Pope signs off on miracle needed to make Mother Teresa a saint

VATICAN CITY -- Pope Francis has signed off on the miracle needed to make Mother Teresa a saint, giving the nun who cared for the poorest of the poor one of the Catholic Church's highest honours just two decades after her death.

See Full Article

The Vatican said Friday that Francis approved a decree attributing a miracle to Mother Teresa's intercession, during an audience with the head of the Vatican's saint-making office on Thursday, his 79th birthday.

No date was set for the canonization, but Italian media have speculated that the ceremony will take place in the first week of September -- to coincide with the anniversary of her death, and during Francis' Holy Year of Mercy.

Mother Teresa, a Nobel Peace Prize winner, died on Sept. 5, 1997, aged 87. At the time, her Calcutta, India-based Missionaries of Charity order had nearly 4,000 nuns and ran roughly 600 orphanages, soup kitchens, homeless shelters and clinics around the world.

Francis, whose papacy has been dedicated to ministering to the poor just as Mother Teresa did, is a known fan. During his September 2014 visit to Albania, Francis confided to his interpreter that he was not only impressed by her fortitude, but in some ways feared it.

Francis recounted that he had met Mother Teresa when they attended a 1994 bishop synod at the Vatican together. At the time, he was Archbishop Jorge Mario Bergoglio.

"Bergoglio had Mother Teresa behind him, nearby, and he heard her intervene often with great strength, without letting herself in any way be intimidated by this assembly of bishops," the Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, later recounted. "And from that he developed a great esteem for her, as a strong woman, a woman able to give courageous testimony."

But Bergoglio, who has long shown admiration for the women who raised him and taught him, added: "I would have been afraid to have had her as my superior, since she was so tough."

Mother Teresa, born in Macedonia as Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu in 1910, was beatified in 2003 in Rome after the Vatican said an Indian woman's prayers to the nun rid her of an incurable tumour.

The miracle needed for her canonization concerned the inexplicable cure in 2008 of a man in Brazil with multiple brain abscesses who, within a day of being in a coma, was cured, according to a report in Avvenire, the newspaper of the Italian bishops' conference. The Vatican ascertained that his wife's prayers for Mother Teresa's intercession were responsible, the report said.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Wildfire rages close to Yosemite National Park

    World News CBC News
    A blaze burning in foothills west of Yosemite National Park destroyed dozens of structures and forced thousands to flee Gold Rush-era towns but fire crews have been able to stop it from reaching a threatened community on the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Source
  • He's back: Ryan Seacrest to host new American Idol

    World News CBC News
    ABC's American Idol revival is bringing back one of the original stars: Ryan Seacrest. Seacrest confirmed the long rumoured news on his morning show Live with Kelly and Ryan on Thursday after teasing the announcement via social media. Source
  • Police seek to ID man accused of sexually assaulting boy at subway station

    Canada News CTV News
    Toronto police are asking for help in identifying a man they say sexually assaulted a seven-year-old boy at a west-end subway station. Police say a woman reported that her son was sexually assaulted from behind while they were on the escalator at Ossington station Wednesday evening. Source
  • Cop suspended, defence lawyers say video shows drugs planted

    World News CTV News
    BALTIMORE -- A Baltimore officer's police powers have been suspended after defence attorneys released a body camera video that they said shows an officer planting drugs. Police Commissioner Kevin Davis said at a news conference Wednesday that two other officers were put on non-public-contact administrative duty. Source
  • For 1st time, over half of people with HIV taking AIDS drugs

    World News CBC News
    For the first time in the global AIDS epidemic that has spanned four decades and killed 35 million people, more than half of all those infected with HIV are on drugs to treat the virus, the United Nations said in a report released Thursday. Source
  • Western Michigan woman convicted of murder in parrot case

    World News CTV News
    WHITE CLOUD, Mich. - A jury has convicted a western Michigan woman of first-degree murder in the shooting death of her husband in a crime apparently witnessed by the man's pet parrot. The Newaygo County jury deliberated about eight hours before finding 49-year-old Glenna Duram guilty Wednesday of killing 46-year-old Martin Duram. Source
  • Police trying to piece together last hours of 13-year-old B.C. girl found dead in park

    Canada News CTV News
    Investigators are trying to piece together the final hours of Marissa Shen, a 13-year-old girl whose body was found in a park in Burnaby, B.C. Burnaby RCMP are treating the case as a homicide, although they’re still waiting for autopsy results to determine a cause of death. Source
  • Julie Payette's vetting for governor general questioned amid 'disquieting' revelations

    Canada News CBC News
    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is refusing to say what he knew — and when he knew it — about a dismissed, non-felony charge against his choice for Governor General. Julie Payette is calling the six-year-old incident a case of an "unfounded" allegation for which she was "immediately cleared" without any prosecution. Source
  • U.S. hotel, NFL arena may have same flammable panels as Grenfell Towers

    World News Toronto Sun
    In promotional brochures, a U.S. company boasted of the “stunning visual effect” its shimmering aluminum panels created in an NFL stadium, an Alaskan high school and a luxury hotel along Baltimore’s Inner Harbor that “soars 33 stories into the air. Source
  • 10-year-old trips over a 1.2 million-year-old Tusk fossil

    World News Toronto Sun
    LAS CRUCES, N.M. — A boy’s misstep on a family hike in New Mexico has given the world a prehistoric wonder. Ten-year-old Jude Sparks was on a desert hike in Las Cruces in November when he tripped over what turned out to be the fossilized tusk of a 1.2 million-year-old elephant-like creature, called a stegomastodon. Source