With just Clinton and Sanders left, candidates face off in New Hampshire

DURHAM, N.H. -- Fireworks flying in their first one-on-one debate, Hillary Clinton accused Bernie Sanders on Thursday of subjecting her to an "artful smear" while Sanders suggested the former secretary of state was a captive of the political establishment.

See Full Article

It was a markedly more contentious tone than the two candidates set when they last debated before the presidential voting began in Iowa, and it signalled how the race has tightened five days ahead of the first-in-the-nation primary next Tuesday.

The two argued over ideas, over tactics and over who has the liberal credentials to deliver on an agenda of better access to health care, more affordable college and more.

The race for the Democratic nomination, once seen as a sure thing for Clinton, intensified this week after Sanders held the former secretary of state to a whisper-thin margin of victory in Iowa's leadoff caucuses. The tone of their back-and-forth has become increasingly sharp, and the candidates agreed to add four more debates to the primary season schedule, including Thursday's faceoff in Durham.

The debate is the last before Tuesday's first-in-the-nation New Hampshire primary, and Sanders holds a big lead in polls in the state.

It was Clinton who went on the offensive, saying he could never achieve his proposals. Then she took after the Vermont senator for his efforts to cast her as beholden to Wall Street interests because of the campaign donations and speaking fees she's accepted from the financial sector.

"It's time to end the very artful smear that you and your campaign have been carrying out," she said.

Sanders, for his part, suggested her loyalties were colored by a reliance on big corporate donors.

"Secretary Clinton does represent the establishment," he said. "I represent -- I hope -- ordinary Americans."

Clinton may say the right things, he suggested, but "one of the things we should do is not only talk the talk but walk the walk."

On policy matters, Clinton called Sanders' proposals "just not achievable," while Sanders countered that Clinton was willing to settle for less than Americans deserve.

"I do not accept the belief that the United States of America can't do that," Sanders said of his plan for universal health care and of his efforts to take on "the rip-offs of the pharmaceutical industry."

Clinton insisted they both wanted the same thing; "the disagreement is where do we start from and where do we end up."

In fresh evidence of the tightening race, Clinton reported that her campaign had raised $15 million in January -- $5 million less than Sanders and the first time she's been outraised by her opponent. Her finance director called the numbers "a very loud wake-up call" in a fundraising email to supporters.

Benac reported from Washington. Associated Press writer Scott Bauer contributed from Madison, Wisconsin.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • 3 dead, including 2 children, in Mississauga crash

    Canada News CBC News
    An adult and two children died, and three other people were injured in a two-car crash in Mississauga, Ont., late Sunday, Peel Regional Police say. The crash occurred on Winston Churchill Boulevard, north of Queen Elizabeth Way, just before 11 p.m. Source
  • Ex-nurse Wettlaufer expected to address family of 8 victims in sentencing hearing

    Canada News CBC News
    What will the woman who confessed to killing eight elderly nursing home patients say to their grieving family members and friends? Elizabeth Wettlaufer, 49, is expected to address family members of her victims Monday in a Woodstock, Ont. Source
  • Justin Trudeau's approval ratings down since last summer recess: polls

    Canada News CBC News
    Parliament adjourned this week, ending a sitting that has taken a toll on Justin Trudeau's approval ratings. Though a majority of Canadians still approve of the job he is doing as prime minister, that share has decreased significantly since his government approached its first summer recess around this time one year ago. Source
  • Anything for a party, but the idea Canada was born 150 years ago is absurd: Don Pittis

    Canada News CBC News
    Poor Bobby Gimby. The man with the Pied Piper horn chased by children singing his 1967 Centennial anthem CANADA worked like a trooper to squeeze "Confederation" into the song in both English and French. Now the word has been almost forgotten. Source
  • Oil prices take another dive — can the oilpatch take it?

    Canada News CBC News
    The collapse of the oil-services company Sanjel in 2016 was typical of a no-good, terrible year in Alberta. The family-owned company had grown quickly and was carrying too much debt when the price of oil began to crash three years ago. Source
  • Palestinians in Gaza worry they could suffer in simmering Gulf dispute

    World News CBC News
    The purple signs featuring the emblem of Qatar have become a common sight in the southern part of the Gaza Strip, where the government of the tiny Gulf emirate has become a lifeline for many Palestinians, especially the poor. Source
  • Travel ban awaits action by U.S. Supreme Court

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON - Before taking their long summer break, the Supreme Court justices are poised to act on the Trump administration's travel ban and a separation of church and state dispute involving a Missouri church playground. Source
  • U.K. PM Theresa May nears deal to prop up government

    World News CBC News
    British Prime Minister Theresa May drew closer to clinching a deal to prop up her minority government on Monday as she prepared to meet the leader of the Northern Irish Protestant party. After May lost her majority in parliament on June 8 with a failed gamble on a snap election, she is trying to secure the backing of the small Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) and its 10 lawmakers, though talks have dragged on for more than two weeks. Source
  • Canada hard to define but citizens look to celebrate it, poll suggests

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO - What defines Canada? A new survey suggests the answers are as diverse as the country itself. The poll, commissioned by Historica Canada and conducted by Ipsos, asked a number of questions about various aspects of Canadiana ranging from inquiries about the preferred Canadian dinner companion to most effective single word to describe the country. Source
  • Jailed Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo granted medical parole in China

    World News CBC News
    Jailed Chinese Nobel Peace laureate and dissident Liu Xiaobo has been released on medical parole after his May 23 diagnosis of late-stage liver cancer. Liu's lawyer Mo Shaoping told The Associated Press on Monday that Liu was being treated and was in stable condition at China Medical University No. Source