Australian wins World Press Photo award for migrants image

AMSTERDAM -- A haunting image of migrants passing a baby underneath a razor-wire fence on the Serbian-Hungarian border won the prestigious World Press Photo award for 2015 on Thursday -- even though it had never been published.

See Full Article

Australian freelance photographer Warren Richardson made the moonlit image on Aug. 28 and said he offered it to two news organizations, neither of which responded.

Jury members, however, saw something special in the black-and-white image. Vaughn Wallace, deputy photo editor for Al Jazeera America, said the image is "incredibly powerful visually, but it's also very nuanced."

The photo, he said, "causes you to stop and consider the man's face, consider the child. You see the sharpness of the barbed wire and the hands reaching out from the darkness."

Richardson said he did not carry any equipment to transmit his images while he spent days camping near the Hungarian border crossing at Roszke to document the passage of the migrants fleeing conflict, poverty and persecution in the Middle East and Africa. He said the delay in sending out his images from his home in Budapest may have been to blame for the lack of interest.

"Sometimes, it's first in, first served, and I understand that theory," he said. "I can't blame anyone else but myself. But at the end of the day the picture talks for itself."

"I would have thought straight away, 'Yeah, this will definitely be published,"' he said. "But I didn't think like this."

It was so dark when he took the picture that Richardson did not even realize the migrants were passing a baby under the fence until he looked at the image on his computer. He checked the photos only once he got home to preserve his camera's battery.

"Had I used a flash, I would have given their position away to the Hungarian police," Richardson said.

The image won top prize in the contest, which drew 82,951 images from 5,775 photographers. It also won the Spot News Singles category.

Last year's competition was overshadowed by the disqualification of a winner who admitted that one in a series of pictures about the Belgian city of Charleroi was actually taken in Brussels, and by controversy surrounding the pictures of the gritty, post-industrial Charleroi.

Lars Boering, managing director of the World Press Photo Foundation, said the contest set up a new code of ethics for this year's contest to ensure the integrity of images. He praised photographers for largely sticking to it, saying there were more checks and "fewer problems" than last year.

"We see that the photographers are as committed as we are to providing accurate and fair images on the world's most important events and issues," he said.

Several winners in the news categories focused on the migrant crisis and one of its root causes, the devastating civil war in Syria.

But the contest's wide range of categories also provided an eclectic mix of other subjects ranging from wrestlers in Senegal to ice hockey players in Russia, and from people diving with whales to orangutans climbing trees.

Japanese photographer Kazuma Obara won the People Stories category for a series of pictures shot on old Ukrainian film depicting the life of a woman affected by radiation from the Chornobyl nuclear disaster. Associated Press photographer Daniel Ochoa de Olza won second place for portraits of young Spanish girls sitting in decorated altars as part of a festival. Ochoa also took third place for photos showing raindrops covering portraits of victims of the Nov. 13 Paris attacks that were left at a street memorial.

Americans swept the top three places in the long-term projects category. Mary F. Calvert won for a series of photos dealing with sexual assault in the American military. Nancy Borowick took second place for a series of photos documenting her parents' battle with cancer. And David Guttenfelder was awarded third place for a series of pictures from North Korea, the bulk of which were made when he was a regular visitor to that country as a staff photographer for The Associated Press.

The New York Times won three categories -- General News Singles, General News Stories and Daily Life Stories -- and Times photographers placed third in General News Stories and second in Daily Life Singles. French agency Agence France-Presse won the three top placings in Spot News Stories and a second place in General News.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Sanctions disrupting humanitarian aid to North Korea, UN report says

    World News CTV News
    TOKYO - International sanctions on North Korea are taking a serious toll on humanitarian aid activities, according to a United Nations-led report. The report issued this week by the UN's senior resident official in Pyongyang said sanctions are inadvertently hindering legitimate operations on the ground and have indirectly contributed to a "radical decline" in donations it said are badly needed by millions of North Korean women and children. Source
  • Parents of 'no-fly list kids' upset at no funding for redress system

    Canada News CBC News
    Parents of children whose names are on Canada's no-fly lists are upset that no funding from the federal budget has been allocated towards a redress system. "By not funding the establishment of a redress system, the federal government continues to leave at risk the families of over 60 Canadian children of various races, religions, backgrounds and creeds who came forward and hundreds more still afraid to do so," a group called No-Fly List Kids said in a statement released on Twitter…
  • Canada faces risk of homegrown terrorists using vehicles: security experts

    Canada News CTV News
    Security experts say Canada is at risk of homegrown terrorists using vehicles as weapons, following the London attack and reports that a Canadian suspected of ties to ISIS has been arrested in Turkey. In Tuesday’s London attack, 52-year-old Khalid Masood used a rented car to strike pedestrians on Westminster Bridge before crashing the vehicle into a gate. Source
  • Sally Armstrong talks to Lisa LaFlamme about Kenya's fight against rape

    Canada News CTV News
    Canadian journalist Sally Armstrong is documenting efforts to combat a widespread culture of rape in Kenya, where one third of girls fall victim before the age of 18. “Justice Clubs” teach children about their right to be protected from rape. Source
  • U.S., 13 other nations demand Venezuela hold elections soon

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The United States and group of 13 nations across the Americas on Thursday called on Venezuela's government to hold elections and immediately free political prisoners, setting up a potential diplomatic showdown with President Nicolas Maduro's socialist administration. Source
  • Single mom recovering from triple amputation brought on by rare strep throat

    World News Toronto Sun
    WINNIPEG — A Winnipeg woman is recovering in hospital after developing a rare type of strep throat that forced doctors to amputate both her legs and one of her arms. Cari Kirkness, 28, thought she had come down with the flu when she went to the emergency room at Health Sciences Centre last month. Source
  • Hawaii judge who blocked travel ban target of threats

    World News Toronto Sun
    THE ASSOCIATED PRESS First posted: Thursday, March 23, 2017 09:34 PM EDT | Updated: Thursday, March 23, 2017 09:54 PM EDT Source
  • Investigator who leaked chokehold officer's records resigns

    World News CTV News
    NEW YORK -- A police watchdog agency investigator who leaked the disciplinary record of a white police officer involved in the chokehold death of unarmed black man Eric Garner resigned on Thursday. The investigator, who was not publicly identified, worked for the Civilian Complaint Review Board for less than a year and had no role in the investigation of any of the disciplinary cases against Officer Daniel Pantaleo that were leaked to the website Thinkprogress.org, the board said. Source
  • 4 dead in Sacramento home, suspect detained in San Francisco

    World News Toronto Sun
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Police found four people, including two children, dead Thursday in a California home and a suspect was in custody, officials said. The four victims were discovered when police broke into the Sacramento home after a relative reported that something might be wrong. Source
  • Snorer in chief?

    World News Toronto Sun
    Washington gossips are agog over reports the new president and first lady have separate bedrooms. The revelation is on the front of the latest US Weekly. The cover photos are of Melania and Donald Trump looking like they just bit down on a lemon. Source