Saudi Arabia beheadings soar in 2015, highest in 2 decades

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- Saudi Arabia carried out at least 157 executions in 2015, with beheadings reaching their highest level in the kingdom in two decades, according to several advocacy groups that monitor the death penalty worldwide.

See Full Article

Coinciding with the rise in executions is the number of people executed for non-lethal offences that judges have wide discretion to rule on, particularly for drug-related crimes.

Rights group Amnesty International said in November that at least 63 people had been executed since the start of the year for drug-related offences. That figure made for at least 40 per cent of the total number of executions in 2015, compared to less than four per cent for drug-related executions in 2010. Amnesty said Saudi Arabia had exceeded its highest level of executions since 1995, when 192 executions were recorded.

But while some crimes, such as premeditated murder, may carry fixed punishments under Saudi Arabia's interpretation of the Islamic law, or Shariah, drug-related offences are considered "ta'zir", meaning neither the crime nor the punishment is defined in Islam.

Discretionary judgments for "ta'zir" crimes have led to arbitrary rulings with contentious outcomes.

In a lengthy report issued in August, Amnesty International noted the case of Lafi al-Shammari, a Saudi national with no previous criminal record who was executed in mid-2015 for drug trafficking. The person arrested with him and charged with the same offences received a 10-year prison sentence, despite having prior arrests related to drug trafficking.

Human Rights Watch found that of the first 100 prisoners executed in 2015, 56 had been based on judicial discretion and not for crimes for which Islamic law mandates a specific death penalty punishment.

Shariah scholars hold vastly different views on the application of the death penalty, particularly for cases of "ta'zir."

Delphine Lourtau, research director at Cornell Law School's Death Penalty Worldwide, adds that there are Shariah law experts "whose views are that procedural safeguards surrounding capital punishment are so stringent that they make death penalty almost virtually impossible."

She says in Saudi Arabia, defendants are not provided defence lawyers and in numerous cases of South Asians arrested for drug trafficking, they are not provided translators in court hearings. She said there are also questions "over the degree of influence the executive has on trial outcomes" when it comes to cases where Shiite activists are sentenced to death.

Emory Law professor and Shariah scholar Abdullahi An-Naim said because there is an "inherent infallibility in court systems," no judicial system can claim to enforce an immutable, infallible form of Shariah.

"There is a gap between what Islam is and what Islam is as understood by human beings," he said. "Shariah was never intended to be coercively applied by the state."

Similar to how the U.S. Constitution is seen as a living document with interpretations that have expanded over the years, more so is the Qur'an, which serves as a cornerstone of Shariah, he said. The other half to Shariah is the judgments carried out by the Prophet Muhammad. Virtually anything else becomes an interpretation of Shariah and not Shariah itself, An-Naim said.

Of Islam's four major schools of thought, the underpinning of Saudi Arabia's legal system is based on the most conservative Hanbali branch and an ideology widely known as Wahhabism.

A 2005 royal decree issued in Saudi Arabia to combat narcotics further codified the right of judges to issue execution sentences "as a discretionary penalty" against any person found guilty of smuggling, receiving, or manufacturing drugs.

HRW's Middle East researcher Adam Coolge says Saudi Arabia executed 158 people in total in 2015 compared to 90 the year before.

Catherine Higham, a caseworker for Reprieve, which works against the death penalty worldwide, says her organization documented 157 executions in the kingdom. Saudi Arabia does not release annual tallies, though it does announce individual executions in state media throughout the year.

Saudi law allows for execution in cases of murder, drug offences and rape. Though seldom carried out, the death penalty also applies to adultery, apostasy and witchcraft.

In defence of how Saudi Arabia applies Shariah, the kingdom's representative to the U.N. Human Rights Council, Bandar al-Aiban, said in an address in Geneva in March that capital punishment applies "only (to) those who commit heinous crimes that threaten security."

Because Saudi Arabia carries out most executions through beheading and sometimes in public, it has been compared to the extremist Islamic State group, which also carries out public beheadings and claims to be implementing Shariah.

Saudi Arabia strongly rejects this. In December, Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir told reporters in Paris "it's easy to say Wahhabism equals Daesh equals terrorism, which is not true." Daesh is the Arabic acronym for the IS group.

Unlike the extrajudicial beheadings IS carries out against hostages and others, the kingdom says its judiciary process requires at least 13 judges at three levels of court to rule in favour of a death sentence before it is carried out. Saudi officials also argue executions are aimed at combating crime.

