In a Canadian first, Calgary-born Ted Cruz wins a U.S. presidential contest

WASHINGTON - A conservative firebrand survived weeks of flame-throwing over his Calgary birth to make history Monday as a Canadian-born winner of a major United States presidential contest.

See Full Article

A dual citizen until recently, Alberta-born Ted Cruz won the first-in-the-country nomination contest, taking the Iowa Republican caucuses despite being bombarded with questions about his eligibility by Donald Trump.

The billionaire's birtherist broadsides failed against Barack Obama four years ago and they didn't work in Iowa, either: thanks to a superior organizational-and-turnout effort, Cruz exceeded pollsters' expectations and won by about four percentage points.

It was a humbling evening for Trump. He almost fell into third place, behind a jubilant Sen. Marco Rubio. As for the normally bombastic Trump, he was gracious in defeat: "I'm just honoured. I'm really honoured, and I want to congratulate Ted... Iowa, we love you... I think I might come back here and buy a farm."

Trump expressed optimism that he'll go on to win the nomination. He made sure to mention his bigger leads in the polls in New Hampshire - which votes next week, and which has a very different political makeup from Iowa with far fewer religious voters.

Cruz staked his campaign on the midwestern state's social conservatives. He launched his bid last year at an evangelical Christian university, and religious voters appeared to reward him Monday.

Styling himself as the staunchest right-winger among the Republican frontrunners, the first-term Texas lawmaker went out of his way to draw attention to his prickly relationship with his Senate colleagues - none of whom have endorsed him.

He has parried Trump's attacks over his unpopularity with colleagues by branding himself as an outsider, in tune with the insurrectionist spirit rippling through the party.

That anti-establishment mood was potent enough Monday to relegate the fat-walleted campaign of the presumed frontrunner entering the race, Jeb Bush, to an embarrassing sixth-place finish.

On the Democratic side, meanwhile, the establishment favourite was sweating. Hillary Clinton was clinging to a nailbiting lead of less than half a percentage point over the underdog challenging her from the left - Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Among Republicans, Cruz took about 28 per cent. Trump badly under-performed his poll numbers to finish with 24 per cent. And Rubio finished a strong third with 23 per cent, making him an early contender for the support of the more moderate mainstream as the race shifts to New Hampshire next week, then to southern states.

On paper, Iowa results mean little.

The state has a dismal track record of predicting the nominee: in contested years, it's only picked the eventual Republican winner two of the last seven times. Of the more than 1,200 delegates required to win the nomination at this summer's Republican convention, Iowa confers only confers 30, to be split among the frontrunners.

But the results have mattered in other ways: Every big-party nominee of the modern era has won one of the first two contests, and Iowa has divided the field into contenders and no-hopers. Mike Huckabee, a former Iowa winner, immediately suspended his campaign Monday.

For his part, Rubio emerged as a first-tier player, which will cause nervousness among Democrats: he is perhaps the only candidate in his party to consistently beat Clinton in hypothetical head-to-head polling matchups.

The state has a far better track record of picking the Democratic winner.

And Clinton was seeking to cement her frontrunner status within that party. With votes still being counted late Monday, she was on the verge of snapping a family jinx.

In a state that produced heartbreak for her in 2008, that dealt her husband a withering fourth-place defeat in 1992, she clung to a paper-thin lead of less than one-fifth of a percentage point.

But even a narrow victory could slow her dark-horse challenger. To defeat Clinton, Sanders would have to repeat the momentum-building triumph of Barack Obama in 2008 - when he closed a huge gap with her in later-voting southern states.

The latest polls show Clinton with a 40-per-cent lead in South Carolina. Sanders leads in New Hampshire, and had been hoping a two-for-two sweep might reverse the trend in the south.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Canada seeks to get more women into UN peacekeeping operations

    Canada News CBC News
    Canada is looking at ways to help other countries boost the number of female peacekeepers, despite having only a handful of Canadian women in blue helmets and berets. Global Affairs Canada is hosting a session today with representatives from several countries and the United Nations to brainstorm ways to get more female peacekeepers deployed. Source
  • Alberta spent $2.7B in failed bid to cut classroom sizes: auditor

    Canada News CTV News
    EDMONTON -- Alberta's auditor general says the province has spent $2.7 billion over the last 14 years in a failed attempt to reduce classroom sizes. Merwan Saher says in his latest report that the Education Department has not effectively overseen and directed the program. Source
  • Yet again, U.S. debates if teachers should carry guns in school

    World News CTV News
    Utah teacher Kasey Hansen says carrying a concealed weapon in school is "more of a solution" than hiding in a corner and waiting if an armed intruder enters the classroom. But Texas teacher Tara Bordeaux worries that she lacks "the instincts" of a law enforcement officer and can't easily see herself carrying a gun in class. Source
  • Former Nova Scotia teacher who sexually abused students loses appeal

    Canada News CTV News
    HALIFAX -- Nova Scotia's highest court has upheld the convictions of a former teacher who sexually abused two teenage students. Amy Hood of Stellarton, N.S., was found guilty in April 2016 of sexual touching, sexual exploitation and luring minors for a sexual purpose. Source
  • Suspect in gas station break and enter found hiding in the ceiling

    Canada News CTV News
    An Alberta man was arrested early Monday morning after an alleged break and enter at a gas station. The catch? He was found hiding in the ceiling. RCMP were originally called to a gas station in the town of Penhold, an hour south of Edmonton, around 2 a.m. Source
  • B.C. father facing murder charges in deaths of daughters appears in court

    Canada News CTV News
    VICTORIA - A man facing second-degree murder charges in the deaths of his two daughters made a brief court appearance by video on Thursday in Victoria. Andrew Berry did not speak during the appearance. Source
  • Saskatchewan MP Weir unaware of any harassment allegations as deadline for complaints passes

    Canada News CBC News
    Federal NDP MP Erin Weir says he remains in the dark about any allegations of harassment against him, despite the party's deadline for complaints having come and gone. The Saskatchewan MP was temporarily suspended from his duties earlier this month after caucus colleague Christine Moore alleged that Weir had engaged in harassing behaviour towards women, including party staff members. Source
  • Stymied by regulators, Airbnb looks to luxury vacations, hotels for growth

    World News CBC News
    Airbnb is rolling out new services aimed at attracting travellers looking for luxury accommodations and traditional hotels, the latest move to contend with sputtering growth in its original home-renting business. The company on Thursday will unveil a new product that bundles Airbnb's poshest properties with high-end travel services, as well as a separate category of homes guaranteed to be clean and comfortable. Source
  • Ticketed for paying wrong parking meter, Quebec woman wins court fight to overturn fine

    Canada News CBC News
    A Saint-Jérôme, Que., woman who says she made an error in good faith when paying for her parking in the wrong meter has successfully contested her ticket — a ruling at least one legal expert believes could set an important new precedent. Source
  • Union says strong 'no confidence' vote in Toronto police chief

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO -- An overwhelming majority of Toronto police union members who voted over the past week in a symbolic poll expressed a lack of confidence in the city's chief of police -- although fewer than half took part in the online survey. Source