Millions of Americans dig out after record-setting snowfall

NEW YORK -- Millions of Americans were preparing to dig themselves out Sunday after a mammoth blizzard with hurricane-force winds and record-setting snowfall brought much of the U.S.

See Full Article

East Coast to an icy standstill.

The travel ban that barred nonemergency vehicles from the roads of New York City was lifted at 7 a.m. Sunday by Gov. Andrew Cuomo. In Baltimore, a travel ban was also lifted, but some restrictions remain in place.

Meanwhile, mass transit systems that had been partially suspended during the storm were to be restored gradually.

But even as United Airlines said limited service might begin later in the afternoon in New York City, airports in the Washington D.C. area were likely to remain closed Sunday, and other airlines started to cut Monday service in addition to the 7,000 already-cancelled weekend flights.

The massive snowstorm brought both the nation's capital and its largest city to a stop, dumping as much as 3 feet (90 centimetres) of snow and stranding tens of thousands of travellers. At least 18 deaths were blamed on the weather, resulting from car crashes, shovelling snow and hypothermia.

The snow dropped 26.8 inches (68.1 centimetres) in Central Park, the second-most recorded since 1869. The snowfall narrowly missed tying the previous record of 26.9 inches (68.3 centimetres) set in February 2006. The snow finally stopped falling in New York City around 10 p.m. Saturday night, though authorities insisted people stay indoors and off the streets as crews plowed deserted roads and police set up checkpoints to catch violators.

The storm dropped snow from the Gulf Coast to New England, with areas of Washington surpassing 30 inches (76.2 centimetres). The heaviest unofficial report was in a rural area of West Virginia, not far from Harpers Ferry, with 40 inches (101.6 centimetre).

"This is kind of a Top 10 snowstorm," said weather service winter storm expert Paul Kocin, who co-wrote a two-volume textbook on blizzards.

The usually bustling New York City looked more like a ghost town. With Broadway shows dark, thin crowds shuffled through a different kind of Great White Way, the nickname for a section of the theatre district. And Bruce Springsteen cancelled Sunday's scheduled show at Madison Square Garden.

In Washington, monuments that would typically be busy with tourists stood vacant. All mass transit in the capital was to be shut down through Sunday.

Seventeen-year-old Alex Cruz, helping a neighbour shovel snow Saturday in Silver Spring, Maryland, couldn't help but notice the emptiness.

"It's like living out in the middle of Wyoming," he said.

Throughout the region, drivers skidded off snowy, icy roads in accidents that killed several people Friday and Saturday. Those killed included a 4-year-old boy in North Carolina; a Kentucky transportation worker who was plowing highways; and a woman whose car plunged down a 300-foot (91-meter) embankment in Tennessee. Three people died while shovelling snow in Queens and Staten Island.

An Ohio teenager sledding behind an all-terrain vehicle was hit by a truck and killed, and two people died of hypothermia in southwest Virginia. In North Carolina, a man whose car had veered off an icy-covered road was arrested on charges of killing a motorist who stopped to help.

In Kentucky, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, drivers were marooned for hours in snow-choked highways.

Roofs collapsed on a historic theatre in Virginia and a horse barn in Maryland, while seaside towns in New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland grappled with flooding.

The snow was whipped into a maelstrom by winds that reached 75 mph (120 kph) at Dewey Beach, Delaware, and Langley Air Force Base, Virginia, the weather service said. From Virginia to New York, sustained winds topped 30 mph (48 kph) and gusted to around 50 mph (80 kph). And if that weren't enough, the storm also had bursts of thunder and lightning.

Stranded travellers included Defence Secretary Ash Carter, whose high-tech aircraft, the Doomsday Plane, couldn't land at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland after returning from Europe. Carter was rerouted to Tampa, Florida.


Latest Canada & World News

  • Some provincial plans to crack down on distracted driving go too far: lawyer

    Canada News CTV News
    WINNIPEG -- A group that represents defence lawyers says some proposed laws aimed at cracking down on drivers distracted by hand-held electronic devices go too far. Manitoba and Ontario are two provinces planning to let police temporarily suspend the licences of drivers caught using hand-held cellphones and other equipment. Source
  • Dolphin pod trapped by sea ice in Newfoundland

    Canada News CTV News
    A pod of dolphins has become trapped by sea ice near Heart’s Delight-Islington, Newfoundland -- a small town roughly one-and-a-half hour’s drive from St. John’s. “Ice drove them in,” retired local fisherman Charlie Sooley told NTV on Monday. Source
  • Trump calls for death penalty to 'get tough' on drug pushers

    World News CBC News
    Unveiling a long-awaited plan to combat the national scourge of opioid drug addiction, U.S. President Donald Trump called Monday for stiffer penalties for drug traffickers, including the death penalty. "Toughness is the thing that they most fear," Trump said. Source
  • Charles Manson's remains cremated following court battle

    World News CTV News
    LOS ANGELES -- Charles Manson's cremated remains have been scattered nearly four months after the cult leader died in prison. A funeral was held Saturday following a court battle for the 83-year-old's remains. Pastor Mark Pitcher of the Church of the Nazarene in Porterville, California, says 20 to 25 people attended the funeral. Source
  • U.S. woman charged for transporting 6 people into the country near Quebec border

    Canada News CBC News
    A North Carolina woman is facing a charge for transporting people into the United States who didn't have permission to be in the country, according to a complaint filed Monday in federal court in Vermont. The complaint said that just after 2 a.m. Source
  • Judge allows father parenting time despite 'unorthodox beliefs' on white pride

    Canada News CTV News
    HALIFAX -- A Nova Scotia judge has allowed a Halifax-area father unsupervised parenting time with his child, despite the mother's objections over his "unorthodox beliefs" on white pride and other racial matters. In a written decision, Justice Carole Beaton of the provincial Supreme Court's family division said it's in the six-year-old's best interest to have contact with the father. Source
  • U.S. Supreme Court keeps revised Pennsylvania congressional map in place

    World News CBC News
    The U.S. Supreme Court is keeping in place a revised map of Pennsylvania's congressional districts, turning down a request from Republican leaders in the state Legislature. The court's order Monday declining to put on hold the revised map comes as incumbents and potential challengers are circulating petitions to get on the May primary ballot. Source
  • Cirque du Soleil performer killed in fall remembered as 'terrific person'

    Canada News CBC News
    Police in Tampa, Fla., say they have no reason to believe the fall that killed a Cirque du Soleil aerialist Saturday "is anything except a tragic accident," as their investigation into the death of Yann Arnaud continues this week. Source
  • Ontario father who died in Mexico 'had a need to spread love'

    Canada News CTV News
    An Ontario man killed in a motorcycle accident in Mexico is being remembered as a happy, outgoing, big-hearted father of four who had a contagious, booming laugh and did all he could to help others in both countries in which he lived. Source
  • Trump pitches his opioid crisis plan LIVE

    World News CBC News
    The National Today NEWSLETTER: Monday, March 19 Source