How Donald Trump loomed over the state of the union

WASHINGTON -- Donald Trump woke up Wednesday morning basking in the opprobrium of the entire Washington political establishment.

The reality-TV-star-turned-presidential contender was not just the unspoken target of Barack Obama's state of the union address.

See Full Article

He was also the unnamed antagonist in his own party's reply to the speech, delivered by South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley.

Both speeches warned against immigrant- and minority-bashing in a country that owes much of its historic prosperity to the labour of immigrants.

From hundreds of kilometres away, Trump once again managed to wiggle his way into the centre of Washington's political conversation.

And he scoffed in the general direction of its disdain.

"The state of the union speech was one of the most boring, rambling and non-substantive I have heard in a long time. New leadership fast!" he tweeted.

Trump called Haley weak on illegal immigration in a "Today Show" interview. He also mused that she was off to a bad start if she wanted to be his pick for vice-president.

Trump has horrified the political establishment with his call for the mass-deportation of undocumented Latino migrants and a freeze on Muslim travel to the U.S.

The reaction to Tuesday's speeches showed that the starkest divisions in U.S. politics aren't merely between the parties -- but within them, as Republican elites align against much of their party rank-and-file.

Haley reminded viewers that she was the daughter of immigrants from India.

And she, the Republican party's chosen spokesperson for the biggest evening on the U.S. political calendar, delivered a staunchly pro-immigrant message that declared no foreigner willing to work hard should feel unwelcome in the U.S.

"During anxious times, it can be tempting to follow the siren call of the angriest voices. We must resist that temptation," she said.

Haley confirmed Wednesday that Trump was one of the people she had in mind when she uttered those words.

As for Obama, he delivered a riff on Trump's campaign slogan -- "Make America Great Again."

In his final speech to Congress, the president said that the genius of the country was its perennial willingness to embrace change -- and ability to ignore the angriest anti-foreign voices "promising to restore past glory."

Obama then specifically mentioned Muslims.

"We need to reject any politics that targets people because of race or religion," he said.

"When politicians insult Muslims, when a mosque is vandalized, or a kid bullied, that doesn't make us safer. That's not telling it like it is. It's just wrong."

Democrats in the chamber cheered loudly. Behind Obama, the Republican congressional leader Paul Ryan gently nodded to signal his agreement.

These are sensitive topics within the Republican party.

Indeed, some prominent conservative voices later expressed disbelief that the party establishment appeared to have opposed Trump -- instead of embracing his populist message.

Radio host Laura Ingraham said the party should be sympathetic to his message on illegal immigration -- and side with American workers struggling to compete with cheap foreign labour.

Conservative commentator Ann Coulter put it more crudely: "Trump should deport Nikki Haley."

And that prompted the chairman of the South Carolina Republican party to defend the governor, and to call Coulter's remarks "despicable."

The divisions in the party pitting its business wing against the anti-establishment ranks will be a prominent theme in the upcoming nomination races -- which start next month in Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina.

The winner of those contests goes on to the general election, which will decide who delivers the next state of the union.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • EU agencies housed in Britain plan to move to Netherlands, France

    World News CBC News
    Amsterdam and Paris won the right to host the two EU agencies that must leave London after Brexit in a dramatic ministerial meeting in Brussels that ended in tie votes and the drawing of lots. The European Medicines Authority (EMA), a key player in the continent's healthcare industry, will go to Amsterdam, which topped the favourite Milan. Source
  • Man and woman charged with manslaughter in July homicide in Burnaby, B.C.

    Canada News CTV News
    BURNABY, B.C. -- A fatal assault in a Burnaby, B.C., coffee shop more than four months ago has resulted in manslaughter charges against a man and woman. The Integrated Homicide Investigation Team says in a news release that 40-year-old Lawrence Sharpe and 35-year-old Oldouz Pournouruz were expected in provincial court Monday. Source
  • ICC seeks to investigate CIA, U.S. military for alleged war crimes

    World News CBC News
    The prosecutor of the International Criminal Court has asked judges to authorize an investigation in Afghanistan of allegations of war crimes by the U.S. military and CIA, crimes against humanity by the Taliban and war crimes by Afghan security forces. Source
  • Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip celebrate 70th wedding anniversary

    World News CBC News
    Below, Princess Elizabeth talks to her husband Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, at the Royal Horse Show at Windsor, England, on May 12, 1949. She married naval officer Philip Mountbatten at Westminster Abbey on Nov. 20, 1947. Source
  • Della Reese, singer and Touched by an Angel actress, dead at 86

    World News CBC News
    Della Reese, the actress and gospel-influenced singer who in middle age found her greatest fame as Tess, the wise angel in the long-running television drama Touched by an Angel, has died at age 86. Reese's co-star on the series, Roma Downey, said in a statement that the actress died peacefully Sunday evening in her home in the Los Angeles area. Source
  • Argentina says calls did not come from missing submarine

    World News CTV News
    MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina -- Satellite calls that had raised hopes of finding an Argentine submarine that has been lost at sea for five days did not come from the 44 crew members on board, Argentina's navy said Monday, complicating an international rescue effort that has already been hindered by stormy weather. Source
  • Child advocate's report urges more consistency, care to help LGBTQ youth

    Canada News CTV News
    EDMONTON -- A new report says changes need to be made to help LGBTQ youth who are struggling in Alberta's child-welfare and justice systems. Child and youth advocate Del Graff says LGBTQ youth need not only more support, but more say and options in how they are treated. Source
  • 'We are very pleased:' Notley says Nebraska's Keystone OK means energy security

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO -- Alberta Premier Rachel Notley says Nebraska's decision to allow TransCanada's Keystone XL pipeline to run through that state brings North America closer to greater energy security. Nebraska's Public Service Commission today approved the pipeline's passage in a 3-2 vote, although not along the preferred route for the $10-billion project. Source
  • The National Today: Finding Mugabe a home, stark shooting stats, fatberg blues

    World News CBC News
    Welcome to The National Today daily newsletter, which takes a closer look at what's happening around the day's most important stories. Sign up here under "Subscribe to The National's newsletter," and it will be delivered directly to your inbox Monday to Friday. Source
  • New York Times reporter suspended in harassment probe

    World News CTV News
    NEW YORK -- The New York Times says it has suspended White House reporter Glenn Thrush while it investigates charges that he made unwanted advances on young women while he worked as a reporter at Politico and the Times. Source