Syrian man behind deadly Ankara car bomb, Turkey says

ANKARA, Turkey - A Syrian national with links to Syrian Kurdish militia carried out the suicide bombing in Ankara that targeted military personnel and killed at least 28 people and wounded dozens of others, Turkey's prime minister said Thursday, and vowed to retaliate against these groups.

See Full Article

Ahmet Davutoglu told reporters during a visit to Turkey's chief of military staff that the Syrian man he identified as Sahih Neccar, had carried out the attack in co-operation with Turkey's own outlawed Kurdish rebel group.

Authorities had detained nine people in connection with the attacks and were trying to identify others. Turkey's military, meanwhile, said its jets conducted cross-border raids against Kurdish rebel positions in northern Iraq, hours after the Ankara attack, striking at a group of about 60-70 rebels of the Kurdistan Workers' Party, or PKK.

"It has been determined with certainty that this attack was carried out by members of the separatist terror organization together with a member of the YPG who infiltrated from Syria," Davutoglu said, referring to the Kurdistan Workers' Party, known as the PKK, as well as the Syrian Kurdish militia group, the People's Protection Units.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack, which killed military personnel and civilians, although suspicion had immediately fallen on the PKK or the Islamic State group.

The leader of the main Syrian Kurdish group, Salih Muslim, denied that his group was behind the Ankara attack and warned Turkey against taking Syria ground action.

The car bomb went off late Wednesday in Turkey's capital during evening rush hour. It exploded near buses carrying military personnel that had stopped at traffic lights, in an area close to parliament and armed forces headquarters and lodgings. The blast was the second deadly bombing in Ankara in four months.

Davutoglu said Syria's government, which he accused of backing Syrian Kurdish militias, is also to blame. And in an apparent reference to the U.S., he called on Turkey's allies to stop its support for the Syrian Kurdish group.

Turkey regards the Syrian Democratic Union Party, and its military wing, the People's Protection Units, as terrorists because of their affiliation to Turkey's outlawed Kurdish rebel group. The Kurdish militia, however, has been fighting the Islamic State group, alongside the United States.

"Those who directly or indirectly back an organization that is the enemy of Turkey, risk losing the title of being a friend of Turkey," Davutoglu said, in an apparent reference to Washington. "It is out of the question for us to excuse a terror organization that threatens the capital of our country."

Earlier, Yeni Safak, a newspaper close to the government, said the bomber had registered as a refugee in Turkey and Turkish authorities were able to identify him from his fingerprints.

In October, suicide bombings blamed on IS targeted a peace rally outside the main train station in Ankara, killing 102 people in Turkey's deadliest attack in years.

The attack drew international condemnation and Turkish leaders have vowed to find those responsible and to retaliate against them with force.

The military said Thursday that Turkish jets attacked PKK positions in northern Iraq's Haftanin region, hitting the group of rebels which it said included a number of senior PKK leaders. The claim couldn't be verified.

Turkey's air force has been striking PKK positions in northern Iraq since a fragile two-and-a-half year-old peace process with the group collapsed in July, reigniting a fierce three-decade old conflict.

"Our determination to retaliate to attacks that aim against our unity, togetherness and future grows stronger with every action," President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Wednesday. "It must be known that Turkey will not refrain from using its right to self-defence at all times."

The attack came at a tense time when the Turkish government is facing an array of challenges. Hundreds of people have been killed in renewed fighting following the collapse of the peace process and tens of thousands have been displaced.

Turkey has also been helping efforts led by the U.S. to combat the Islamic State group in neighbouring Syria, and has faced several deadly bombings in the last year that were blamed on IS.

The Syrian war is raging along Turkey's southern border. Recent airstrikes by Russian and Syrian forces have prompted tens of thousands of Syrian refugees to flee to Turkey's border.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Verdict expected in inquest into Ontario firefighter deaths

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO - A verdict is expected today in a coroner's inquest looking into the deaths of two Ontario men during firefighter training exercises. Adam Brunt, a firefighting student, and Gary Kendall, a veteran volunteer firefighter, died five years apart during ice rescue courses involving the same training company. Source
  • NATO members wait to hear where Trump stands on alliance's existence

    World News CBC News
    The new headquarters of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization — a massive, state-of-the-art facility that cost more than a billion euros to build — was designed to help the military alliance step boldly into the future. Source
  • Soldliers flow into besieged Philippine city in effort to restore control

    World News CTV News
    MARAWI, Philippines -- Army tanks packed with soldiers have rolled into a southern Philippine city to try to restore control after militants linked to Islamic State group launched a violent siege. Thousands of civilians have been fleeing the city of some 200,000 people. Source
  • Soldiers flow into besieged Philippine city in effort to restore control

    World News CTV News
    MARAWI, Philippines - Army tanks packed with soldiers rolled into a southern Philippine city Thursday to try to restore control after ISIS-linked militants launched a violent siege that sent thousands of people fleeing for their lives and raised fears of extremists gaining traction in the country. Source
  • Police make 2 more arrests over Manchester bombing

    World News CBC News
    Police have arrested two more people and are searching a new site in Manchester, U.K., suspected of links to the bombing that killed 22 people at a pop concert. Greater Manchester Police say two men were arrested overnight in Manchester and in the Withington area in the south of the city. Source
  • Firefighters fighting 6 alarm blaze at Toronto recycling facility

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO - Firefighters were battling a large blaze at a recycling facility near Toronto's waterfront early Thursday. There was no word of any injuries in the six-alarm blaze (at Cherry St. and Commissioners St. Source
  • Firefighters battling large blaze at Toronto recycling facility

    Canada News CBC News
    Firefighters were battling a large blaze at a recycling facility near Toronto's waterfront early Thursday. There was no word of any injuries in the six-alarm blaze at Cherry Street and Commissioners Street. GFL fire in Toronto now a 5 Alarm blaze. Source
  • Soldiers roll into Philippine city besieged by ISIS-linked militants

    World News CBC News
    Army tanks packed with soldiers rolled into a southern Philippine city Thursday as gunfire and explosions rang out after militants linked to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria group torched buildings, seized more than a dozen Catholic hostages and raised their black flag. Source
  • Trump set to meet with concerned NATO, EU leaders

    World News CTV News
    BRUSSELS - Visiting a city he once called a "hellhole" to meet with the leaders of an alliance he threatened to abandon, U.S. President Donald Trump will be in the heart of Europe on Thursday to address a continent still reeling from his election and anxious about his support. Source
  • Reporter alleges Montana Republican hopeful body-slammed him

    World News CTV News
    BOZEMAN, Mont. - Witnesses said the Republican candidate for Montana's sole congressional seat body-slammed a reporter Wednesday, the day before the polls close in the nationally watched special election. Greg Gianforte was in a private office preparing for an interview with Fox News when Guardian newspaper reporter Ben Jacobs came in without permission, campaign spokesman Shane Scanlon said. Source