No immediate injuries after magnitude 6.8 earthquake hits Alaska

ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- A magnitude-6.8 earthquake knocked items off shelves and walls in south-central Alaska and jolted the nerves of residents in this earthquake-prone region.

See Full Article

But there were no immediate reports of injuries.

The earthquake struck about 1:30 a.m. Alaska time and was centred 53 miles west of Anchor Point in the Kenai Peninsula, which is about 160 miles southwest of Anchorage, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. About two hours later, a magnitude-4.3 aftershock hit the Cook Inlet.

The earthquake was widely felt by residents of Anchorage. But the Anchorage and Valdez police departments said they have not received any reports of injury or significant damage.

Ron Barta said his Anchorage home shook about 1:34 a.m. when the earthquake hit. The pictures on the walls started moving, but there was no damage to his house and no one was hurt, said Barta, 55.

"I was sitting here with the dogs getting ready to go to bed about 1:34 local time. ... I felt a little rumble that didn't quit for about 30 to 45 seconds. It felt like the house moved," said Barta, who is married to an Associated Press reporter.

Vincent Nusunginya, 34, of Kenai said he was at his girlfriend's house when the earthquake hit.

"It started out as a shaking and it seemed very much like a normal earthquake. But then it started to feel like a normal swaying, like a very smooth side-to-side swaying," said Nusunginya, director of audience at the Peninsula Clarion newspaper. "It was unsettling. Some things got knocked over, but there was no damage."

There were reports of scattered power outages from the Matanuska Electric Association and Chugach Electric in the Anchorage area. The Homer Electric Association reported on its website that about 4,800 customers were without power early Sunday in the Kenai Peninsula.

The Alaska Department of Transportation reported on its Facebook page that there was road damage near the community of Kasilof, on the Kenai Peninsula.

The KSRM (Radio Kenai) radio station in the Kenai peninsula said that about 2:30 a.m. the Kenai Fire Department was on the scene of a gas leak and explosion at a home. Fire departments in Kenai, Anchorage and other communities were getting calls about the quake.

A dispatcher for the Homer police department, who declined to identify herself, said no one called to report broken gas lines or any significant damage, but many called to report feeling the strong quake.

The violent shaking woke up Associated Press reporter Mark Thiessen, who had been asleep for about two hours when then quake struck.

"I remember the bed swaying back and forth, and loud noises, enough to wake me up even after taking sleeping pills," said Thiessen, 53. "My husband came into the bedroom forcefully saying, 'Get up! Get up!' " he said. "But I was already awake, trying to figure out what was happening."

The hashtag .akquake was trending early Sunday on Twitter, where people were sharing their experiences of the quake and posting photos of items that had fallen off walls and shelves.

People were saying on social media that the earthquake "was the biggest I ever felt as long as I have lived here," Barta said. One Twitter user wrote: "Everyone in Anchorage is awake and on Twitter right? Biggest longest .earthquake of my entire life. Family is all hanging in our bed now."

A tsunami is not expected as a result of the earthquake, the National Weather Service said.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • One dead, two injured in fire at Ontario youth home

    Canada News CTV News
    KAWARTHA LAKES, Ont. -- Ontario provincial police are investigating a fatal fire at a group home for teenagers in the Kawartha Lakes area. Members of the OPP's Kawartha Lakes Detachment were called to the youth facility northwest of the Village of Oakwook late Friday afternoon. Source
  • Turkish PM launches 'yes' campaign over Erdogan powers

    World News CBC News
    Turkey's prime minister has officially launched his ruling party's campaign for a "yes" vote in a referendum on ushering in a presidential system, which critics fear will concentrate too many powers in the hands of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Source
  • Suspect in deadly Kim Jong-nam attack says she got $90 for 'prank'

    World News CBC News
    The Indonesian woman who is one of the suspects in the killing of North Korean ruler Kim Jong-un's half brother said she was paid $90 for what she believed was a prank, an Indonesian official said Saturday. Source
  • Britain's 'extremely weak' opposition posing no challenge for PM Theresa May

    World News CBC News
    Winston Churchill is credited with once saying "Kites rise highest against the wind, not with it." The current British prime minister may illustrate the opposite, as Theresa May flies high, facing an opposition akin to a gentle breeze. Source
  • Hard, hard times again — sort of: Why a lot of N.L.'s fiscal problems are self-inflicted

    Canada News CBC News
    Dwight Ball, the affable pharmacist who has been Newfoundland and Labrador's premier for the last 15 months, said something remarkable Wednesday while swinging an axe through several hundred government jobs. "We're human, too. This impacts us," said Ball, who clearly has shown no relish for the more brutal parts of dealing with an oil-dependent economy during a collapse in petroleum prices. Source
  • Giant Tiger and other discounters in expansion mode

    Canada News CBC News
    Whenever Anna Maria Afable travels from British Columbia to visit her friends in Ontario, she makes a point to stop in at a Giant Tiger store. "We don't have it in B.C.," says Afable, as she browses through the fashion section at a location in Barrie, Ont, the newest of the discount chain's 200 stores across the country. Source
  • Want millennial voters? Conservatives must change, researchers say

    Canada News CBC News
    Researchers brought a sobering message to the annual convention of the right-leaning Manning Centre Friday: most voters under 35 aren't connecting with the conservative movement, and if it wants to reach them, more than just messaging needs to change. Source
  • Royal Canadian Mint struggles to make money: documents

    Canada News CBC News
    The Royal Canadian Mint just isn't making the money it used to. Revenue is down sharply, jobs have been chopped, morale is in the tank, and formerly successful lines of business are being shut down – even as the mint spends millions of dollars on new executive offices. Source
  • Muhammad Ali's son detained at Florida airport, questioned on religion

    World News CTV News
    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- A lawyer says the son of legendary boxer Muhammad Ali was detained by immigration officials at a Florida airport. Chris Mancini tells the Courier-Journal in Louisville, Kentucky that 44-year-old Muhammad Ali Jr. Source
  • U.S. government wants appeal of travel ban put on hold

    World News CTV News
    SEATTLE -- The Justice Department wants a federal appeals court to put U.S. President Donald Trump's travel ban case on hold until he issues a new order, but the states who sued to stop the ban want the case to move forward. Source