Squirmishes and pussyfooting: Sarah Palin's folksy Trump endorsement

Former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin delivered a rousin', roarin', rootin'-tootin' endorsement of Donald Trump, as she threw her support behind the Republican frontrunner at a GOP event in Iowa.

See Full Article

The folksy, occasionally tongue-tied former governor of Alaska dropped several eyebrow-raising sound bites in her endorsement speech Tuesday, while she called for voters to stop "pussyfootin' around" and back Trump for president.

Her speech was filled with calls to fight the establishment and "make America great again" – Trump's slogan – but it was also packed with the mixed metaphors and word-tastrophes that are commonplace with Palin.

Here are some of the highlights (or lowlights) of Palin's remarks.

On Donald J. Trump vs. the GOP

Palin portrayed Trump as a benevolent multi-billionaire who identifies with "Joe six-pack," and who can come into the Republican Party and "bust up" the "establishment."

"He is from the private sector – not a politician. Can I get a hallelujah?" said Palin, who herself is a career politician.

She also praised Trump for "going rogue left and right, man," and suggested "that's why he's doing so well."

She went on to suggest that Trump wouldn't get a "high" off taxation, the way other politicians supposedly do.

"He doesn't get his power, his high, off of opium – other people's money – like a lot of dopes in Washington do," she said. "They're addicted to opium where they take other people's money."

Palin suggested that the other GOP candidates have been "wearing" political correctness "kinda like a suicide vest," and that Trump is the only one willing to tell the truth.

"He's got the guts to wear the issues that need to be spoken about and debated on his sleeve," Palin said, painting a mixed visual metaphor.

She accused the GOP of giving Barack Obama a "blank cheque" on healthcare, and of allowing him to turn "safety nets into hammocks."

Palin also borrowed a page out of former Toronto mayor Rob Ford's playbook, suggesting the anti-Trump Republicans are afraid they "won't be able to be slurpin' off the gravy train that's been feedin' them all these years."

On her audience

Palin repeatedly rattled off lists to describe the crowd on hand. Early in her speech, she referred to the gathered GOP voters as: "You farm families and teachers and teamsters and cops and cooks, you rock-and-rollers and holy rollers."

Later in the speech, she referred to Trump-backers as "right-wing and bitter clinging proud clingers of our guns, our God and our religions and our constitution."

"We're not gonna chill," she added. "It's time to drill, baby, drill."

On Obama

Palin attacked Obama multiple times during her speech, calling him a "weak-kneed capitulator-in-chief," and a leader "with the skills of a community organizer, maybe organizing neighbourhood tea."

Later in the speech, she implored her audience to picture the day Obama leaves the White House and heads back to Chicago, taking with him "the teleprompters and the selfie sticks and the Greek columns and all that hokey-changey stuff." She then suggested Obama would, at some point, look up in Chicago and see a shining Trump Tower standing above him.

On foreign policy

In discussing U.S. foreign policy, Palin accused the Obama administration of being too weak to handle conflict in the Middle East, against such "enemies" as the "I-ranians" and the Islamic State. Palin called those conflicts "squirmishes" that "have been going on for hundreds of years… where they're fighting each other, yelling Allah Akbar, calling jihad on each other's heads forever and ever."

Palin then suggested: "Let 'em duke it out, and let all us sort it out."

Palin also suggested Trump would support America's troops, and help them "Kick ISIS' ass!"

Later, Palin closed her speech with one of the most bewildering statements of the night.

"You're ready to stop the race-baiting and the division based on colour and zip code," she told the Trump supporters in attendance.

Trump, of course, has proposed several highly divisive notions, such as barring all non-American Muslims from entering the country, and building a wall along the U.S-Mexican border.

"Make America great again!" she said.


Latest Canada & World News

  • What's happening in Muskrat Falls? Here's a primer

    Canada News CBC News
    The fight over the Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project in Labrador appears to have stopped short of reaching a crisis point — including fears around the fate of three protesters staging a hunger strike — for now. Source
  • CMHC plays catch-up with vaguely alarming house price warning: Don Pittis

    Canada News CBC News
    Warnings about the Canadian property market are nothing new. International business publications and global banks have been calling it a bubble for years. Nobody listened. Now that the Crown corporation that insures residential mortgages, the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, has added its voice with what turns out to be a mushy and moderate warning, will anybody listen? Source
  • Justin Trudeau protest marks 'turning point' for frustrated youth

    Canada News CBC News
    Tuesday's protests against Prime Minister Justin Trudeau reflect a growing discontent over a lack of Liberal action on affordable education and jobs for young Canadians, youth leaders say. And they warn that more demonstrations are likely on the way. Source
  • Early voting shows good news for Clinton in key battlegrounds

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON - Millions of votes that have been cast already in the U.S. presidential election point to an advantage for Hillary Clinton in critical battleground states. Data compiled by The Associated Press also show signs of Democratic strength in traditionally Republican territory. Source
  • Montreal borough to adopt bylaw in bid to stem tide of gentrification

    Canada News CTV News
    MONTREAL - A gritty Montreal neighbourhood with roots that date back to the industrialization of Canada is trying to stop itself from turning into an enclave of trendy, upscale restaurants and little else. A zoning bylaw set for a final vote on Tuesday would prevent new restaurants from setting up within 25 metres of an existing establishment. Source
  • European Parliament officials embarrassed by trade deal impasse with Canada

    World News CBC News
    The European Union's inability to complete a trade agreement with Canada is an embarrassment and could harm its ability to negotiate future deals, a European Parliament vice president said in a radio interview. The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) has been seven years in the making and is backed by all 27 other EU governments but was rejected by the French-speaking south of Belgium, meaning Belgium as a whole cannot sign it. Source
  • Syria school airstrike could be deadliest yet: UNICEF

    World News CBC News
    The UN Children's agency called the airstrikes in Syria's rebel-held northern Idlib province a day earlier an "outrage", suggesting it may be the deadliest attack on a school since the country's war began nearly six years ago. Source
  • Some begin to waver from Trump in normally Republican Ohio suburbs

    World News CTV News
    MASON, Ohio - James Stepp says he is an Ohio Republican who is supporting Democrat Hillary Clinton. His reason? A Trump presidency, he says, would damage the GOP for years to come. "The party needs to jettison Donald Trump in order to survive," said Stepp, 29, of Franklin, in Warren County. Source
  • Small quakes continue to shake Italy

    World News CTV News
    MILAN -- A series of small temblors have continued to shake a mountainous region of central Italy, further unsettling thousands of residents displaced by a pair of powerful aftershocks to the deadly August quake. Italy's national volcanology center said two smaller quakes registered magnitudes above 4 before dawn Thursday, centered near Macerata in the Marche region, while dozens of smaller ones were recorded in the area overnight. Source
  • Officials begin assessing damage after quake hits central Itlay

    World News CTV News
    VISSO, Italy - Officials in central Italy began early Thursday to assess the damage caused by a pair of strong earthquakes in the same region of central Italy hit by a deadly quake in August, as an appeal went out for temporary housing adequate for the cold mountain temperatures. Source