1 killed during traffic stop as FBI arrest leaders of Oregon militia

The FBI and Oregon State Police on Tuesday arrested the leaders of an armed group that has occupied a national wildlife refuge for the past three weeks, conducting a traffic stop that prompted gunfire - and one death - along a highway through the frozen high country.

See Full Article

Militant leader Ammon Bundy and his followers were reportedly heading to a community meeting at the senior centre in John Day, a Grant County town about 112 kilometres north of Burns, to address local residents to discuss their views on federal management of public lands.

The Oregonian newspaper reported several hundred people had gathered at the John Day Senior Center on Tuesday evening and were told the "guest speakers" would not be appearing.

In a statement, the FBI and Oregon State Police said agents had made eight arrests: Bundy, 40; his brother Ryan Bundy, 43; Brian Cavalier, 44; Shawna Cox, 59; and Ryan Payne, 32, during a traffic stop on U.S. Highway 395 Tuesday afternoon. Authorities said two others - Joseph Donald O'Shaughnessy, 45, and Peter Santilli, 50 - were arrested separately in Burns, while FBI agents in Arizona arrested another, Jon Eric Ritzheimer, 32.

Each will face a federal felony charge of conspiracy to impede officers of the United States from discharging their official duties through the use of force, intimidation or threats, authorities said. No indictments or federal charging documents had been made public.

Oregon State Police confirmed that its troopers were involved in the traffic-stop shooting, though neither agency released details about what started it. One of those arrested, described only as a man, suffered non-life-threatening wounds and was treated at a hospital, the agencies said. Another man "who was a subject of a federal probable cause arrest" was killed, they said. The agencies said they would not release further information about the death pending identification by the medical examiner.

Ammon Bundy's group, which has included people from as far away as Arizona and Michigan, seized the headquarters of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge on Jan. 2 as part of a long-running dispute over public lands in the West. Law enforcement officers converged on the wildlife refuge after the arrests and were expected to remain at the site throughout the night; it was unclear how many people, if any, remained in the buildings.

The confrontation came amid increasing calls for law enforcement to take action against Bundy for the illegal occupation of the wildlife refuge. They previously had taken a hands-off approach, reflecting lessons learned during bloody standoffs at Waco, Texas, and Ruby Ridge, Idaho, during the 1990s.

Many residents of Harney County, where the refuge is located, have been among those demanding that Bundy leave. Many sympathize with his criticism of federal land management policies of public lands but opposed the refuge takeover. They feared violence could erupt.

Ammon Bundy recently had begun travelling into Grant County to try to drum up more sympathy for his cause.

"I am pleased that the FBI has listened to the concerns of the local community and responded to the illegal activity occurring in Harney County by outside extremists," Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley said in a written statement. "The leaders of this group are now in custody and I hope that the remaining individuals occupying the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge will peacefully surrender so this community can begin to heal the deep wounds that this illegal activity has created over the last month."

The Bundys are the sons of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, who was involved in a high-profile 2014 standoff with the government over grazing rights.

The state police said it would investigate the officer-involved shooting, with help from the Deschutes County Major Incident Team and the Harney County District Attorney's Office.

The militants, calling themselves Citizens for constitutional Freedom, came to the frozen high desert of eastern Oregon to decry what it calls onerous federal land restrictions and to object to the prison sentences of two local ranchers convicted of setting fires.

Specifically, the group wanted federal lands turned over to local authorities. The U.S. government controls about half of all land in the West.

-----

Associated Press reporters Lisa Baumann in Seattle; Keith Ridler in Boise, Idaho; and Terrence Petty in Portland, Oregon, contributed to this report.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Plan for joint Olympic team with North Korea gets icy reception in South

    World News CBC News
    While Seoul forges ahead with plans to use the upcoming Winter Olympics to showcase inter-Korean unity, some South Korean athletes are "furious" at proposals to form joint teams with North Koreans, highlighting a broader lack of enthusiasm for some of the government's peacemaking plans. Source
  • 4 officers hurt in shooting in South Carolina

    World News CTV News
    YORK, S.C. - Four officers, including three deputies, were shot and wounded while responding to a domestic call in South Carolina. State Law Enforcement Division spokesman Thom Berry said by telephone early Tuesday that York County sheriff's deputies answered the call near York late Monday. Source
  • Glowing red lava causes more to flee from Philippine volcano

    World News CTV News
    MANILA, Philippines -- Glowing-red lava spurted in a fountain and flowed down the Philippines' most active volcano on Tuesday in a stunning display of its fury that has sent more than 34,000 villagers fleeing to safety and prompted police to set up checkpoints to stop tourists from getting too close. Source
  • Sixth straight day of Lac-Megantic jury deliberations begins

    Canada News CTV News
    SHERBROOKE, Que. - The jury will deliberate for a sixth straight day today at the trial of three men charged with criminal negligence causing death in the Lac-Megantic railway disaster. The 12 jurors were sequestered last Thursday and emerged for the first time Monday as they asked the judge for a dictionary and clarification on various judicial matters such as the concept of “reasonable doubt. Source
  • 'My nightmare is over,' says N.S. woman who faced deportation to childhood country

    Canada News CBC News
    Her suitcase was packed, but it turns out Debra Spencer won't be going anywhere after all. And she couldn't be happier. Spencer, 33, came to Canada in 1993 when she was eight years old, adopted by a Nova Scotian family from the Caribbean island of St. Source
  • Hundreds of teens in Denmark suspected of sending child porn

    World News CBC News
    Danish police say more than 1,000 people, mostly teenagers, face preliminary charges of distributing child pornography after sharing videos and photos on social media. Police say the material — featuring two 15-year-olds having sex — could constitute distribution of child pornography even though 15 is the age of consent in Denmark. Source
  • North Korea mocks Trump's 'nuclear button' tweet

    World News CTV News
    Hwang Pyong So, left, stands near North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, second from right, and Pak Pong Ju, right, during the opening ceremony of the Ryomyong residential area, a collection of more than a dozen apartment buildings in Pyongyang, North Korea on April 13, 2017. Source
  • Trump's nuclear button tweet was the 'spasm of a lunatic': North Korea

    World News CTV News
    TOKYO -- North Korea's state-run media say U.S. President Donald Trump's tweet about having a bigger nuclear button than leader Kim Jong Un's is the "spasm of a lunatic." Rodong Sinmun, the ruling party newspaper, lashed out at Trump in a commentary on Tuesday that took issue with the U.S. Source
  • Slow-moving landslide has Washington town on high alert

    World News CTV News
    UNION GAP, Wash. - A slow-moving landslide in a fertile farming region in Washington state has forced evacuations as officials prepare for what they say is inevitable - the collapse of a ridge that sits above a few dozen homes and a key highway. Source
  • U.S. panel set to interview Bannon after his fall from power

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON - The House Intelligence Committee is poised to question Steve Bannon, the onetime confidant to U.S. President Donald Trump, following his spectacular fall from power after accusing the president's son and others of "treasonous" behaviour for taking a meeting with Russians during the 2016 campaign. Source