Even with the kingdom's record level of executions in 2015, Amnesty International says China, where information about the death penalty is a "state secret," is believed to execute more individuals that the rest of the world's figures combined.

Reprieve says that in Iran, more than 1,000 people were executed in 2015. Another organization called Iran Human Rights, which is based in Oslo, Norway, and closely follows executions, said at least 648 people had been executed in the first six months of 2015 in the Islamic Republic, with more than two-thirds for drug offences.

Reprieve says Pakistan has executed at least 315 people in 2015, after the country lifted a moratorium on executions early last year following a December 2014 Taliban attack on a school that killed 150 people, most of them children. Only a fraction of those executed since then have been people convicted of a terrorist attack.


Latest Canada & World News

  • Limited gains in first week of Iraq's Mosul offensive

    World News CTV News
    KHAZER, Iraq -- In the week since Iraq launched an operation to retake Mosul from the Islamic State group, its forces have pushed toward the city from the north, east and south, battling the militants in a belt of mostly uninhabited towns and villages. Source
  • Philippines' Duterte sparking distress around the world: U.S.

    World News CTV News
    MANILA, Philippines - The top American diplomat in Asia says Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte's controversial remarks and a "real climate of uncertainty" about his government's intentions have sparked distress in the U.S. and other countries. Source
  • Dennis Oland expected to learn his fate from N.B. Court of Appeal

    Canada News CTV News
    FREDERICTON -- New Brunswick's Court of Appeal is expected to decide today whether Dennis Oland will continue to serve a life sentence for the murder of his father, win acquittal, or face another trial. Defence and Crown lawyers presented their arguments before three justices of the court last week, focused mostly on Oland's incorrect statement to police that he was wearing a navy blazer on the evening his father was murdered. Source
  • Police hunting for 230 escaped drug addicts in Vietnam

    World News Toronto Sun
    HANOI, Vietnam — Vietnamese authorities were searching Monday for 230 drug addicts are still at large after a mass escape from a rehabilitation centre in southern Vietnam. Ho Van Loc, deputy director of labour department in Dong Nai province, said the breakout on Sunday night was started by two inmates and eventually 562 inmates, including 58 women, escaped. Source
  • Female robber shot 12-year-old, two others in Florida: Police

    World News Toronto Sun
    MIAMI — Police are searching for a woman they say shot three people, including a 12-year-old boy in Miami. Authorities say the three victims were walking near a park Saturday night when they were stopped by a car. Source
  • Sailors abducted 4½ years ago by Somali pirates freed

    World News CBC News
    Following more than four years in captivity, 26 Asian sailors held hostage by Somali pirates have been rescued from their captors, China's Foreign Ministry confirmed Monday. The sailors arrived in Nairobi, Kenya, on Sunday, and international mediators said the action the marks a turning point in the long-fought battle against Somali piracy. Source
  • Bill Murray receives Mark Twain Prize, in Bill Murray fashion

    World News CBC News
    Comedian Bill Murray was awarded the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor at a star-studded Kennedy Center ceremony on Sunday in Washington, D.C., with friends and fellow actors praising him for the joy he has brought to audiences worldwide. Source
  • Tropical Storm Seymour forecast to become a hurricane

    World News CTV News
    MIAMI -- Tropical Storm Seymour is strengthening not far from Mexico's coast and forecast to become a hurricane on Monday. The National Hurricane Center said Sunday night that the storm is centred about 370 miles (595 km) south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico, and has maximum sustained winds of 50 mph (80 kph). Source
  • Trump could steal Democratic stronghold as coal miners grow desperate

    World News CTV News
    A long-time Democratic stronghold in the heart of Ohio’s coal country is warming up to GOP nominee Donald Trump. It’s a shift fuelled by the notion that world leaders are putting the mainstay of the region’s economy in their crosshairs with green-energy policy, at a time when the coal industry is grappling with its worst downturn in decades. Source
  • Sailors held by Somali pirates were rescued: China

    World News CTV News
    NAIROBI, Kenya -- Following more than four years in captivity, 26 Asian sailors held hostage by Somali pirates have been rescued from their captors, China's Foreign Ministry confirmed Monday. The sailors arrived in Nairobi, Kenya, on Sunday, and international mediators said the action the marks a turning point in the long-fought battle against Somali piracy. Source