U.K. lawmakers debate banning Donald Trump from Britain

UK lawmakers debate banning Donald Trump from Britain@

By Jill Lawless@

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS@

LONDON -- British lawmakers argued Monday over whether Donald Trump should be excluded from the U.K.

See Full Article

for his anti-Muslim remarks, with one legislator cautioning that a ban would give the Republican presidential hopeful a "halo of victimhood."

Parliament took up the topic after half a million people signed a petition call for Trump to be excluded after he called for a temporary ban on Muslims entering the U.S. Trump has also claimed that some areas of Britain are so radicalized that police fear for their lives.

Labour Party legislator Paul Flynn, who opened the debate, said "it would be a grave error" to ban Trump and allow him to appear a victim.

"I think we might already be in error in giving him far too much attention," said Flynn, who heads Parliament's Petitions Committee.

But another Labour legislator, Tulip Siddique, supported a ban.

"This is a man who is extremely high-profile ... a man who is interviewing for the most important job in the world," she said. "His words are not comical, his words are not funny. His words are poisonous."

More than 500,000 people have signed an online petition backing a ban on Trump, who owns a golf resort in Scotland, the land of his mother's birth.

Under British law, any petition supported by 100,000 people -- who must provide and confirm an email address -- is considered for parliamentary debate.

Monday's debate won't result in a vote.

Prime Minister David Cameron has condemned Trump's remarks as "divisive, stupid and wrong," but he and other senior officials have said they do not think Trump should be banned.

The government has the power to deny entry to people with criminal convictions or those whose presence is considered not "conducive to the public good." The power has been used against figures as diverse as boxer Mike Tyson, rapper Tyler the Creator, radical Muslim preachers and the late Christian fundamentalist Fred Phelps Sr.

Few politicians have been banned, although Britain turned away anti-Islam Dutch legislator Geert Wilders at an airport in 2009. Wilders later sued and won the right to come to Britain.

Flynn said the public profile of Wilders' anti-Muslims views "was multiplied one hundredfold by the ban," and he did not want the same thing to happen with Trump.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • In final act as president, Obama commutes 330 drug sentences

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON - In his last major act as president, Barack Obama is cutting short the sentences of 330 federal inmates convicted of drug crimes. The move brings Obama's bid to correct what he's called a systematic injustice to a climactic close. Source
  • Cops can fix small errors on tickets after issuing them, Appeal Court rules

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO -- An officer who fixes minor mistakes after issuing a ticket does not affect its validity, the Ontario Court of Appeal ruled Thursday. The ruling, which clarifies inconsistent lower court rulings, restores driving convictions against two motorists. Source
  • Feds knew of suicide pact, didn’t respond: First Nations community

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    OTTAWA — Health Canada was aware of escalating fear that a suicide pact was taking shape in a remote northern Ontario First Nation, but said no to financial assistance, angry and frustrated indigenous leaders complained Thursday. The community of Wapekeka First Nation made the federal government aware in July 2016 that some of their young people were struggling with mental health challenges, and asked for $376,706 to tackle the problem, the leaders told a news conference. Source
  • Obama releases final batch of bin Laden documents

    World News Toronto Sun
    WASHINGTON — In its final hours, the Obama administration on Thursday released the last of three installments of documents belonging to Osama bin Laden that were seized in a 2011 raid that killed the al-Qaida leader in his secret compound. Source
  • 'I'm sorry to bother you but I just killed my wife': English man to emergency line operator

    World News Toronto Sun
    “I'm sorry to bother you but I just killed my wife.” That was the sheepish confession a 999 operator — England's 911 equivalent — fielded last summer from an English man who allegedly stabbed his wife in retaliation for an unsatisfactory dinner. Source
  • Trudeau's language flap puts English-language health services in Quebec under microscope

    Canada News CBC News
    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's decision to answer a question about access to mental health services in French at a town hall event in Sherbrooke, Que., pushed a thorny, longstanding concern of anglophone Quebecers back into the spotlight. Source
  • Trump arrives in Washington with a wave and a salute

    World News Toronto Sun
    WASHINGTON — Ready for his big moment, Donald Trump traded in his beloved private plane for a military jet Thursday and swooped into Washington for three days of inaugural festivities. As the president-elect left New York behind, the capital braced for an onslaught of inaugural crowds and demonstrators numbering in the hundreds of thousands. Source
  • Trump sweeps into Washington with a wave and a salute

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Ready for his big moment, Donald Trump swept into Washington on a military jet Thursday and quickly set to building better ties to the Republican Congress as he kicked off three days of inaugural festivities. Source
  • Suspected WWII bomb found in River Thames in London

    World News Toronto Sun
    LONDON — Two of London’s busiest bridges were closed Thursday and roads cordoned off after a suspected Second World War bomb was found in the River Thames. The Metropolitan Police force said officers were called Thursday afternoon “to reports of suspected World War II ordnance in the river. Source
  • Trump could bring more 'stable' foreign policy, Stephen Harper says

    Canada News CBC News
    Former prime minister Stephen Harper says he is taking a "glass half full" approach to the ascendancy of Donald Trump to the White House, while acknowledging the U.S. election is to blame for a great deal of uncertainty. Source