U.S. stealth jets fly over South Korea amid North Korea standoff

OSAN AIR BASE, Korea, Republic Of - Four U.S. F-22 stealth fighters flew over South Korea on Wednesday in a clear show of power against North Korea, a day after South Korea's president warned of the North's collapse amid a festering standoff over its nuclear and missile ambitions.

See Full Article

The high-tech planes capable of sneaking past radar undetected were seen by an Associated Press photographer before they landed at Osan Air Base near Seoul. They were escorted by other U.S. and South Korean fighter jets.

Pyongyang will likely view the arrival of the planes as a threat as they are an apparent display of U.S. airpower aimed at showing what the United States can do to defend its ally South Korea from potential aggression from North Korea.

The United States often sends powerful warplanes to South Korea in times of tension with North Korea. Last month it sent a nuclear-capable B-52 bomber to South Korea after North Korea defiantly conducted its fourth nuclear test.

The international standoff over North Korea deepened earlier this month when Pyongyang ignored repeated warnings by regional powers and fired a long-range rocket carrying what it calls an Earth observation satellite. Washington, Seoul and others consider the launch a prohibited test of missile technology.

Foreign analysts say the North's rocket launch and nuclear test put the country further along it its quest for a nuclear-armed missile that could reach the U.S. mainland.

South Korea's president on Tuesday warned North Korea faces collapse if it doesn't abandon its nuclear bomb program, an unusually strong broadside that is certain to infuriate Pyongyang.

In a speech at parliament, President Park Geun-hye said South Korea will take unspecified "stronger and more effective" measures to make North Korea realize its nuclear ambitions will result only in accelerating its "regime collapse."

Park made the speech while defending her government's decision to shut down a jointly run factory park in North Korea in response to the North's rocket launch. Pyongyang retaliated by expelling all the South Koreans there, put its military in charge of the area and cut off key communication hotlines between the Koreas.

It is unusual for a top South Korean official to publicly touch on such a government collapse because of worries about how sensitive North Korea is to talk of its authoritarian government losing power. Pyongyang has long accused Washington and Seoul agitating for its collapse.

After the rocket launch, Seoul announced that talks would begin with Washington on deploying a sophisticated U.S. missile defence system in South Korea and that the allies' annual military drills in the spring will be the biggest ever.

The deployment of the Terminal High-Altitude Area Defence, or THAAD, is opposed by North Korea, China and Russia. Opponents say the system could help U.S. radar spot missiles in other countries.

Pyongyang has also called regular U.S.-South Korea military exercises a rehearsal for a northward invasion. The allies say their drills are defensive in nature.

-----

Associated Press writer Hyung-jin Kim contributed to this report from Seoul.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • California court hears tales of shackled, starved children

    World News CTV News
    RIVERSIDE, Calif. - Two pale, malnourished girls are photographed shackled to bunk beds. Their sister, who surreptitiously snapped the photos, is heard pleading in a 911 call for someone to come and save her siblings. Source
  • Trump's immigration order sparks confusion

    World News CTV News
    EDINBURG, Texas – U.S. President Donald Trump's reversal of a policy separating migrant families at the Mexico border sparked confusion over how the new guidelines will play out and deep concern that the changes don't go far enough, allowing children to still be held in detention even if they remain with their families. Source
  • New Zealand PM gives birth to baby girl

    World News CTV News
    New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, right, addresses Parliament in Wellington, New Zealand on May 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Nick Perry) Source
  • Defence demands preservation of Parkland school shooting evidence

    World News CTV News
    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Defence attorneys for Florida school shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz are asking a judge to order investigators to preserve most evidence in the case, except for the building where the Valentine's Day massacre took place. Source
  • North Korea summits bring sense of peace to DMZ

    World News CTV News
    PANMUNJOM, Korea, Democratic People's Republic Of - Lt. Col. Hwang Myong Jin has been a guide on the northern side of the Demilitarized Zone that divides the two Koreas for five years. He says it's gotten quieter here since the summits between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and the presidents of South Korea and the United States, in perhaps the last place on earth where the Cold War still burns hot. Source
  • Young immigrants detained in Virginia detention centre allege abuse

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON - Immigrant children as young as 14 housed at a juvenile detention centre in Virginia say they were beaten while handcuffed and locked up for long periods in solitary confinement, left nude and shivering in concrete cells. Source
  • Ivanka Trump finally breaks silence to thank father for border action

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON - Ivanka Trump, the presidential adviser who has billed herself as a "force for good" in the administration, remained silent for days as the firestorm over forced separations of migrant families consumed the White House. Source
  • Hundreds wait at Indonesia lake as search for bodies resumes

    World News CTV News
    Relatives of victims of a sunken ferry inspect the passenger name list name at the Tigaras port in Toba lake, North Sumatra, Wednesday, June, 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara) Source
  • Penn. police fatally shoot 17-year-old boy fleeing traffic stop

    World News CTV News
    PITTSBURGH - A police officer fatally shot a 17-year-old boy just seconds after he fled from a traffic stop late Tuesday in a confrontation partly captured on video from a nearby home. Investigators said Wednesday that the car stopped in the town of East Pittsburgh matched the description of a vehicle being sought in a nonfatal shooting in a town a few miles away. Source
  • CO2 shortage could leave beer drinkers flat

    World News CBC News
    ?No beer at this time of year? A British trade group says there's a shortage of carbon dioxide in northern Europe, sparking fears that drinks may lack fizz just as thirsty soccer fans fill pubs for the World Cup. Source