Grand jury indicts producers of Planned Parenthood videos

AUSTIN, Texas -- A grand jury has indicted two anti-abortion activists who made undercover videos alleging Planned Parenthood illegally sold fetal tissue to researchers for a profit, and said the abortion provider committed no wrong.

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The grand jury in Houston, which investigated Planned Parenthood after the Center for Medical Progress released its undercover footage last year, indicted the centre's founder and another activist on Monday -- the first criminal charges against anyone in the anti-abortion group since the videos surfaced last year.

The videos provoked outrage among Republican leaders across the U.S. and prompted investigations by Republican-led committees in Congress and by Republican-led state governments. Planned Parenthood officials have denied any wrongdoing and say the videos are misleading.

Grand juries meet behind closed doors to consider evidence about whether someone should be charged with a crime. Unlike trial juries, grand juries don't decide if someone is guilty of criminal charges that have been brought against them.

Centre for Medical Progress CEO David Daleiden and activist Sandra Merritt each face a felony charge of tampering with a governmental record, which carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison. Daleiden also faces a misdemeanour count related to purchasing human organs.

The centre's footage from the Planned Parenthood clinic in Houston showed people pretending to be from a company called BioMax that procures fetal tissue for research touring the facility. Planned Parenthood has said that the fake company sent an agreement offering to pay the "astronomical amount" of $1,600 for organs from a fetus. The clinic said it never entered into the agreement and ceased contact with BioMax because it was "disturbed" by the overtures.

In a statement announcing the indictment, Harris County District Attorney Devon Anderson did not provide details on the charges, including which records were allegedly tampered with. Her office said it could not disclose more information, and it was unclear when the indictments would be made public.

"We were called upon to investigate allegations of criminal conduct by Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast," Anderson, an elected Republican, said in her statement. "As I stated at the outset of this investigation, we must go where the evidence leads us."

Daleiden issued a statement saying his group "uses the same undercover techniques" as investigative journalists and follows all applicable laws.

"We respect the processes of the Harris County District Attorney, and note that buying fetal tissue requires a seller as well," he said.

Planned Parenthood has said a few clinics in two states used to accept legally allowed reimbursement for the costs of providing tissue donated by some of its abortion clients. In October, Planned Parenthood announced that it would no longer accept reimbursement and would cover the costs itself.

The group called Monday's indictments the latest in a string of victories since the videos were released, saying 11 state investigations have cleared the nation's largest abortion provider of claims that it profited from fetal tissue donation.

"This is absolutely great news because it is a demonstration of what Planned Parenthood has said from the very beginning: We follow every law and regulation and these anti-abortion activists broke multiple laws to try and spread lies," said spokeswoman Rochelle Tafolla of Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast.

The Texas video was the fifth released by the Center for Medical Progress.

Despite the centre's lofty name, public filings suggest only a small number of people are affiliated with the non-profit, none of whom are scientists or physicians engaged in advancing medical treatments. The people named as its top officers are longtime anti-abortion activists with a history of generating headlines.

Earlier this month, Planned Parenthood sued the centre in a California federal court, alleging extensive criminal misconduct. The lawsuit says the centre's videos were the result of numerous illegalities, including making recordings without consent, registering false identities with state agencies and violating nondisclosure agreements.

After the lawsuit was filed, Daleiden told The Associated Press he looked forward to confronting Planned Parenthood in court.

Associated Press writers Juan A. Lozano in Houston, Will Weissert in Austin and David Crary in New York contributed to this report



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