'Go home and hug your families,' Oregon militia leader Ammon Bundy says

BURNS, Ore. -- Three members of an armed group occupying an Oregon wildlife refuge surrendered to authorities, officials said, hours after their jailed leader urged the remaining occupiers to go home.

See Full Article

The three arrests Wednesday came a day after the arrests of leader Ammon Bundy and seven others and the death of another occupier in a confrontation with law enforcement.

The group, which has included people from as far away as Arizona and Michigan, seized the headquarters of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge on Jan. 2. They want federal lands turned over to local authorities.

The FBI and Oregon State Police said that 45-year-old Duane Leo Ehmer of Irrigon, Oregon, and 34-year-old Dylan Wade Anderson of Provo, Utah, turned themselves in around 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. And 43-year-old Jason S. Patrick of Bonaire, Georgia, did the same a few hours later.

After Bundy made his first court appearance in Portland on Wednesday, his attorney, Mike Arnold, read this statement from his client: "Please stand down. Go home and hug your families. This fight is now in the courts."

It was unclear whether the rest of Bundy's followers still holed up at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge south of Burns were ready to heed his advice. It was believed perhaps a half-dozen remained late Wednesday.

Meanwhile, details began to emerge about the confrontation Tuesday on a remote highway that resulted in the death of Robert Finicum.

Bundy followers gave conflicting accounts of how Finicum died. One said Finicum charged at FBI agents, who then shot him. A member of the Bundy family said Finicum did nothing to provoke the agents.

An Oregon man who says he witnessed the shootout says he heard about a half-dozen shots but didn't see anyone get hit, and that the shooting happened quickly -- over maybe 12 or 15 seconds. Raymond Doherty told Portland TV station KOIN-TV that he was about 100 feet back and couldn't see who specifically was shooting. But, he added, "I saw them shooting at each other."

Authorities refused to release any details about the encounter or even to verify that it was Finicum who was killed.

FBI agent Greg Bretzing defended the FBI-led operation. "I will say that the armed occupiers were given ample opportunities to leave peacefully," he said.

Also on Wednesday, a federal judge in Portland unsealed a criminal complaint that said the armed group had explosives and night-vision goggles and that they were prepared to fight at the refuge or in the nearby town of Burns.

Someone told authorities about the equipment on Jan. 2, the day the group took over Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, according to the document.

Bundy and the seven others are charged with felony counts of "conspiracy to impede officers of the United States from their official duties through the use of force, intimidation, or threats."

The criminal complaint says the refuge's 16 employees have been prevented from reporting to work because of threats of violence.

Federal law officials and Harney County Sheriff Dave Ward held a news conference on Wednesday in which they called on the rest of the occupiers to go home. There is a huge law enforcement presence in the region, and the FBI has now set up checkpoints outside the refuge.

Bundy followers took to social media to offer conflicting accounts of Finicum's final moments.

In a video posted to Facebook, Mark McConnell said he was driving a vehicle carrying Ammon Bundy when he and a truck driven by Finicum were stopped by agents in heavy-duty trucks.

When agents approached the truck driven by Finicum, he drove off with officers in pursuit. McConnell said he did not see what happened next, but he heard from others who were in that vehicle that they encountered a roadblock.

The truck got stuck in a snowbank, and Finicum got out and "charged them. He went after them," McConnell said.

Relatives of Ammon Bundy offered similar accounts, but they said Finicum did nothing to provoke FBI agents.

Briana Bundy, a sister of Ammon Bundy, said he called his wife after his arrest.

She said people in the two vehicles complied with instructions to get out with their hands up.

"LaVoy shouted, 'Don't shoot. We're unarmed,"' Briana Bundy told The Associated Press. "They began to fire on them. Ammon said it happened real fast."

"Ammon said, 'They murdered him in cold blood,"' she added.

McConnell had a different perspective.

"Any time someone takes off with a vehicle away from law enforcement after they've exercised a stop, it's typically considered an act of aggression, and foolish," he said in the Facebook video.

Ammon and Ryan Bundy are the sons of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, who was involved in a high-profile 2014 standoff with the government over grazing rights.

The group they led came to the frozen high desert of eastern Oregon to decry what it calls onerous federal land restrictions and to object to the prison sentences of two local ranchers convicted of setting fires.

