'I was shaking all over': Cruise ship damaged during storm

MIAMI -- A Royal Caribbean cruise ship ran into high winds and rough seas in the Atlantic Ocean on Sunday, forcing frightened passengers into their cabins as their belongings flew about.

See Full Article

Passengers described howling winds and waves as high as 30 feet, but the cruise line says no injuries were reported and the ship suffered minor damage but was safe to remain at sea.

"I was shaking all over," passenger Shara Strand of New York City wrote to The Associated Press via Facebook on Monday. "Panic attack, things like that ... I've been on over 20 cruises, I've been through a hurricane, it was never like this. Never. Everyone is saying they never saw anything like last night."

Sixteen-year-old passenger Gabriella Lairson says she and her father, Sam, could feel the boat begin to sway by 2:30 p.m. The captain directed passengers to their cabins. There, the Lairsons heard glasses shatter in the bathroom, and they put their belongings in drawers and closets to prevent them from flying across the room. They ventured out on the balcony, where Sam Lairson shot video showing wave after wave rising below them.

"The winds were so strong that I thought the phone would blow from my hands," Sam Lairson, of Ocean City, New Jersey, said in an email. "After that we had to keep the doors to the balconies sealed."

The ship, with more than 4,500 guests and 1,600 crew members, was sailing from Cape Liberty, New Jersey and was scheduled to arrive in Port Canaveral, Florida, at noon Monday. The weather will delay that arrival, but Royal Caribbean spokeswoman Cynthia Martinez said in an email that she doesn't have an updated time or schedule. Rosalind Harvey, spokeswoman for Port Canaveral, says officials there have been told the ship will arrive at 7 a.m. Tuesday.

Gabriella Lairson says that by early Monday morning, people were out and about on the ship, checking out the minor damage in some public areas. Some staterooms also were damaged, according to a Royal Caribbean statement.

Lairson praised the crew and captain. "They did everything they could to make us feel comfortable even though they were not allowed to be out around the ship that often," she wrote to The AP on Facebook. "The Captain regularly gave us updates when he could through the whole storm."

Martinez confirmed that passengers were asked to stay in their rooms and said they were given complimentary access to their minibars.

Robert Huschka, the executive editor of the Detroit Free Press, was aboard and started tweeting when the inclement weather hit. He told USA Today that the ordeal was "truly terrifying." He described the cruise director nervously giving updates, and he later posted photos of shattered glass panels on a pool deck.

But Huschka was among passengers who found a silver lining in the storm. On Monday morning, he posted: "The good news? They never lost the Super Bowl signal. Perfect TV picture throughout storm!"

And despite her own worries, Strand said her daughter, 8-month-old Alexa, slept through the entire episode.

Associated Press writers Janelle Cogan in Atlanta and Tamara Lush in Tampa, Florida, contributed



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • ISIS militants destroyed Roman theatre in Palmyra, Syria says

    World News CTV News
    BEIRUT - Islamic State group militants destroyed a landmark ancient Roman monument and parts of the theatre in Syria's historic town of Palmyra, the government and opposition monitoring groups said Friday. Maamoun Abdulkarim, the head of Syria's antiquities department, said the militants destroyed the facade of the second-century theatre along with the Tetrapylon, a cubic-shaped ancient Roman monument that sits in the middle of the colonnade road that leads to the theatre. Source
  • Mexican drug kingpin 'El Chapo' to appear in Brooklyn courtroom

    World News CTV News
    NEW YORK - Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, one of the world's most notorious drug kingpins, is finally headed for a court date the United States sought for two decades while he made brazen prison escapes and spent years on the run in Mexico. Source
  • Why not speaking French is such a disadvantage in Conservative leadership race

    Canada News CBC News
    Can a candidate for the Conservative leadership win the party's top job and become prime minister without speaking French well enough to order a plate of poutine in a brasserie? Kevin O'Leary hopes so — and the poor performances in Tuesday's French-language debate suggest a few of his leadership rivals do, too. Source
  • Prior leaks of navy info were on RCMP's radar prior to vice-admiral's removal

    Canada News CBC News
    The RCMP conducted at least two prior investigations into leaks of sensitive information involving naval projects before this week's suspension of the military's second-highest ranking officer, sources tell CBC News. The revelation comes at the same time the Trudeau government has quietly moved to reassure allies that no foreign intelligence data was compromised in relation to the controversy involving Vice-Admiral Mark Norman. Source
  • Canada sees 'dramatic' spike in online hate — here's what you can do about it

    Canada News CBC News
    The internet can be a pretty intolerant place, and it may be getting worse. An analysis of Canada's online behaviour commissioned by CBC's Marketplace shows a 600 per cent jump in the past year in how often Canadians use language online that's racist, Islamophobic, sexist or otherwise intolerant. Source
  • Cheap airline fares that don't allow carry-on bags coming to Canada, says expert

    Canada News CBC News
    Just when you thought economy air travel couldn't get any more basic, some major U.S. airlines have found a way to make it even less appealing. Both American and United Airlines will soon be offering a bare-bones "basic economy" fare. Source
  • Canada cuts $48M in tariffs to boost food manufacturing

    Canada News CBC News
    As the incoming Trump administration talks about piling on new tariffs to discourage imports and protect American jobs, the Canadian government quietly moved in the opposite direction over the holidays: eliminating tariffs. Why? To support Canadian jobs. Source
  • How history could make strange bedfellows of Obama and Trump: Keith Boag

    World News CBC News
    Don't expect that in his inaugural speech today Donald Trump will bother with a hat tip to Barack Obama for the outgoing president's contribution to his success, although maybe he should. And while it sounds farfetched now, there might also come a day when Obama will be grateful it was Trump and not a purebred Republican who became the custodian of his legacy. Source
  • America descends into brutality as the real-life Archie Bunker is sworn in as president: Neil Macdonald

    World News CBC News
    Taken as a photo, a moment in time, what's about to happen on the steps of the U.S. Capitol is concussive; a palimpsest from a rougher, crueler era that was merely painted over, rather than transformed, by the progressive advances that so many people assumed would continue, inevitably, with every passing year. Source
  • 2,000 trapped overnight as snow cuts off highways in Spain

    World News CTV News
    MADRID - Authorities say some 2,000 people were trapped overnight in vehicles as heavy snowfall cut off several roads in eastern Spain. The army's emergency unit said Friday it was distributing blankets and hot drinks to hundreds of people trapped on the A3 highway linking Madrid to the coastal city of Valencia and on other roads in the region. Source