UN panel: Too often only half of aid money get to the needy

Too often only half of the money from donors is getting to the millions of people devastated by conflicts and natural disasters who desperately need humanitarian aid, the co-chair of a U.N.

See Full Article

-appointed panel said Wednesday.

Kristalina Georgieva, the European Commission's vice-president for budget and human resources, said the nine-member panel trying to find new financing to help the rapidly growing number of people needing humanitarian aid is urging donors and aid organizations to work more closely to drive down costs.

"Humanitarian money is like gold" because it saves lives, she told a briefing on the panel's report. "But our goals very often are very low karat -- a 9 karat gold -- because we take a dollar or a pound or a yen or a ruble, and by the time it gets to the recipient it shrinks to only half of what it is worth."

Georgieva said this is because of transaction costs, administration and "because of us creating bureaucracy."

The report said the world is spending around $25 billion to help 125 million people today -- more than 12 times the $2 billion spent in 2000 -- but there is still a $15 billion annual funding gap. It warned that if the current trend continues, the cost of humanitarian assistance will rise to $50 billion by 2030.

The report focuses on three solutions: mobilizing more funds, shrinking the need for aid by preventing and resolving conflicts, and improving the efficiency of assistance.

"There are plenty of examples where 90, even 95 cents on the dollar get into the hands of people in need," Georgieva told several journalists after the briefing, and these should be emulated as best practices.

Georgieva also asked "how come today only 0.2 per cent of funding we provide goes direct to local organizations when we know that ... they are the first line of defence when something tragic happens?"

The panel called for an end to competition between aid organizations and between humanitarian and development agencies, which Georgieva called "competitive inefficiency."

"We want to see it moving to be collaborative efficiency," she said.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Basil Borutski found guilty in 2015 killings

    Canada News CTV News
    OTTAWA -- Basil Borutski, the man accused of killing three women in an hour-long, revenge-fuelled rampage across the Ottawa Valley two years ago, has been found guilty on two counts of first-degree murder and one of second-degree murder. Source
  • Man ordered to pay $41K in fines for starting wildfires in northern Saskatchewan

    Canada News CTV News
    LA RONGE, Sask. -- A man who admitted he started several wildfires in northern Saskatchewan by flicking lit wooden matches into the forest has been fined tens of thousands of dollars. Donald Halkett Jr. Source
  • Calgary man found guilty in death of former girlfriend stabbed 75 times

    Canada News CTV News
    A 33-year-old Calgary man has been found guilty of second-degree murder in the stabbing death of his former common-law partner. After approximately eight hours of deliberation, the jury reached its verdict in the trial of Kevin Rubletz on Wednesday night. Source
  • Basil Borutski guilty of murdering 3 women in shocking killing spree

    Canada News CBC News
    Basil Borutski has been found guilty of murdering three of his former partners in a shocking one-day killing spree that's been called one of the worst cases of domestic violence in Canadian history. A jury of six men and five women returned the guilty verdicts on two counts of first-degree and one count of second-degree murder at 2:30 p.m. Source
  • Canadian submariner 'really feels for' Argentines lost on sub in South Atlantic

    Canada News CTV News
    HALIFAX -- A man injured in a Canadian submarine accident says he feels for the families of 44 Argentine submarine crew members lost in the South Atlantic for nine days. Douglas Renken was one of nine sailors treated for smoke inhalation following the deadly fire onboard HMCS Chicoutimi in 2004. Source
  • Tiger escapes from circus, roams streets of Paris

    World News CTV News
    PARIS -- Police in Paris say a tiger escaped from a circus in the city and roamed the streets of the French capital for "some time" before being killed. Police said that the big cat was "neutralized" by a staff member from the circus near a bridge over the River Seine, about two kilometres (1.24 miles) from the Eiffel Tower. Source
  • Mosque attack a reminder of threat to Canadian Sinai force

    Canada News CBC News
    The Egyptian chapter of ISIS that claimed Friday's horrific attack in Bir al-Abd, Sinai, has also become a growing threat to a multinational force of peacekeepers that includes a contingent of 68 Canadian soldiers. The Multinational Force and Observer mission, or MFO, has been in the Sinai since 1981 to guarantee the peace treaty between Egypt and Israel. Source
  • Why Wilfrid Laurier University's president apologized to Lindsay Shepherd

    Canada News CBC News
    In an interview with CBC, Wilfred Laurier University's president and vice-chancellor Deborah MacLatchy explained why she apologized to Lindsay Shepherd, a teaching assistant who was recently sanctioned by the university. Listen to the full interview with Deborah MacLatchy Source
  • Oxford Dictionaries sends video message to B.C. boy who invented 'levidrome'

    Canada News CTV News
    VICTORIA -- An editor at Oxford Dictionaries in the United Kingdom has sent an encouraging response to a six-year-old Victoria boy who created a buzz by inventing a word. Levi Budd came up with levidrome to define a word that forms a different word when spelled backwards, such as rats from star and loop from pool. Source
  • Ivanka Trump: Malia Obama should be 'off limits' to media

    World News CTV News
    NEW YORK -- Ivanka Trump is condemning recent tabloid coverage of President Barack Obama's eldest daughter Malia, saying the college student deserves privacy and ought to be "OFF limits." The president's daughter tweets: "Malia Obama should be allowed the same privacy as her school aged peers. Source