Egypt's president praises 2011 uprising, urges patience

CAIRO -- Egypt's president paid tribute on Sunday to the country's 2011 uprising that toppled longtime ruler Hosni Mubarak, saying that protesters killed during the 18-day revolt had sought to revive "noble principles" and found a "new Egypt.

See Full Article


President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi's praise of the uprising, delivered via a televised speech on the eve of its fifth anniversary, followed a recent spate of arrests and a heightened security presence in the capital Cairo that reflected his government's resolve that the occasion will not be marked by popular demonstrations-- or militant attacks.

They also came just one day after el-Sissi, a soldier-turned-politician who won office in 2014 following a landslide election victory, praised the country's police and vowed a firm response to any threat to the country's stability. His nod to the police ran against growing complaints by rights activists that the force has returned to Mubarak-era practices like torture, random arrests and, more recently, forced disappearances. Police brutality was among the complaints that drove Egyptians to take part in the 2011 uprising.

El-Sissi said the 2011 uprising had deviated from its course and was forcibly hijacked for "personal gains and narrow interests." That was a thinly veiled reference to the Muslim Brotherhood, which has been banned and declared a terror group after el-Sissi, as military chief, led the ouster in July 2013 of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, who hails from the Brotherhood.

The "June 30 revolution" -- a reference to the day in 2013 when millions of Egyptians demonstrated on the streets against the rule of Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood -- corrected the course of the 2011 uprising, el-Sissi said.

That revolution, he said, took place to "restore the free will of Egyptians and continue to realize their legitimate aspirations and deserved ambitions."

"Egypt today is not the Egypt of yesterday. We are building together a modern, developed and civilian state that upholds the values of democracy and freedom," he said of the 2 1/2 years since the removal of Morsi, Egypt's first freely elected president.

"Democratic experiences don't mature overnight, but rather through a continuing and accumulative process," he said, before emphasizing the need to exercise "responsible freedom" to avoid "destructive chaos." The rhetoric, and insistence that gradual democratization is key to stability, mirrored that of Mubarak during his 29-year authoritarian rule.

El-Sissi has since 2013 presided over what the human rights group Amnesty International describes as an "unprecedented" crackdown on dissenters. Thousands of Brotherhood supporters, as well as scores of liberal, pro-democracy activists have been detained.

In the recent days, security forces have questioned residents and searched over 5000 apartments in Cairo's downtown, an area whose cafes, theatres and art galleries have been popular with young, pro-democracy activists. Administrators of Facebook pages organizing protests have also been detained.

El-Sissi's supporters, including several high-profile TV presenters and talk show hosts, have often justified actions by the police and security agencies as necessary to spare Egypt the chaos and bloodshed roiling regional neighbours like Libya, Syria and Iraq.


Latest Canada & World News

  • 'She will be missed': Calgary sisters remember triplet killed in Arizona

    Canada News CTV News
    A Calgary woman who was struck and killed by an out-of-control vehicle in Arizona is being remembered for her love of life and helping others. Patti Lou Doorbos, who went by the name Lou, died instantly when she and her husband, Ron Doornbos, 60, were hit by an SUV that jumped a median and crashed into them while they were standing on a sidewalk in Fountain Hills, Ariz. Source
  • Crown prince seeks Saudi image makeover on grand U.S. tour

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Saudi Arabia's young crown prince has an ambitious list of to-dos: modernize his conservative kingdom, weaken Iran's hand across the Mideast and, this week, rehabilitate his country's image in the eyes of Americans. Source
  • Facebook whistleblower pushed data-mining boundaries in Canada: source

    Canada News CBC News
    A Canadian data expert who set off an international uproar over the alleged leak of private Facebook user data lost his job years ago in the office of former Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff, in large part because he was pushing a nascent form of the controversial data-harvesting technique, says a former senior party insider. Source
  • Moscow awaits Russian diplomats ordered to leave Britain

    World News CTV News
    Moscow is awaiting nearly two dozen Russian diplomats ordered to leave Britain following a nerve agent attack on U.K. soil. The Russian Foreign Ministry told The Associated Press that the 23 diplomats are expected to leave British territory Tuesday. Source
  • No big woop, Kremlin says of Trump not congratulating Putin

    World News CTV News
    MOSCOW -- The Kremlin spokesman says it's no big deal that U.S. President Donald Trump didn't congratulate Vladimir Putin on his re-election as president. Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters Tuesday that he doesn't consider Trump's silence an "unfriendly move. Source
  • Autopsy planned to determine if Nain boy died of tuberculosis

    Canada News CBC News
    The residents of Nain are in shock after the death of a 14-year-old boy from the northern Labrador community died Sunday in St. John's — and fear it was tuberculosis. Gussie Bennett went from a clinic in Nain to Happy Valley-Goose Bay on Friday, and was then flown to St. Source
  • Ont. police lay charges in five investigations into social media threats

    Canada News CTV News
    Provincial police says five people have been charged with allegedly making threats against Ontario schools on social media. Police say they conducted six separate investigations into threats in the province's central division over the past few weeks, five of which resulted in charges. Source
  • Defence lays out history of pranks at trial into killing of Kim Jong-un's brother

    World News CBC News
    A woman accused of poisoning the North Korean leader's half-brother played a prank on a Vietnamese government official in Hanoi less than two weeks before the sensational killing, her lawyer told a Malaysian court on Tuesday. Source
  • Austrian faces fine for calling police officers 'smurfs'

    World News CTV News
    BERLIN - An Austrian man faces a 160-euro ($197) fine for describing police officers as "smurfs" in a warning about speed checks posted on Facebook. The Austria Press Agency reported Tuesday that authorities in Tyrol province imposed the fine on the man, whose name wasn't released, for violating "public decency" by "defaming two police officers. Source
  • Hidden camera reveals security breach at Hull Hospital lab

    Canada News CBC News
    A hidden camera investigation by Radio-Canada has revealed lax security at the hematology and biochemistry lab of the Hull Hospital, despite a 2017 warning from Quebec's professional order of medical technologists calling for the institution to restrict access. Source