In a Canadian first, Calgary-born Ted Cruz wins a U.S. presidential contest

WASHINGTON - A conservative firebrand survived weeks of flame-throwing over his Calgary birth to make history Monday as a Canadian-born winner of a major United States presidential contest.

See Full Article

A dual citizen until recently, Alberta-born Ted Cruz won the first-in-the-country nomination contest, taking the Iowa Republican caucuses despite being bombarded with questions about his eligibility by Donald Trump.

The billionaire's birtherist broadsides failed against Barack Obama four years ago and they didn't work in Iowa, either: thanks to a superior organizational-and-turnout effort, Cruz exceeded pollsters' expectations and won by about four percentage points.

It was a humbling evening for Trump. He almost fell into third place, behind a jubilant Sen. Marco Rubio. As for the normally bombastic Trump, he was gracious in defeat: "I'm just honoured. I'm really honoured, and I want to congratulate Ted... Iowa, we love you... I think I might come back here and buy a farm."

Trump expressed optimism that he'll go on to win the nomination. He made sure to mention his bigger leads in the polls in New Hampshire - which votes next week, and which has a very different political makeup from Iowa with far fewer religious voters.

Cruz staked his campaign on the midwestern state's social conservatives. He launched his bid last year at an evangelical Christian university, and religious voters appeared to reward him Monday.

Styling himself as the staunchest right-winger among the Republican frontrunners, the first-term Texas lawmaker went out of his way to draw attention to his prickly relationship with his Senate colleagues - none of whom have endorsed him.

He has parried Trump's attacks over his unpopularity with colleagues by branding himself as an outsider, in tune with the insurrectionist spirit rippling through the party.

That anti-establishment mood was potent enough Monday to relegate the fat-walleted campaign of the presumed frontrunner entering the race, Jeb Bush, to an embarrassing sixth-place finish.

On the Democratic side, meanwhile, the establishment favourite was sweating. Hillary Clinton was clinging to a nailbiting lead of less than half a percentage point over the underdog challenging her from the left - Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Among Republicans, Cruz took about 28 per cent. Trump badly under-performed his poll numbers to finish with 24 per cent. And Rubio finished a strong third with 23 per cent, making him an early contender for the support of the more moderate mainstream as the race shifts to New Hampshire next week, then to southern states.

On paper, Iowa results mean little.

The state has a dismal track record of predicting the nominee: in contested years, it's only picked the eventual Republican winner two of the last seven times. Of the more than 1,200 delegates required to win the nomination at this summer's Republican convention, Iowa confers only confers 30, to be split among the frontrunners.

But the results have mattered in other ways: Every big-party nominee of the modern era has won one of the first two contests, and Iowa has divided the field into contenders and no-hopers. Mike Huckabee, a former Iowa winner, immediately suspended his campaign Monday.

For his part, Rubio emerged as a first-tier player, which will cause nervousness among Democrats: he is perhaps the only candidate in his party to consistently beat Clinton in hypothetical head-to-head polling matchups.

The state has a far better track record of picking the Democratic winner.

And Clinton was seeking to cement her frontrunner status within that party. With votes still being counted late Monday, she was on the verge of snapping a family jinx.

In a state that produced heartbreak for her in 2008, that dealt her husband a withering fourth-place defeat in 1992, she clung to a paper-thin lead of less than one-fifth of a percentage point.

But even a narrow victory could slow her dark-horse challenger. To defeat Clinton, Sanders would have to repeat the momentum-building triumph of Barack Obama in 2008 - when he closed a huge gap with her in later-voting southern states.

The latest polls show Clinton with a 40-per-cent lead in South Carolina. Sanders leads in New Hampshire, and had been hoping a two-for-two sweep might reverse the trend in the south.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Canada 150: Five national parks to visit with the free discovery pass

    Canada News CTV News
    With Parks Canada offering a free Discovery Pass for the country's 150th anniversary, CTVNews.ca has rounded up the best bucket-list destinations to visit. Banff National Park – Alberta Canada's first national park is also one of its most spectacular, with a glacier lake, breathtaking views of the Rocky Mountains and some of the best ski slopes in the country. Source
  • Manchester bomber Salman Abedi had ‘face of hate’ [Photos] [Video]

    World News Toronto Sun
    MANCHESTER, England — An apparent suicide bomber attacked an Ariana Grande concert as it ended Monday night, killing 22 people among a panicked crowd of young concertgoers, some still wearing the star’s trademark kitten ears and holding pink balloons as they fled. Source
  • 3 more arrested in Manchester bombing

    World News CBC News
    Police in Manchester say they have arrested three more men in connection with the suicide bombing at a pop concert that killed 22 people. They said Wednesday the arrests had been made in the south of the U.K. Source
  • U.S. officials seize $500M worth of poppies used for opium

    World News CTV News
    CLAREMONT, N.C. - Authorities say nearly half a hectare of poppy plants used in producing opium has been seized in North Carolina. Local news groups report the Catawba County Sheriff's Office seized the field Tuesday. Source
  • Philippines president declares martial law as Muslim extremists lay siege to city

    World News CBC News
    Muslim extremists abducted a Catholic priest and more than a dozen churchgoers while laying siege to a southern Philippine city overnight, burning buildings, ambushing soldiers and hoisting flags of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria group, officials said Wednesday. Source
  • Summer temperatures will swing between hot, cold: meteorologist

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO -- Temperatures this summer are expected to feel like "whiplash," and may swing between hot and cool over the course of the season, a top meteorologist says. The Weather Network released its summer forecast Tuesday, and chief meteorologist Chris Scott said it may feel like being on a teeter-totter. Source
  • Strong winds leave thousands without power across B.C.

    Canada News CTV News
    VANCOUVER - BC Hydro was reporting more than 74,000 homes and businesses without electricity late Tuesday due to strong winds throughout the province. The utility says most of the outages, affecting almost 36,000 customers, were in the Lower Mainland and Sunshine Coast with a further 35,000 customers in the dark in the Thompson-Shuswap areas. Source
  • 'Houdini' of death row fights for reprieve in Alabama

    World News CTV News
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. - Tommy Arthur has had his execution postponed seven times since 2001, so many delays that victims' rights advocates derisively call him the "Houdini" of death row. He says he is innocent and is fighting for an eighth reprieve, but he is losing optimism: "They are going to kill me this time. Source
  • Search resumes for 4 missing after India bus plunges into river

    World News CTV News
    NEW DELHI - Rescuers on Wednesday found another three bodies as they resumed searching for people missing after a bus plunged into a river in mountainous northern India, killing at least 20 Hindu pilgrims. Police officer Mahadev Uniyal said that rescuers recovered 19 bodies and one person died in a hospital. Source
  • Duterte declares martial law in south Philippines

    World News CTV News
    MANILA, Philippines - Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte warned Wednesday that he'll be harsh in enforcing martial law in his country's south as he abruptly left Moscow to deal with a crisis at home sparked by a Muslim extremist siege on a city, where militants burned buildings overnight and are feared to have taken hostages. Source