Clinton calls Flint water crisis 'immoral'

FLINT, Mich. -- Taking a detour from New Hampshire's campaign trail, Hillary Clinton said Sunday that a water crisis in a Michigan city was "immoral" and demanded that Congress approve $200 million in emergency aid to address the community's battle with lead-contaminated water.

See Full Article

The Democratic presidential hopeful made a quick visit to Flint, Michigan, an unusual stop for a candidate trailing in polls against rival Bernie Sanders in the first primary state. Clinton hopes to use a narrower-than-expected loss in Tuesday's primary as a springboard into contests later this month in Nevada and South Carolina.

Clinton said she was making a "personal commitment" to help Flint in a message delivered not only to the congregants at a local Baptist church but also a more heavily-minority electorate in Southern contests that could help her build a foundation for a delegate-by-delegate drive toward the nomination.

"This is not merely unacceptable or wrong, though it is both. What happened in Flint is immoral," Clinton said at House of Prayer Missionary Church. She added: "I will fight for you in Flint no matter how long it takes."

Aides said Clinton was invited by Flint Mayor Karen Weaver to address the crisis of lead-poisoned water, a case that she has cited in Iowa and New Hampshire as an example of racial and economic injustice. It's an issue that resonates among Democrats, particularly African-American voters who play a major role in later contests in South Carolina and a swath of "Super Tuesday" states on March 1.

From the pulpit, Clinton urged Congress to provide $200 million to fix Flint's water system, saying it was "no time for politics as usual."

Clinton narrowly beat Sanders in Iowa's leadoff caucuses last Monday but has trailed the Vermont senator in New Hampshire by large margins. Her aides worry that a big Sanders victory in the state could help him make headway among women and minority voters, important parts of the coalition that twice elected Barack Obama as president.

Sanders' strength with younger voters only heightens the threat he poses to what was once Clinton's decisive national lead.

Stopping at a local Dunkin' Donuts before departing New Hampshire on Sunday morning, Clinton pledged to fight for every vote in New Hampshire, but at least some of her operation is moving on. This weekend, former President Bill Clinton wooed voters in Las Vegas, campaign surrogates knocked doors in San Antonio, and Clinton's aides announced an upcoming meeting with civil rights leaders in New York City.

Clinton aides are trying to make the case that the heavily white and liberal electorates of New Hampshire and Iowa make them outliers in the nomination fight. They say Clinton will find more success in the South Carolina primary on Feb 20 and the Nevada caucuses a week later, where polls show her with a wide lead.

In recent days, she has used the state as a testing ground for new campaign messages targeted at specific groups, with pledges to break "the highest and hardest glass ceiling" and promising young voters that she would "be for them" even if they support Sanders.

Sanders has worked to boost his profile among black voters who make up more than half of the South Carolina electorate.

On Friday, his campaign scheduled a press conference to promote the endorsement of former NAACP President Ben Jealous. Though snow forced the event to be cancelled, Jealous told reporters on a conference call that Sanders "has the courage to confront the institutionalized bias that stains our nation."

Jealous was in South Carolina for campaign events on Saturday with Erica Garner, whose father died in 2014 after a white New York police officer put the black man in a choke hold.

Sanders' backers believe that as African-Americans learn more about the Vermont senator, they will warm to his liberal message. Clinton is one of the best known political figures in the world and has strong backing among Latinos and black voters.

"Before a few weeks ago, I never gave Bernie Sanders the time of day," said South Carolina state Rep. Justin Bamberg, who recently switched his backing from Clinton. "But if you look at Sanders he has been solid as concrete with regards to his passion for racial, social and economic justice."

Thomas reported from Manchester, New Hampshire. Associated Press writers Lisa Lerer in Manchester, New Hampshire and Bill Barrow in Columbia, South Carolina, contributed to this report.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • City costs for Vancouver 4-20 marijuana protest more than $245,000

    Canada News CTV News
    VANCOUVER -- This year's 4-20 marijuana day of protest in Vancouver cost the city more than $245,000. The city says estimates 40,000 people were at Sunset Beach Park and the Vancouver Art Gallery during the April 20 protest. Source
  • FBI investigating Kushner's meetings with Russians: report

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the House oversight committee asked the FBI on Thursday to turn over more documents about former FBI Director James Comey's interactions with the White House and Justice Department, including materials dating back nearly four years to the Obama administration. Source
  • Forklift driver tried to save Manchester attack victim

    World News Toronto Sun
    TALES OF HEROISM AND HEARTACHE On Monday, Manchester saw the utter worst of humanity - and some of the best. Seconds after the bomb exploded, forklift driver Paul Reid selflessly raced back into the building and tried to save the attack’s youngest victim: Saffie Rose Roussos, who was eight and had been separated from her mother. Source
  • Donald Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner now a focus of Russia probe

    World News Toronto Sun
    Investigators are focusing on a series of meetings held by Jared Kushner, U.S. President Donald Trump's son-in-law and an influential White House adviser, as part of their probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and related matters, according to people familiar with the investigation. Source
  • N.S. premier accused of broken promises at debate in Halifax

    Canada News CTV News
    HALIFAX -- Tory Leader Jamie Baillie cast himself Thursday night as the only man who can beat Stephen McNeil, while the Liberal premier implored voters to ignore campaign "negativity" and give him a second mandate. Source
  • 'Terrorist' in body armour crashed stolen tractor-trailer into Bunny Ranch, owner says [Photos]

    World News Toronto Sun
    LAS VEGAS — A man wearing body armour and a mask backed a tractor-trailer through the gate of the Moonlite Bunny Ranch and crashed it into the front door of the famed Nevada brothel featured in the CatHouse reality television show, according to authorities and the brothel’s owner. Source
  • Spry woman jumps on hood of SUV to thwart carjacking

    World News Toronto Sun
    What would you do if someone tried to steal your vehicle right in front of you? For one Wisconsin resident, the answer is simple: Go all Martin Riggs and jump on its hood. Melissa Smith was the victim of an attempted carjacking while filling up at a gas station in downtown Milwaukee Tuesday afternoon. Source
  • Accused Yahoo hacker appealing detention order [Photos]

    World News Toronto Sun
    Accused proxy hacker Karim Baratov will be seeking his freedom at Ontario’s highest court on June 5. Baratov’s lawyers Ravin Pillay and Amedeo DiCarlo filed notice at the Ontario Court of Appeal to rescind the detention order imposed by Justice Alan Whitten last month. Source
  • After Trump pushes him aside, Montenegro's PM calls it 'harmless'

    World News CTV News
    BRUSSELS -- President Donald Trump's push to get in front of the pack at a NATO summit generated indignation in the Balkans and garnered attention on social media -- but the man he shoved aside took it in stride. Source
  • Trudeau suggests defence review will invest more in troops than weaponry

    Canada News CBC News
    When most people envision a defence policy, they think bullets, bombs and battleships, but Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal government appears set to deliver something decidedly different early next month. Much of the advance publicity for the government's long-anticipated statement of military priorities is being run through the soft-focus filter of social issues and supporting troops. Source