Squirmishes and pussyfooting: Sarah Palin's folksy Trump endorsement

Former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin delivered a rousin', roarin', rootin'-tootin' endorsement of Donald Trump, as she threw her support behind the Republican frontrunner at a GOP event in Iowa.

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The folksy, occasionally tongue-tied former governor of Alaska dropped several eyebrow-raising sound bites in her endorsement speech Tuesday, while she called for voters to stop "pussyfootin' around" and back Trump for president.

Her speech was filled with calls to fight the establishment and "make America great again" – Trump's slogan – but it was also packed with the mixed metaphors and word-tastrophes that are commonplace with Palin.

Here are some of the highlights (or lowlights) of Palin's remarks.

On Donald J. Trump vs. the GOP

Palin portrayed Trump as a benevolent multi-billionaire who identifies with "Joe six-pack," and who can come into the Republican Party and "bust up" the "establishment."

"He is from the private sector – not a politician. Can I get a hallelujah?" said Palin, who herself is a career politician.

She also praised Trump for "going rogue left and right, man," and suggested "that's why he's doing so well."

She went on to suggest that Trump wouldn't get a "high" off taxation, the way other politicians supposedly do.

"He doesn't get his power, his high, off of opium – other people's money – like a lot of dopes in Washington do," she said. "They're addicted to opium where they take other people's money."

Palin suggested that the other GOP candidates have been "wearing" political correctness "kinda like a suicide vest," and that Trump is the only one willing to tell the truth.

"He's got the guts to wear the issues that need to be spoken about and debated on his sleeve," Palin said, painting a mixed visual metaphor.

She accused the GOP of giving Barack Obama a "blank cheque" on healthcare, and of allowing him to turn "safety nets into hammocks."

Palin also borrowed a page out of former Toronto mayor Rob Ford's playbook, suggesting the anti-Trump Republicans are afraid they "won't be able to be slurpin' off the gravy train that's been feedin' them all these years."

On her audience

Palin repeatedly rattled off lists to describe the crowd on hand. Early in her speech, she referred to the gathered GOP voters as: "You farm families and teachers and teamsters and cops and cooks, you rock-and-rollers and holy rollers."

Later in the speech, she referred to Trump-backers as "right-wing and bitter clinging proud clingers of our guns, our God and our religions and our constitution."

"We're not gonna chill," she added. "It's time to drill, baby, drill."

On Obama

Palin attacked Obama multiple times during her speech, calling him a "weak-kneed capitulator-in-chief," and a leader "with the skills of a community organizer, maybe organizing neighbourhood tea."

Later in the speech, she implored her audience to picture the day Obama leaves the White House and heads back to Chicago, taking with him "the teleprompters and the selfie sticks and the Greek columns and all that hokey-changey stuff." She then suggested Obama would, at some point, look up in Chicago and see a shining Trump Tower standing above him.

On foreign policy

In discussing U.S. foreign policy, Palin accused the Obama administration of being too weak to handle conflict in the Middle East, against such "enemies" as the "I-ranians" and the Islamic State. Palin called those conflicts "squirmishes" that "have been going on for hundreds of years… where they're fighting each other, yelling Allah Akbar, calling jihad on each other's heads forever and ever."

Palin then suggested: "Let 'em duke it out, and let all us sort it out."

Palin also suggested Trump would support America's troops, and help them "Kick ISIS' ass!"

Later, Palin closed her speech with one of the most bewildering statements of the night.

"You're ready to stop the race-baiting and the division based on colour and zip code," she told the Trump supporters in attendance.

Trump, of course, has proposed several highly divisive notions, such as barring all non-American Muslims from entering the country, and building a wall along the U.S-Mexican border.

"Make America great again!" she said.



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