Mexican government moving 'El Chapo' constantly from cell to cell

MEXICO CITY -- Mexico's government is moving Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman constantly from cell to cell inside the maximum security prison where he is being held, the same lockup the elusive drug lord escaped from through a tunnel six months ago.

See Full Article

Government spokesman Eduardo Sanchez said Guzman has been moved eight times at the Altiplano prison after he was recaptured Friday. The prison also now has 24-hour video surveillance of Guzman including all parts of his cell. The cell from which he escaped in July had a blind spot around the shower, which officials at the time was intended to protect inmates' privacy.

"He is being changed from cell to cell without a pattern... he is only spending hours or a couple of days in the same cell," Sanchez said late Tuesday night.

July's escape was Guzman's second from a maximum security prison and it deeply embarrassed the government of President Enrique Pena Nieto. It also created friction with Washington, which had sought his extradition to the United States. This time around, Mexican officials have said they are willing to extradite Guzman but warn the process could take a year. In the meantime, they appear to be taking extraordinary measure to prevent a third escape.

"Since he arrived, he has been in eight different cells," Sanchez said of Guzman's time in prison.

Guzman's recapture followed the most intensive manhunt in modern Mexican history, with at least 2,500 security and intelligence agents dedicated to getting him.

The government says the hunt involved piecing together information from intelligence, data, interrogations and raids -- as well as monitoring actors Sean Penn and Kate del Castillo as they came to interview the world's most wanted trafficker.

Federal officials who were not authorized to be quoted by name said that a significant part of the 2,500-strong force hunting the drug lord were soldiers sent into the mountains where he was hiding, to set up a security perimeter.

While Penn expressed surprise that a soldier at a checkpoint allowed his vehicle through on the way to the meeting with Guzman in October, one of the officials said that action had proved "very useful" in the hunt, suggesting it was part of the plan.

While Mexican authorities had spent decades chasing Guzman, the chase following his July escape from a top-security prison was different for two reasons, said a former government intelligence official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn't authorized to discuss the case.

"One, El Chapo stopped being clandestine. He left the mountain. He met with people, as we now know. That made it easier for intelligence units to find him," said the ex-official, who maintains sources inside security operations. "The other factor: there were, from the time of the escape, 2,500 people from various security agencies exclusively dedicated ... to mount a successful operation."

Even so, it took six months to catch him, with Mexican news media carrying repeated reports of marine raids into the mountains of Guzman's native Sinaloa state.

Guzman was nabbed early Friday morning after a shootout in the city of Los Mochis that killed five of his men and wounded one marine.

The former official interviewed Guzman when he was arrested the first time in 1993 and led operations over the years in the remote mountains of Sinaloa and Durango states, known as the Golden Triangle, after Guzman first escaped a maximum security facility in 2001. He said the size of those operations involved only around 60 troops, not hundreds.

"It was obviously expensive, but they knew they had to flush Chapo Guzman out," said Michael Vigil, former head of international operations at the Drug Enforcement Administration, who also was briefed on the operation. "The only way was by saturating the area where he was.

"It caused him to go to a safe house in Los Mochis. He knew that was going to make him vulnerable, but he had no choice.

Every phone call or text, every movement in the region was analyzed, the ex-official said, including Guzman's Oct. 2 meeting with Penn and del Castillo.

He and Vigil said that Del Castillo's phone calls, texts and other communications must have been monitored since she had her first real contact with Guzman last year, while he was still in prison. Everyone wanted to tell his story, but he said he would only work with the Mexican actress, who the ex-official called "Mexico's Sharon Stone."

"The movie was secondary. The first motivation was meeting Kate del Castillo and striking a relationship there," Vigil said, citing intelligence sources. One of the federal officials confirmed that Guzman appeared to be infatuated with Del Castillo, apparently referring to her by the code name "Hermosa," or "Beautiful."

Four days after Penn's Oct. 2 interview, soldiers staged fierce operations in the area of Tamazula, Durango, where the meeting with Penn and Del Castillo took place. The ex-official said it took that time to put together the intelligence and mount a raid.

In the end, Guzman narrowly escaped.

Security teams had kept watch on several properties related to Guzman in and around Los Mochis since October, he said. But it was only last week that they started noticing a flurry of activity in one of the houses in an upscale neighbourhood. Intelligence indicated that Guzman's wife, Emma Coronel, had arrived with their twin daughters to celebrate the Feast of the Three Kings, a major Christmas-season holiday for Mexican children.

