Republican candidates mock Trump in his absence

DES MOINES, Iowa -- Absent Donald Trump, the Republican presidential candidates strained to take advantage of a rare opportunity to step out of the front-runner's shadow in Thursday night's debate -- a staid, policy-heavy contest that offered a glimpse of what the GOP contest might have been without the unpredictable businessman.

See Full Article

Still, the candidates couldn't resist mocking Trump for boycotting the final debate before Iowa kicks off voting in the 2016 campaign on Monday.

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, who is locked in a tight contest with Trump in Iowa, opened the debate with a sarcastic impression of the real estate mogul's frequent insults of his opponents.

"I'm a maniac and everyone on this stage is stupid, fat and ugly," Cruz said. Then he thanked his fellow candidates for showing Iowa voters respect by showing up.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, a frequent target of Trump, said with a wry smile, "I kind of miss Donald Trump; he was a teddy bear to me."

Never one to go quietly, Trump was holding a competing rally elsewhere in Des Moines, an event his campaign said was raising money for military veterans.

"When you're treated badly, you have to stick up for your rights," Trump said in explaining he was skipping the debate because he felt Fox News had dealt with him unfairly. Broadening his point, he said, "We have to stick up for ourselves as people and we have to stick up for our country if we're being mistreated."

Trump's absence put the spotlight on Cruz, who is challenging for the lead in Iowa, as well as on Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, who needs a strong showing in the state to stay competitive.

The two senators engaged in a lengthy debate on immigration, one of the most contentious issues among Republicans. Both have been accused of shifting their stances on legalizing some of those in the United States illegally, a position opposed by many GOP voters.

Cruz accused Rubio of making a "politically advantageous" decision to support a 2013 Senate bill that included a pathway to citizenship, while the Florida senator said his rival was "willing to say or do anything to get votes."

In a rare standout debate moment for Bush, the former Florida governor sharply sided with Cruz in accusing Rubio of having "cut and run" on the Senate immigration bill.

"He cut and ran because it wasn't popular with conservatives," Bush said.

With their White House hopes on the line, the candidates worked hard to cast themselves as best prepared to be commander in chief and take on terror threats emanating both from abroad and within the United States.

Rubio struck an aggressive posture, pledging that as president he would go after terrorists "wherever they are. And if we capture them alive, we're sending them to Guantanamo." Rubio also stood by his previous calls for shutting down mosques in the U.S if there were indications that the Muslim religious centres were being used to radicalize terrorists.

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul -- back on the main debate stage after being downgraded to an undercard event because of low poll numbers earlier this month -- warned against closing down mosques. A proponent of a more isolationist foreign policy, Paul also raised concerns about the U.S. getting involved militarily in Syria, where the Islamic State group has a stronghold.

The candidates largely sidestepped direct confrontations with each other, focusing some of their most pointed attacks on Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton.

"She is not qualified to be president of the United States," New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said. "What we need is someone on that stage who has been tested who has been through it."

Christie is part of a crowded field of more mainstream candidates who have struggled to break through in an election year where Trump, and increasingly Cruz, have tapped into voter anger with the political system. Party leaders have grown increasingly antsy for some of the more traditional candidates to step aside after the first contests to allow one to rise up and challenge for the nomination.

Asked whether the crowded establishment lane was putting Trump in position to be the nominee, Bush said, "We're just starting out. The first vote hasn't been counted. Why don't we let the process work?"

Bush also defended the flurry of critical advertisements his well-funded super PAC has launched against Rubio and other rivals.

"It's called politics," Bush said. "That's the way it is. I'm running hard."

Trump pulled out of the debate this week, citing unfair treatment from host Fox News. He's feuded with the network for months, particularly anchor and debate moderator Megyn Kelly.

It's unclear whether Trump's unusual move will hurt his standing with Iowa voters. But his absence did give his rivals more time to make their case to voters.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • New Mexico bus crash leaves 3 dead, 22 injured

    World News CBC News
    Authorities say a crash involving a passenger bus and three other vehicles on a highway in New Mexico has killed three people and injured 22 others, three of them critically. Three people died in the wreck early Sunday, but it's unclear if they were bus passengers or in a semitruck, pickup truck or car also involved in the collision. Source
  • Eritrean, Ethiopian leaders call new peace example to Africa

    World News CTV News
    ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia -- Official rivals just weeks ago, the leaders of Ethiopia and Eritrea embraced warmly to the roar of a crowd of thousands Sunday at a concert celebrating the end of a long state of war. Source
  • Rescue team frees 1st entangled whale since death of volunteer Joe Howlett

    Canada News CBC News
    Campobello Whale Rescue Team freed a young entangled whale Saturday, its first emergency response on the water since fellow rescuer Joe Howlett's death last year. Members of the organization, which is made up of fishermen, a biologist and other volunteers, rescued a baby humpback whale just off the coast of Brier Island, N.S. Source
  • Hamilton police search for man following possible drowning in Lake Ontario

    Canada News CTV News
    Hamilton police are investigating a possible drowning after a man went swimming and didn't resurface from the waters of Lake Ontario. Police say the man's friends called emergency services at about 6 a.m. on Sunday. Source
  • Crews battling rash of forest fires in northern Ontario, B.C.

    Canada News CTV News
    An intense heat wave, windy conditions and a number of lightning-filled thunderstorms have led to the outbreak of forest fires in northern Ontario and parts of British Columbia, with officials warning that there could be more to come. Source
  • Indian Village at Calgary Stampede will change name to Elbow River Camp

    Canada News CTV News
    CALGARY - The Calgary Stampede says its annual display of Indigenous culture that goes back more than 100 years will no longer be called "Indian Village." On Sunday, the final day of this year's stampede, officials announced the village of more than two dozen teepees will be renamed Elbow River Camp. Source
  • Pussy Riot claims on-field protest at World Cup final

    World News CTV News
    MOSCOW -- Russian protest group and Pussy Riot has claimed responsibility for four people who ran onto the field and disrupted the World Cup final. The punk band says in a statement posted on their Twitter feed Sunday that the disruption was a protest. Source
  • Russian punk band Pussy Riot claims on-field protest at World Cup final

    World News CBC News
    Russian protest group Pussy Riot has claimed responsibility for four people who ran onto the field and disrupted the World Cup final in Moscow. The punk band says in a statement posted on their Twitter feed Sunday that the disruption was a protest. Source
  • France defeats Croatia in World Cup final

    World News CBC News
    With Vladimir Putin watching from the stands, France won its second World Cup title in a match that was interrupted by an on-field protest during the second half that Russian punk band Pussy Riot later took credit for. Source
  • U.S. trade, immigration and biofuel policies hit farmers hard

    World News CTV News
    DES MOINES, Iowa -- Even before the spectre of a trade war with China and other countries threatened to cost them billions of dollars, American farmers were feeling the squeeze from fluctuating crop prices and other factors that have halved their overall income in recent years. Source