Clinton, Sanders debate as focus turns to minority voters

COLUMBIA, S.C. -- Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders debated again Thursday night as the focus turned to minority voters influential in contests later this month in South Carolina and Nevada.

See Full Article

Clinton's loss to Sanders in the New Hampshire primary by 22 percentage points was especially painful because she lost with women, her presumed base of support as she tries to become the country's first female president.

With Nevada next, Sanders now faces a test of how he does with non-white voters after the largely white states of Iowa and New Hampshire. Nevada is 28 per cent Latino, 9 per cent African-American and 8 per cent Asian-American.

The Vermont senator's message of economic and social inequality, systemic racism and unlimited money in politics is aimed at Americans who feel the system is stacked against them.

Clinton has acknowledged she has "work to do" to introduce herself to young women and new voters. She is expected to attack Sanders more aggressively on issues that matter to minority voters, defending policies like the health care law achieved by President Barack Obama, the nation's first black president.

On Thursday, the political action committee of the Congressional Black Caucus endorsed Clinton. The committee is separate from the Congressional Black Caucus, not all of whom have endorsed Clinton.

Sanders was expected to talk at length about the civil rights activism of his youth, his recent outreach to prominent black figures and parts of his agenda that might most resonate with black and Hispanic communities. He had breakfast with civil rights leader the Rev. Al Sharpton on Wednesday.

Civil rights leader John Lewis on Thursday dismissed Sanders' claims of his 1960s work on racial equality, saying, "I never saw him. I never met him." On his campaign website, Sanders says he has a "long history of fighting for social equality and the rights of black Americans -- a record that goes back to the early 1960s."

If Clinton solidifies her support among black voters over the next month, she could amass a significant number of delegates in the push toward the 2,382 needed to win the party nomination. There are more than 1,400 delegates at stake in states such as South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee and Louisiana.

In the more crowded Republican field, South Carolina is next. Billionaire Donald Trump, fresh from a commanding win in New Hampshire, will be tested by the state's more conservative voters.

A group of Latino celebrities condemned Trump and his Republican presidential rivals, saying Trump speaks for the party's anti-immigrant, anti-Latino agenda.

The group including actress America Ferrera, comedian George Lopez and legendary musician Carlos Santana is urging the nation's 55 million Latinos to "vote for candidates who support our community." It did not endorse either Clinton or Sanders.

Almost all the Republicans have spent months building complex campaigns in South Carolina. After that primary on Feb. 20, seven Southern states including Georgia and Virginia will anchor the Super Tuesday primaries on March 1.

Trump was leading in South Carolina among all demographic groups, an NBC/Marist/Wall Street Journal poll showed, with Cruz and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio a distant second and third.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Recovery and reconstruction go slowly after Mexico quake

    World News CTV News
    MEXICO CITY - Wearing a hardhat, Rodrigo Diaz Mejia steps onto the hood of a crushed car and then gingerly into an apartment cracked open by the Sept. 19 earthquake. Inside he spots a photo of two young boys hanging on a wall spider-webbed with deep cracks. Source
  • China offers conflicting goals as Xi Jinping looks to extend rule

    World News CTV News
    BEIJING - China's ruling Communist Party is expanding its role in business even as it promises freer markets and support for entrepreneurs on the eve of President Xi Jinping's second five-year term as leader. Party officials are tightening their control over state-owned enterprises and want a voice in how some foreign companies are run. Source
  • Texas man’s execution halted amid alleged confession scheme

    World News Toronto Sun
    HUNTSVILLE, Texas — A man who became known as Houston’s “Tourniquet Killer” because of his signature murder technique on four female victims was set for execution Wednesday evening. Anthony Allen Shore confessed to the four slayings after a tiny particle collected from under the fingernail of a 21-year-old murder victim was matched to his DNA. Source
  • Explosion at Indian fireworks factory kills 8

    World News CTV News
    NEW DELHI - An explosion at an unlicensed firecracker factory killed eight workers and injured 20 other people in eastern India as Hindus celebrated their most popular Diwali festival, police said Thursday. A police officer said rescuers cleared debris of the collapsed building in a town in Balasore district in Orissa state on Thursday morning. Source
  • Jury asked to decide if injury that left Paralympian a quadriplegic was from unsafe pool

    Canada News CTV News
    REGINA - A jury in Saskatchewan is being asked to decide whether an injury that left a Paralympian a quadriplegic was a tragic accident or because of an unsafe pool. Miranda Biletski is suing the University of Regina for negligence. Source
  • Prized $50,000 rodeo horse hit and killed after being let loose: RCMP

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    The Mounties were investigating after a prized horse that appeared in Canada's biggest rodeos was hit and killed on a highway near Bonnyville, shortly after a herd was intentionally released from a livestock pen. Early Tuesday, someone opened a gate on a property south of Muriel Lake, RCMP said in a news release. Source
  • Wainwright soldier pleads not guilty to online luring, child porn

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    A Wainwright-based soldier has entered not-guilty pleas to charges related to online luring and child porn. Steven Massey, 32, was arrested and charged in June after a joint investigation by the province's Internet Child Exploitation Unit and U.S. Source
  • Magnitsky human rights law, protections for journalists' sources get royal assent

    Canada News CBC News
    Two private member's bills, one protecting journalists' sources and another that allows Canada to get tough on human rights abusers, received royal assent Wednesday. One of those laws is the so-called Magnitsky Act, the Justice for Victims of Corrupt Foreign Officials Act or Bill S-226. Source
  • Catalonia to press ahead with independence if Spain imposes direct rule

    World News CBC News
    Spain's political showdown with Catalonia is set to reach a new level on Thursday when political leaders in Madrid and Barcelona are expected to make good on pledges made to their supporters to stick to their tough positions over the region's future. Source
  • 'I felt a burning sensation': Hotel guard describes getting shot before Las Vegas massacre

    World News CBC News
    The gunman who unleashed the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history first wounded an unsuspecting hotel security guard in a hallway who promptly radioed for help, according to a TV interview broadcast Wednesday with the guard and a hotel building engineer whose life he is credited with saving. Source