In nearby Burns, 80-year-old Bev Schaff said the occupation has "split this town."

"Some people are for it and some against it. But I think everyone is ready for it to be over," Schaff said.

Petty reported from Portland. Associated Press writers Ken Ritter in Las Vegas, Rebecca Boone in Boise, Idaho, and Martha Bellisle and Lisa Baumann in Seattle contributed to this report



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • 'Screaming, howling wind' from cyclone leaves thousands of Aussies without power

    World News CBC News
    Howling winds, heavy rain and huge seas pounded Australia's northeast on Tuesday, damaging homes, wrecking jetties and cutting power to thousands of people as Tropical Cyclone Debbie tore through Queensland state's far north. Wind gusts stronger than 260 km per hour were recorded at tourist resorts along the world-famous Great Barrier Reef as the powerful storm, at Category 4 just one rung below the most dangerous wind speed level, began to make landfall. Source
  • Malaysian authorities still in possession of Kim Jong-nam's body

    World News CBC News
    The body of Kim Jong-nam, who was murdered in Malaysia last month, is still in Kuala Lumpur, health minister Health Minister Subramaniam Sathasivam said on Tuesday, amid reports the remains of the estranged half brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un will soon leave the country. Source
  • Red Bull heir enjoys jet-set life 4 years after hit-and-run

    World News Toronto Sun
    BANGKOK — The Ferrari driver who allegedly slammed into a motorcycle cop, dragged him along the road and then sped away from the mangled body took just hours to find, as investigators followed a drip, drip, drip trail of brake fluid up a street, down an alley, and into the gated estate of one of Thailand’s richest families. Source
  • Trump takes aim at Obama's efforts to curb climate change

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON - Moving forward with a campaign pledge to unravel former President Barack Obama's sweeping plan to curb global warming, U.S. President Donald Trump will sign an executive order Tuesday that will suspend, rescind or flag for review more than a half-dozen measures in an effort to boost domestic energy production in the form of fossil fuels. Source
  • Talk about horsepower; Fugitive horse, mule run loose on California highway

    World News Toronto Sun
    WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — That mustang in the rearview mirror turned out to be a real horse running on a Northern California highway — followed by a mule. Commuters east of San Francisco on Monday were stunned to see a white horse and a brown mule running across Interstate 680. Source
  • Albertans would be consulted before any pot rules set, Notley says

    Canada News CBC News
    Albertans will be consulted by the province before rules around where marijuana can be bought, sold and used roll out pending legalization next July, Premier Rachel Notley said Monday. "We're aware of all the issues, we haven't landed yet on the key decision factors because we need to consult with Albertans and we have to know exactly what the federal legislation looks like before we can figure out what our path looks like after that," she said. Source
  • Coalition isn't protecting Mosul civilians, Amnesty alleges

    World News CTV News
    BAGHDAD - A recent spike in civilian casualties in Mosul suggests the U.S.-led coalition is not taking adequate precautions to prevent civilian deaths as it battles the Islamic State militant group alongside Iraqi ground forces, Amnesty International said Tuesday. Source
  • Woman attempted to impregnate captive Mexican surrogate with syringes

    World News Toronto Sun
    A Florida woman pleaded guilty to forced labour charges after she admitted to smuggling a Mexican woman across the border, holding her captive while attempting to impregnate her with syringes. Esthela Clark, 47, of Jacksonville, told a courtroom that she paid about $3,000 to have a woman smuggled across the border from Mexico to be a pregnancy surrogate. Source
  • French tourists retrace N.S. soldier's path to Vimy Ridge

    Canada News CTV News
    Most French tourists walk the cobble stone streets around Cape Breton’s Fortress of Louisbourg to retrace the footsteps of their ancestors who fought the British over what would become Canada. But one group has crossed the Atlantic to relive the journey of a young Nova Scotia coal miner who gave his life on one of the most famous battlefields of the First World War. Source
  • White U.S. Army veteran charged with act of terrorism in killing of black man

    World News CBC News
    A white racist accused of fatally stabbing a 66-year-old stranger on a Manhattan street because he was black says he'd intended it as "a practice run" in a mission to deter interracial relationships. James Harris Jackson, 28, spoke with a reporter for the Daily News at New York City's Rikers Island jail complex. Source