Israeli troops evict Jewish settlers from West Bank buildings

JERUSALEM -- Israeli forces on Friday evicted dozens of Jewish settlers from two buildings they moved into the day before in the heart of the flashpoint city of Hebron, near an important shrine holy to both Jews and Muslims in the West Bank.

See Full Article

The troops removed 80 people who had moved into the empty buildings and then they closed access to the sites, police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said. The buildings will remain shut until the courts determine who owns them, he said.

Supporters of the group said the settlers had entered houses that were bought legally. Selling property to Israelis is considered taboo in Palestinian society and is against Palestinian law. Some sellers have been killed by Palestinian gunmen. Those Palestinians that do sell fear for their lives and usually flee the territory. Real estate deals are often conducted confidentially to protect the sellers.

Hagit Ofran of Peace Now, an Israeli anti-settlement group, said the Palestinian owners are denying any purchase and are going to file legal documents to prove it. "Previous experience shows that some of these alleged deals are either forged, or only partial and then proven false," she said.

Israel captured the West Bank from Jordan in the 1967 war. Palestinians demand the territory as part of their future state. Most of the international community views Israeli settlements in the territory as illegal or illegitimate.

Israel says the fate of the settlements should be resolved in peace talks, along with other core issues like security and borders.

About 850 Israeli settlers in Hebron live in heavily-guarded enclaves, surrounded by tens of thousands of Palestinians. Much of the animosity in the biblical city is over a sensitive holy site known to Jews as the Tomb of the Patriarchs and to Muslims as the Ibrahimi Mosque.

Friday's eviction came as Israel is struggling to deal with months of near-daily Palestinian attacks on civilians and soldiers. Many Palestinian attackers over the past four months of bloodshed have been from Hebron.

Palestinian attackers have killed 25 Israelis and wounded dozens more since mid-September in stabbings, shootings and car ramming assaults. Some 146 Palestinians have been killed by Israeli fire during that time, and over a hundred of them have been identified by Israel as attackers. The rest were killed in clashes with Israeli troops.

Zeev Elkin, a pro-settler lawmaker from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's ruling Likud party, was among several lawmakers who condemned the latest eviction.

"This is the time to fight terror and strengthen and support the settlements and not to fight the settlers," Elkin said in a twitter post. He also called on the Israeli defence minister to overturn the eviction order.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • NEB warns Trans Mountain pipeline builder to stop installing mats in streams

    Canada News CTV News
    CALGARY -- The National Energy Board is issuing a stern warning to the company building the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion for installing mats in streams to discourage fish from spawning where the pipeline is to be built. Source
  • Toddler who accidentally shot father dead asking 'for his daddy': Relatives

    World News Toronto Sun
    ST. LOUIS — Relatives say a St. Louis toddler who killed his sleeping father while playing with a gun has been asking “for his daddy.” The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that police say the two-year-old accidentally shot 27-year-old Darrion Noble in the neck Saturday afternoon. Source
  • Mounties investigating after 2 men found dead in motel room in Moosomin

    Canada News CTV News
    MOOSOMIN, Sask. -- Mounties are investigating after two men were found dead in a motel room in southeastern Saskatchewan. RCMP were called Monday to a motel on the Trans-Canada Highway in Moosomin. Two men were dead inside one of the room. Source
  • Ireland sets timeline for abortion referendum

    World News CBC News
    Ireland plans to hold a referendum next May or June on whether it should loosen some of the strictest abortion laws in the world, Prime Minister Leo Varadkar said on Tuesday. Abortion has long been a divisive issue in once stridently Catholic Ireland where, after a debate elicited large street protests from both sides, a complete ban was lifted in 2013. Source
  • Man killed by swarm of bees while doing yard work

    World News Toronto Sun
    FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — A Massachusetts man attacked by a swarm of bees while doing yard work has died. Alison Dahl tells The Sun Chronicle of Attleboro that her husband, Eric Dahl, was blowing leaves from the lawn of their Foxborough home on Saturday afternoon when he was swarmed by bees. Source
  • U.S. slaps new sanctions on 8 North Korean banks

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- New U.S. sanctions will punish eight North Korean banks and 26 bank workers living abroad, the Trump administration announced Tuesday, in the first use of new sanctioning powers granted by U.S. President Donald Trump. Source
  • Dyson plans to make electric vehicles by 2020

    World News CBC News
    British vacuum and consumer goods giant Dyson says it plans to release a fully electric vehicle by 2020. Company founder James Dyson released the news in an email to staff that the company later made public. Source
  • Man claims to find maggots in convenience store sub wrapper

    World News Toronto Sun
    EWING, N.J. — A man claims he found maggots in a sandwich he ordered from a convenience store in New Jersey. Chris Garcia tells The Trentonian he bought a buffalo chicken cheesesteak hoagie Saturday from a Wawa store in Ewing, where he lives. Source
  • London police release all but one in subway attack investigation

    World News CTV News
    LONDON - British police have released all but one of the seven suspects they arrested over the recent attack on a London subway train. The three men released Tuesday face no further police action. Source
  • Equifax CEO resigns in wake of data breach

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    NEW YORK — Equifax CEO Richard Smith stepped down Tuesday, less than three weeks after the credit reporting agency disclosed a damaging data breach that exposed highly sensitive information for about 143 million Americans. His departure follows those of two other high-ranking executives who left in the wake of the company’s admission that hackers exploited a software flaw that it did not fix to access Social Security numbers, birthdates and other personal data that provide the keys to identify…