Three more arrested as leader urges Oregon militia to go home

BURNS, Ore. - Hours after the jailed leader of an armed anti-government group urged remaining militants to abandon the Oregon wildlife refuge they have occupied for more than three weeks, the FBI said they arrested three more suspects at one of the checkpoints they've established near the refuge.

See Full Article

The FBI and Oregon State Police said in a statement that 45-year-old Duane Leo Ehmer of Irrigon, Oregon, and 34-year-old Dylan Wade Anderson of Provo, Utah, turned themselves in around 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. And 43-year-old Jason S. Patrick of Bonaire, Georgia, did the same a few hours later.

The men were described as being in contact with the FBI and officials said the men surrendered to agents on a road near the refuge.

After militant leader Ammon Bundy made his first court appearance in Portland on Wednesday, his attorney, Mike Arnold, read this statement from his client: "Please stand down. Go home and hug your families. This fight is now in the courts."

It was unclear whether the rest of the remnant of Bundy's followers still holed up at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge south of Burns was ready to heed his advice. While some left it was believed perhaps a half-dozen remained late Wednesday, apparently sitting around a campfire.

Meanwhile, details began to emerge about the confrontation Tuesday on a remote highway that resulted in the arrest of Bundy and other leading figures in the group of occupiers, and in the death of militant Robert Finicum.

Bundy followers gave conflicting accounts of how Finicum died. One said Finicum charged at FBI agents, who then shot him. A member of the Bundy family said Finicum did nothing to provoke the agents.

An Oregon man who says he witnessed the shootout says he heard about a half-dozen shots but didn't see anyone get hit, and that the shooting happened quickly - over maybe 12 or 15 seconds. Raymond Doherty told KOIN-TV (http://is.gd/AgNSdm) that he was about 100 feet back and couldn't see who specifically was shooting. But, he added, "I saw them shooting at each other."

Authorities refused to release any details about the encounter or even to verify that it was Finicum who was killed.

Also on Wednesday, a federal judge in Portland unsealed a criminal complaint that said the armed group had explosives and night-vision goggles and that they were prepared to fight at the refuge or in the nearby town of Burns.

Someone told authorities about the equipment on Jan. 2, when the group took over Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, according to the document.

Bundy and the seven others are charged with felony counts of "conspiracy to impede officers of the United States from their official duties through the use of force, intimidation, or threats."

The criminal complaint stresses that point. It states that the 16 employees at the wildlife refuge "have been prevented from reporting to work because of threats of violence posed by the defendants and others occupying the property."

Federal law officials and Harney County Sheriff Dave Ward held a news conference on Wednesday in which they called on the rest of the occupiers to go home. There is a huge law enforcement presence in the region, and the FBI has now set up checkpoints outside the refuge.

FBI agent Greg Bretzing said people could leave through checkpoints "where they will be identified." FBI officials said Wednesday night, in addition to the three men arrested, five people left the refuge through the checkpoints and were released without arrest.

Bretzing also defended the FBI-led operation that resulted in the arrest of Bundy and other leaders, and in the death of Finicum. "I will say that the armed occupiers were given ample opportunities to leave peacefully," he said.

Ward said multiple law-enforcement agencies put together "the best tactical plan they could."

Bundy followers took to social media to offer conflicting accounts of Finicum's final moments.

In a video posted to Facebook, Mike McConnell said he was driving a vehicle carrying Ammon Bundy and another occupier, Brian Cavalier. He said Finicum was driving a truck and with him were Ryan Bundy - Ammon's brother - as well as three others.

He said the convoy was driving through a forest when they were stopped by agents in heavy-duty trucks. He said agents first pulled him out of the vehicle, followed by Ammon Bundy and Cavalier.

When agents approached the truck driven by Filicum, he drove off with officers in pursuit. McConnell said he did not see what happened next, but he heard from others who were in that vehicle that they encountered a roadblock.

The truck got stuck in a snowbank, and Finicum got out and "charged them. He went after them," McConnell said.

Relatives of Ammon Bundy offered similar accounts, but they said Finicum did nothing to provoke FBI agents.

Briana Bundy, a sister of Ammon Bundy, said he called his wife after his arrest. He said the group was stopped by state and federal officers.

She said people in the two vehicles complied with instructions to get out with their hands up.

