relationship between the police force and the city's sizeable black community. Source
  • British Columbia teen becomes youngest Canadian to swim English Channel

    Canada News CBC News
    B.C. teen Emily Epp has become the youngest Canadian to swim across the English Channel. On July 15, Epp slipped into the channel and left the Cliffs of Dover in her rear view. She arrived at Cap Gris Nez in France 11 hours and 57 minutes later, making her the 43rd Canadian to conquer the challenge since 1951, according to the Channel Swimming Association. Source
  • Four tornadoes touch down in Saskatchewan, another two reported

    Canada News CTV News
    Environment Canada has confirmed that four tornadoes touched down in Saskatchewan on Friday. The tornadoes did not cause any damage, according to Environment Canada, but warnings were issued due to the surrounding storms. Another two tornadoes were reported, photographed and posted on social media. Source
  • Liberals punted on 1st down with $10.5M Omar Khadr settlement

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    When Peter Kent wrote the opinion piece for the Wall Street Journal that tipped off sleeping Americans to the Omar Khadr payoff, he wrote not as a Conservative MP but as the journalist he once was. This is why it resonated so strongly, and suddenly became the top news item on many U.S. Source
  • U.S. kills 12 Afghan police in airstrike amid violent clashes with Taliban

    World News CBC News
    An errant U.S. airstrike confirmed by the Pentagon killed 12 Afghan National Police officers and wounded two others, as another 11 police were killed and six wounded in clashes with the Taliban, Afghan officials said Saturday. Source
  • U.S. airstrike kills 12 Afghan police officers

    World News Toronto Sun
    KABUL — An errant U.S. airstrike confirmed by the Pentagon killed 12 Afghan National Police officers and wounded two others, as another 11 police were killed and six wounded in clashes with the Taliban, Afghan officials said Saturday. Source
  • Sean Spicer thought 'SNL' skits were 'funny'

    World News Toronto Sun
    Soon to be ex-White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer admits he likes a good joke. In his first interview since he resigned from his post on Friday, Spicer told Fox News' Sean Hannity that Saturday Night Live's parody of him was humourous at times. Source