Julian Assange victim of 'arbitrary' detention, Sweden says of UN report

LONDON -- Sweden's foreign ministry said Thursday that a UN advisory panel has concluded that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange's has been a victim of "arbitrary" detention at the Ecuadorean Embassy in London where he sought refuge in 2012.

See Full Article

Sweden has seen the report, to be published Friday, and the Geneva-based UN panel concluded that it "was an arbitrary detention.

"It is a different assessment than what the Swedish authorities have made," Roslund said, declining further comment.

The Working Group on Arbitrary Detention hasn't revealed its decision, saying it would remain confidential until Friday, said Christophe Peschoux of the UN human rights office in Geneva.

A finding in Assange's favour wouldn't be binding on authorities in Sweden and Britain, which seek to arrest and question Assange, but it would represent a public relations victory for the 44-year-old WikiLeaks chief.

It could increase pressure on Swedish prosecutors to drop their bid to question Assange about allegations of sexual misconduct and on British officials to alter plans to arrest Assange for jumping bail.

Swedish officials wouldn't comment on their plans Thursday, and British police said plans to arrest Assange if he leaves the Ecuadorean Embassy in London remain unchanged.

He has been in the embassy for more than three years.

The report will be officially released Friday and Assange's supporters have scheduled a news conference in London for that day to discuss his plans. He has said via Twitter that he expects to have his confiscated passport returned in light of the UN report and to be free to travel.

"Should I prevail and the state parties be found to have acted unlawfully, I expect the immediate return of my passport and the termination of further attempts to arrest me," Assange said on Twitter before the finding was made public in Sweden.

Assange is expected at the news conference, either in person or -- more likely -- in a video link from his safe haven at the embassy.

One of his lawyers told the Associated Press Thursday he may travel to Ecuador, which has given him political asylum, if he recovers his passport and his liberty.

Jan M. Olsen reported from Copenhagen, Denmark. Jamey Keaten contributed to this report from Geneva



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • City costs for Vancouver 4-20 marijuana protest more than $245,000

    Canada News CTV News
    VANCOUVER -- This year's 4-20 marijuana day of protest in Vancouver cost the city more than $245,000. The city says estimates 40,000 people were at Sunset Beach Park and the Vancouver Art Gallery during the April 20 protest. Source
  • FBI investigating Kushner's meetings with Russians: report

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the House oversight committee asked the FBI on Thursday to turn over more documents about former FBI Director James Comey's interactions with the White House and Justice Department, including materials dating back nearly four years to the Obama administration. Source
  • Forklift driver tried to save Manchester attack victim

    World News Toronto Sun
    TALES OF HEROISM AND HEARTACHE On Monday, Manchester saw the utter worst of humanity - and some of the best. Seconds after the bomb exploded, forklift driver Paul Reid selflessly raced back into the building and tried to save the attack’s youngest victim: Saffie Rose Roussos, who was eight and had been separated from her mother. Source
  • Donald Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner now a focus of Russia probe

    World News Toronto Sun
    Investigators are focusing on a series of meetings held by Jared Kushner, U.S. President Donald Trump's son-in-law and an influential White House adviser, as part of their probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and related matters, according to people familiar with the investigation. Source
  • N.S. premier accused of broken promises at debate in Halifax

    Canada News CTV News
    HALIFAX -- Tory Leader Jamie Baillie cast himself Thursday night as the only man who can beat Stephen McNeil, while the Liberal premier implored voters to ignore campaign "negativity" and give him a second mandate. Source
  • 'Terrorist' in body armour crashed stolen tractor-trailer into Bunny Ranch, owner says [Photos]

    World News Toronto Sun
    LAS VEGAS — A man wearing body armour and a mask backed a tractor-trailer through the gate of the Moonlite Bunny Ranch and crashed it into the front door of the famed Nevada brothel featured in the CatHouse reality television show, according to authorities and the brothel’s owner. Source
  • Spry woman jumps on hood of SUV to thwart carjacking

    World News Toronto Sun
    What would you do if someone tried to steal your vehicle right in front of you? For one Wisconsin resident, the answer is simple: Go all Martin Riggs and jump on its hood. Melissa Smith was the victim of an attempted carjacking while filling up at a gas station in downtown Milwaukee Tuesday afternoon. Source
  • Accused Yahoo hacker appealing detention order [Photos]

    World News Toronto Sun
    Accused proxy hacker Karim Baratov will be seeking his freedom at Ontario’s highest court on June 5. Baratov’s lawyers Ravin Pillay and Amedeo DiCarlo filed notice at the Ontario Court of Appeal to rescind the detention order imposed by Justice Alan Whitten last month. Source
  • After Trump pushes him aside, Montenegro's PM calls it 'harmless'

    World News CTV News
    BRUSSELS -- President Donald Trump's push to get in front of the pack at a NATO summit generated indignation in the Balkans and garnered attention on social media -- but the man he shoved aside took it in stride. Source
  • Trudeau suggests defence review will invest more in troops than weaponry

    Canada News CBC News
    When most people envision a defence policy, they think bullets, bombs and battleships, but Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal government appears set to deliver something decidedly different early next month. Much of the advance publicity for the government's long-anticipated statement of military priorities is being run through the soft-focus filter of social issues and supporting troops. Source