The timing wasn't an accident, the ex-official said. Holidays and birthdays are the best times to catch suspects.

"They try to be with family, and intelligence units take advantage of these contacts to find out where they are," he said.

In the end, the ex-official attributed Guzman's capture to the drug lord "losing his footing."

When they first met, Guzman was a mid-level capo without the folk hero image he has today. He was cautious and humble, addressing authorities in the most formal manner of speech. He could barely write, but is very intelligent, the ex-official said.

Today, the official said, he sees a man who let his ego take over.

Authorities found DVD's of Del Castillo's series, "The Queen of the South," in which she plays a drug lord, when they raided his Los Mochis home. Both Penn and the government said Guzman hoped to arrange his own movie.

"He fell in love with his own legend," the ex-official said.


Latest Canada & World News

  • Miss Iceland quits pageant after being told she was 'too fat' to compete

    World News Toronto Sun
    Miss Iceland says she has quit an international beauty pageant because organizers told her she was “too fat” to compete. Arna Yr Jonsdottir, 20, became an Internet hero after she shared a letter on Instagram accusing officials at the Miss Grand International of criticizing her body size and suggesting she go on a crash diet. Source
  • 'Enough of the Clintons,' Trump says, while Michelle Obama campaigns with Hillary

    World News CBC News
    Seeking to lash Hillary Clinton to her husband's sprawling post-presidential empire, Donald Trump accused the couple of turning to corruption to enrich themselves while in public service. On Thursday, the Republican nominee cited newly released emails from her campaign chairman's personal account showing Doug Band, a former Bill Clinton aide, describing overlapping relationships between the Clinton Foundation and the family's private gains. Source
  • Girls say they were sexually assaulted by female basketball coach

    World News Toronto Sun
    Two girls who claim they were sexually assaulted by their junior high basketball coach are now suing the school district. According to the Chicago Sun-Times, Cara Labus, 32, was busted in January 2015 and accused of sexually abusing two girls - between the ages of 14 and 16 at the time - while she was their teacher and basketball coach. Source
  • Drug king El Chapo 'sex-starved' in jail

    World News Toronto Sun
    Mexico’s most feared drug baron -- Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman-- is moaning that he’s sleep deprived and sex-starved. The pint-sized drug pusher may even be losing his marbles, the Los Angeles Times reports. The newspaper claims Guzman is suffering memory loss and hallucinations, quoting his lawyers and a psychiatrist. Source
  • Firefighters, police trying to rescue driver after car plunges into Lake Ontario

    Canada News CBC News
    Toronto police said two people jumped into Lake Ontario to try and rescue at least one person who was in a car that plunged into the water on Thursday afternoon, police say. Firefighters and police are still looking for the submerged vehicle and whoever was inside, police tweeted around an hour after they were alerted to the emergency. Source
  • Turkey urges extradition of Muslim cleric over failed coup

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Turkey's justice minister on Thursday pressed the United States to extradite a Muslim cleric it accuses of orchestrating the July failed coup attempt or risk seriously harming relations between the two countries. Bekir Bozdag, who spoke to reporters a day after meeting with U.S. Source
  • Guilty plea to charge in Rutgers webcam suicide case

    World News Toronto Sun
    NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. — A former Rutgers University student whose roommate killed himself after being secretly recorded on a web camera kissing another man pleaded guilty Thursday to attempted invasion of privacy. Dharun Ravi’s plea comes after a New Jersey appeals court last month threw out a 15-count conviction against him and ordered a new trial on other counts. Source
  • Trump U staff included drug trafficker, child molester

    World News Toronto Sun
    WASHINGTON — Donald Trump says he hand-picked only the best to teach success at Trump University. But dozens of those hired by the company had checkered pasts — including serious financial problems and even convictions for cocaine trafficking or child molestation, an Associated Press investigation has found. Source
  • Death of asthmatic teen who saw shooting ruled a homicide

    World News Toronto Sun
    Chicago authorities say the death of a teenage girl who suffered an asthma attack after witnessing a fatal shooting at a block party was a homicide. Police say a dispute over a parking spot on the South Side led to gunfire last July. Source
  • Feds: Pooper scooper pretended to be Secret Service agent

    World News CTV News
    PITTSBURGH -- A man whose company scoops up pet poop has been charged with flashing a fake Secret Service ID and badge during a traffic stop and using it to get the "government rate" for a hotel room. Source