Pope Francis kicks off first trip to Mexico

MEXICO CITY -- Pope Francis kicks off his first trip to Mexico on Saturday with speeches to the country's political and ecclesial elites, riding in on the success of his historic meeting in Cuba with the head of the Russian Orthodox Church.

See Full Article

During a three-hour stop in Havana on Friday, Francis embraced Patriarch Kirill and with an exclamation of "finally" took a momentous step toward closing a nearly 1,000-year schism in Christianity.

The two religious leaders signed a 30-point joint declaration of religious unity that committed their churches to overcoming their differences. Francis tweeted that the meeting was a "gift from God."

Francis and Kirill also called for political leaders to act on the single most important issue of shared concern between the Catholic and Orthodox churches today: the plight of Christians in Iraq and Syria who are being killed and driven from their homes by the Islamic State group.

"In many countries of the Middle East and North Africa, entire families of our brothers and sisters in Christ are being exterminated, entire villages and cities," the declaration said

Later aboard his plane, Francis said the declaration was not a political statement, but rather a pastoral one. It came from "two bishops who met and discussed their pastoral concerns," he said.

The focus quickly shifted to Francis' five-day Mexico visit, which will include a very personal prayer before the Virgin of Guadalupe shrine, the largest and most important Marian shrine in the world and one that is particularly important to the first Latin American pope.

As he flew toward Mexico City, Francis said his "most intimate desire" is to pray before the dark-skinned Madonna. She is the patron saint of Mexico and "empress of the Americas," and millions of pilgrims flock each year to pray before the cloak that bears her image.

Francis arrived in Mexico's capital to adoring crowds waving yellow handkerchiefs. Mariachis serenaded as his chartered plane pulled to a stop.

President Enrique Pena Nieto, suffering the lowest approval ratings of a Mexican leader in a quarter century, and his wife met Francis on a red carpet.

Onlookers roared as the three walked together, then the lights dimmed and the crowd waved lights as the official song composed for Francis' visit played. Men in broad sombreros and women in flowing red skirts danced on the tarmac.

Faithful bundled against the evening chill lined up along the route to the Vatican ambassador's residence to catch a glimpse of the pope in an open-air popemobile.

At one spot, people chanted in rhyming Spanish: "You see him, you feel him, the pope is present!" and "Francis, friend, the whole world loves you!"

Tania Vasquez came with her 6-year-old son, Carlos, and other relatives. She held a pennant with the colours of the Mexican flag and images of Francis, a dove and the Virgin of Guadalupe.

"He's coming to talk tough to us," Vasquez said. "In Mexico there are a lot of economic and security problems, there is a lot of egoism, and he comes with a message of peace and hope that we need."

At one point the motorcade paused when a man ran toward the popemobile, but he was detained by security officers before reaching it and the convoy moved on.

As the pope passed her, Mariana Dieguez was moved to tears and had difficulty speaking.

"I feel like my heart could jump from my chest. He comes to give us peace because we are living a difficult moment," she said, alluding to a month-old grandson who was born ill.

On Saturday, Francis meets with Mexican officials and foreign ambassadors at the National Palace. The speech, which is a fixture of every papal trip, is usually the pope's most political message, and Francis is expected to touch on some of the grave problems facing Mexico stemming from drug violence, migration and poverty.

On Friday, Francis expressed his sorrow to the archbishop of the northern city of Monterrey and asked that his deepest sympathies be conveyed to the families of 49 prison inmates killed in a riot one day earlier. The pope is scheduled to visit a prison in the border city of Juarez during his visit.

The pope also will speak to Mexico's bishops at the Cathedral of the Assumption. He is expected to urge them to be close to their people and accompany them through their hardships, amid criticism even from within the Mexican clergy that many in the church here are often highly deferential to the wealthy and powerful.

Francis wraps up his day with a Mass at the Basilica of the Virgin of Guadalupe and a silent prayer before the icon.

According to tradition, the Virgin appeared before the Indian peasant Juan Diego in 1531 at Tepeyac, a hillside near Mexico City where Aztecs worshipped a mother-goddess, and her image was miraculously imprinted on his cloak.

The image helped priests inculcate Catholicism among indigenous Mexicans during Spanish colonial rule, and the church later made her patron of all the Americas. Juan Diego was canonized as the hemisphere's first Indian saint in 2002 during the papacy of John Paul II.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • District docked pay for Parkland principal who lost daughter

    World News CTV News
    Sara Smith, left, and her daughter Karina Smith visit a makeshift memorial outside the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 students and faculty were killed in a mass shooting on Wednesday, in Parkland, Fla., Monday, Feb. Source
  • Trump won't say if he has confidence in his deputy attorney general

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- U.S. President Donald Trump declined to say Tuesday whether he has confidence in Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, escalating pressure on the Justice Department as his White House negotiated rare access to classified documents for his congressional allies. Source
  • Teacher beats Kentucky House majority leader in GOP primary

    World News CTV News
    LANCASTER, Ky. -- A high school math teacher ousted the majority leader of the Kentucky House of Representatives on Tuesday, with a narrow win in the GOP primary race. Travis Brenda credited a groundswell of teacher support for the win and said it sends a message that teachers and public workers won't be silent. Source
  • Elderly North Korean spies jailed in South hope summit sets them free

    World News CTV News
    GWANGJU, Korea, Republic Of -- He's spent nearly six decades trapped on enemy soil, surviving 29 years in a prison where he was tortured by South Korean guards before being released to a life of poverty and police surveillance. Source
  • Reporting undocumented students is a local decision: U.S. education secretary

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said Tuesday that decisions on whether to report undocumented students to authorities rest with local communities. DeVos was asked during a congressional hearing whether teachers or principals should notify authorities that a student is undocumented. Source
  • Michigan House changes Nassar bills after legal settlement

    World News CTV News
    LANSING, Mich. -- The Michigan House on Tuesday scaled back legislation inspired by the Larry Nassar sexual assault scandal, dropping certain measures addressed by last week's $500 million settlement between Michigan State University and hundreds of Nassar's victims and revising the time limits that survivors of childhood abuse would have to sue. Source
  • North Korean media return to angry tone as summit looms

    World News CBC News
    North Korean media stepped up their rhetorical attacks on South Korea and its joint military exercises with the United States, warning Tuesday that a budding detente could be in danger. State media unleashed three strongly worded commentaries slamming Seoul and Washington for the manoeuvres and demanding Seoul take action against defectors it claimed were sending anti-North Korea propaganda leaflets across the border. Source
  • Court boots 30-year-old son from parents' house

    World News CBC News
    An upstate New York judge Tuesday ordered a 30-year-old man to move out of his parents' house after they went to court to have him ejected. Michael Rotondo told the judge he knows his parents want him out of the split-level ranch they share. Source
  • Pilots push for shorter flight times as government finalizes new safety regulations

    Canada News CBC News
    When two Air Canada pilots mistook a San Francisco taxiway for a runway and almost crashed their plane into four fully-fuelled airliners awaiting takeoff last summer, they told investigators they were fatigued at the time. Being tired behind the controls of an aircraft is the number one safety concern pilots say they face on the job. Source
  • Sweden hands out brochure in case of 'crisis or war'

    World News CBC News
    Sweden is distributing an updated version of a Cold War-era civil emergency advice booklet to some 4.8 million households about what to do in the event of a crisis, including war. The 20-page brochure titled If Crisis or War Comes is about getting the country "better prepared" if public services have been debilitated by accidents, severe weather, IT attacks or "in the worst-case scenario, war," the Civil Contingencies Agency said. Source