Sparks fly at fourth Democratic primary debate

CHARLESTON, S.C. -- Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders jumped headlong into Sunday night's presidential debate by tangling over who's tougher on gun control and sketching sharply differing visions for the future of health care in America.

See Full Article

It was the last Democratic matchup before voting in the 2016 primary race begins in two weeks, with both sides intent on seizing the momentum.

Clinton rapped Sanders, the Vermont senator, for voting repeatedly with the National Rifle Association, and then welcomed his weekend reversal of position to support legislation that would deny gun manufacturers legal immunity.

Sanders, in turn, said Clinton's assertion that he kowtowed to the gun lobby was "disingenuous."

On health care, Sanders released his plan for a government-run single-payer plan just hours before the debate, and used his opening statement to call for health care "for every man, woman and child as a right." Clinton, by contrast, urged less sweeping action to build on President Barack Obama's health care plan.

The debate over gun control -- an ongoing conflict between Clinton and Sanders -- took on special import given the setting. The debate took plan just blocks from the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church where nine parishioners were killed during Bible study last summer. Gun control has emerged as a central theme in the race, with Clinton citing the issue as one of the major differences between the candidates.

On Saturday night, Sanders announced his support for legislation that would reverse a 2005 law he had supported that granted gun manufacturers legal immunity.

His changed position came in a statement after days of criticism from Clinton, who had attempted to use his previous vote to undercut his liberal image.

In an interview with Time magazine on Sunday, Sanders said that his plan would ultimately save taxpayers money by lowering their health care bills.

Sanders, meanwhile, has questioned Clinton's liberal credentials, casting the former secretary of state as a Wall Street ally who will switch her positions for political gain. But he's vowed to forgo negative attacks, a position that may be hard to maintain as the race intensifies.

Both candidates are competing for black voters in South Carolina, which hosts the fourth primary contest. At a party fundraising dinner Saturday night, they vowed to change criminal justice policies.

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, who's been stuck in single digits since announcing his campaign last spring, also will be on the debate stage. The evening offers perhaps his last chance to improve his standing in the race.

The debate was sponsored by NBC, YouTube and the Congressional Black Caucus Institute.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Mexican mafia ran jail crime like an 'illegal government,' L.A. authorities say

    World News CTV News
    LOS ANGELES - The Los Angeles jails are run by the county sheriff, but the Mexican Mafia wielded the power in the underworld behind bars. Authorities say they diminished the influence of the organization made up of leaders from various Latino gangs. Source
  • B.C. firefighters tackling new wildfires near Kamloops and Lillooet

    Canada News CTV News
    VANCOUVER - Firefighters in British Columbia have been called out to deal with a pair of new wildfires. The BC Wildfire Service says crews and aircraft are tackling a wildfire measuring about 50 hectares about 55 kilometres northwest of Kamloops and producing smoke that is visible in several communities in the region. Source
  • Newly released reports highlight chaos of Las Vegas shooting

    World News CTV News
    LAS VEGAS - Gunshots came so rapidly during the deadliest mass shooting in the nation's modern history that one Las Vegas police officer feared he was facing a fully stocked assault team with tactical gear. Source
  • Republicans to meet with intelligence officials on Russia probe

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON - House and Senate lawmakers are set to meet with top intelligence officials as U.S. President Donald Trump raises new suspicions about the federal investigation into his 2016 campaign. In recent days, Trump has been zeroing in on and sometimes embellishing reports that a longtime U.S. Source
  • North Korea slams 'ignorant' Pence remarks, threatens to scrap summit

    World News CTV News
    TOKYO - North Korea has renewed its threat to pull out of a summit next month with U.S. President Donald Trump, saying it is just as ready to meet in a nuclear confrontation as at the negotiating table. Source
  • Two killed after train plows into truck stopped on tracks in Italy

    World News CTV News
    ROME - A regional train plowed into a big-rig truck stopped on the tracks outside the northern Italian city of Turin late Wednesday, killing at least two people and injuring 18, authorities said. Rescuers worked through the night to make sure no passengers were trapped in the wreckage. Source
  • FBI works to thwart major cyberattack on Ukraine

    World News CTV News
    LONDON - The FBI has put a spoke in the wheel of a major Russian digital disruption operation potentially aimed at causing havoc in Ukraine, evidence pieced together from researchers, Ukrainian officials and U.S. court documents indicates. Source
  • North Korea renews threat to quit summit with Trump

    World News CBC News
    North Korea has renewed its threat to pull out of a summit next month with U.S. President Donald Trump, saying it is just as ready to meet in a nuclear confrontation as at the negotiating table. Source
  • 2,000 people forced from homes as 51 fires rage across Manitoba

    Canada News CTV News
    More than 2,000 people have been forced from their homes, at least 600 from the Little Grand Rapids and Pauingassi First Nations, as dozens of wildfires blaze through Manitoba. There are 51 fires currently active in the province. Source
  • U.S. launches national security probe of vehicle imports

    World News CBC News
    The Trump administration on Wednesday launched a national security investigation into car and truck imports that could lead to new U.S. tariffs similar to those imposed on imported steel and aluminum in March. The Commerce Department said the probe under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 would investigate whether vehicle and parts imports were threatening the industry's health and ability to research and develop new, advanced technologies. Source