Iraq's PM vows to continue fight against Islamic State in wake of mall attack

BAGHDAD - Iraq's prime minister vowed on Tuesday to continue the fight against Islamic State militants, a day after the group launched a suicide attack on a shopping mall in the capital, Baghdad, killing 18 people.

See Full Article

Touring the bombed and destroyed mall in the eastern Shiite-dominated area of New Baghdad, Haider al-Abadi described the attack as a "desperate attempt" by militants after they lost control of the key western city of Ramadi, the capital of Anbar province.

Iraq's government will "spare no efforts" to expel IS forces from the country, al-Abadi said.

Gunmen stormed the Jawhara Mall on Monday after setting off a car bomb and launching a suicide attack at its entrance. Iraqi forces later surrounded the building, landing troops on the roof before clashing with attackers inside, killing two gunmen and arresting four. Along with the 18 killed, around 50 people were wounded.

Shortly after the attack, IS posted an online statement saying it targeted an area where many Shiite Muslims are known to gather and warned of "worse" to come. The Associated Press could not immediately verify the authenticity of the statement, but its language and phrasing is consistent with past IS claims of responsibility.

Shortly after the attack, a back-to-back suicide attack targeted a cafe in the town of Muqdadiyah, about 60 miles (90 kilometres) north of Baghdad in Diyala province, killing at least 24 people and wounding 52. And in a crowded area in southeast Baghdad, a car bomb explosion killed at least five people and wounded 12 others.

All police and health officials spoke on condition of anonymity as they were not authorized to talk to the media.

Iraq is going through its worst crisis since the 2011 withdrawal of U.S. troops. In the summer of 2014, the Islamic State group blitzed across large swaths of the country's north and west, capturing Iraq's second-largest city of Mosul and the majority of the western Anbar province.

Last month, the group suffered a major defeat when Iraqi forces drove the extremists out of the western city of Ramadi, the capital of the sprawling Anbar province. Islamic State still controls much of northern and western Iraq.

Baghdad has been almost quiet over the past few months, expect for a few small attacks with bombs and assaults targeting Iraqi forces and government officials.

-----

Associated Press writers Murtada Faraj and Susannah George in Baghdad contributed to this report.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • U.S. envoy accuses Russia of allowing Syria to deny needed aid

    World News CTV News
    U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley is accusing Russia of providing cover for the Syrian regime's use of chemical weapons and its denial of desperately needed aid for hundreds of thousands of besieged people, and is urging international pressure on Moscow "to stop this. Source
  • Front line officers felt 'outgunned,' Moncton massacre trial told

    Canada News CTV News
    MONCTON, N.B. -- A senior RCMP officer says he told superiors he was concerned about the lack of firepower for front line officers long before the 2014 Moncton shooting rampage that left three Mounties dead. Source
  • RCMP dive team to help in search for missing hunters in northern Alberta

    Canada News CTV News
    FORT CHIPEWYAN, Alta. -- A team of scuba divers was being called in Thursday to help in the search for four hunters missing in northeastern Alberta. The Mountie dive team from British Columbia was to arrive in the area north of Fort Chipewyan in the afternoon. Source
  • Quebec tables bill to force police to ditch colourful camo pants protest

    Canada News CTV News
    Quebec Public Security Minister Martin Coiteux has tabled a bill to force municipal police officers to ditch their colourful protest pants. The bill amends the Police Act to obligate police officers and special constables to wear the uniform and equipment provided by their employer. Source
  • Former Quebec cabinet minister Sam Hamad leaving politics

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    QUEBEC — Former Quebec cabinet minister Sam Hamad is leaving politics. Hamad quit cabinet last year amid allegations he helped a horticultural company that was trying to get a government grant. He also resigned his role as Quebec treasury board president but continued to sit as a Liberal member of the legislature. Source
  • Police raid Moscow office of group founded by Putin foe

    World News CTV News
    MOSCOW -- Police raided the Moscow office Thursday of an organization founded by a top foe of President Vladimir Putin that helps opposition candidates and political prisoners. Open Russia said on its website that police arrived at the group's office in early afternoon and were searching it without providing an explanation. Source
  • Firefighter 'a little sore' but in good spirits, day after crane rescue

    Canada News CTV News
    A day after acting Toronto Fire Capt. Rob Wonfor scaled a construction crane in a daring bid to rescue a woman dangling 25 storeys in the air, the firefighter says he’s “a little sore” but in good spirits. Source
  • Maria Sharapova: Controversy sells — fairness does not

    World News CBC News
    As Maria Sharapova returns to tennis after serving a 15-month doping ban for taking meldonium, the world is reminded that all is not fair in sport and sometimes, cheaters will prosper.Eugenie Bouchard blasts 'cheater' Sharapova?Questions surrounding Maria Sharapova's returnSharapova returned to the WTA Wednesday, hours after her doping suspension was lifted. Source
  • Flynn was warned not to accept foreign payments in 2014

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON - Documents released by lawmakers show U.S. President Donald Trump's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, was warned when he retired from the military in 2014 not to take foreign money without "advance approval" by Pentagon authorities. Source
  • U.S. admiral says North Korea crisis is at worst point he's seen

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The senior U.S. Navy officer overseeing military operations in the Pacific said Thursday that the crisis with North Korea is at the worst point he's ever seen, but he declined to compare the situation to the Cuban missile crisis decades ago. Source