"LaVoy shouted, 'Don't shoot. We're unarmed,' "Briana Bundy said in an interview with The Associated Press. "They began to fire on them. Ammon said it happened real fast."

"Ammon said, 'They murdered him in cold blood."

McConnell had a different perspective.

"Any time someone takes off with a vehicle away from law enforcement after they've exercised a stop, it's typically considered an act of aggression, and foolish," he said in the Facebook video.

Ammon and Ryan Bundy are the sons of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, who was involved in a high-profile 2014 standoff with the government over grazing rights.

The group they led came to the frozen high desert of eastern Oregon to decry what it calls onerous federal land restrictions and to object to the prison sentences of two local ranchers convicted of setting fires.

In the small community of Burns, near the refuge, 80-year-old Bev Schaff said the occupation has "split this town."

"Some people are for it and some against it. But I think everyone is ready for it to be over," Schaff said.

-----

Associated Press writers Ken Ritter in Las Vegas, Rebecca Boone in Boise, Idaho, and Martha Bellisle and Lisa Baumann in Seattle contributed to this report.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Efforts to stop anonymous sources clash with U.S. 1st Amendment

    World News CTV News
    President Donald Trump railed against the news media Friday, saying reporters shouldn't be allowed to use anonymous sources. He said he's been a target of unrelenting criticism by unnamed people, and he predicted that negative stories would "dry up like you've never seen before" if anonymous sources were jettisoned. Source
  • Thousands of northern B.C. patients' X-rays, CT scans and ultrasounds may have been misread

    Canada News CBC News
    Thousands of patients in northwestern B.C. are being told their X-ray, CT scan and ultrasound results may have been improperly analysed. The images were taken at Terrace's Mills Memorial Hospital between October, 2016 and January, 2017. Source
  • Quebec broadens inquiry into Montreal police force

    Canada News CTV News
    MONTREAL -- The Quebec government is broadening its investigation into allegations of corruption and wrongdoing within the Montreal police force. Public Security Minister Martin Coiteux says municipal forces from Quebec City, Longueuil and Gatineau will help provincial police because the number of allegations has risen in recent days. Source
  • U.S. to stop using 'ISIL' in favour of 'ISIS'

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The change of U.S. administrations has produced a change of terminology in the war against the Islamic State group. Out goes the name preferred by the Obama administration: the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL. Source
  • Authorities say fire was intentionally set at Florida mosque

    World News CTV News
    TAMPA, Fla. -- An intentionally set fire damaged a prayer hall at a Tampa-area mosque early Friday, investigators said. The arson occurred at the Islamic Society of New Tampa, Hillsborough County Fire Rescue said in a news release. Source
  • Alexandru Radita's parents guilty of first-degree murder in 15-year-old son's death

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    Rodica and Emil Radita intentionally killed their teenage son by withholding critical life-saving medical attention, a judge ruled Friday. Justice Karen Horner said both parents were guilty of first-degree murder in the death of 15-year-old Alexandru. Source
  • Winter Stations bring art and wonder to Toronto's Beach waterfront

    Canada News CBC News
    A design contest open to artists, designers, architects and landscape architects has transformed the winter waterfront of Toronto's Beach area. Here's a look at the winning entries, all constructed around lifeguard stands, seen on a morning when dense fog rolled in from Lake Ontario. Source
  • Charlie Angus registers with Elections Canada as NDP leadership candidate

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    Local MP Charlie Angus has officially registered as a candidate in the race for the NDP leader, making him the second person to officially do so after fellow MP Peter Julian. Elections Canada updated their list of registered candidates in the NDP leadership this week, to show that Angus submitted his paperwork on Feb. Source
  • 'Like Monty Python': N.B. drug conviction set aside after English woman tried in French

    Canada News CTV News
    FREDERICTON -- A New Brunswick court has set aside a woman's drug trafficking conviction after her trial was mistakenly conducted in French for no apparent reason. "I hate to say it, but it sounds like a Monty Python movie," said John McEvoy, a law professor at the University of New Brunswick. Source
  • Accused beauty queen killer not on cops’ ‘radar’

    World News Toronto Sun
    Ryan Alexander Duke looked shocked and haggard. Charged with first-degree murder in the cold-case slaying of beauty queen-turned-teacher Tara Grinstead, Duke’s arrest ended a long odyssey for her friends, family - and detectives. In court, he looked exhausted and disheveled. Source