North, South Korea end high-level talks with no breakthroughs

SEOUL, Korea, Republic Of -- Two days of high-level talks between North and South Korea ended Saturday with no breakthroughs, South Korean officials said, leaving mixed signals about reconciliation efforts the rivals have made since stepping away from a military standoff in August.

See Full Article

The meeting of vice-ministerial officials in the town of Kaesong was not expected to produce any substantial results, but the talks were still considered a sign that the rivals were working to keep alive an atmosphere of dialogue -- something they've often failed to do in the wake of conflict.

After the talks stretched into the evening on Saturday, as they had done on Friday, they ended without any statement from either side. The countries were also unable to fix a date for a further meeting among senior officials, raising the likelihood of their relations being set back, analysts said.

During the talks, South Korea demanded that the North commit to more reunions between aging family members separated by the 1950-53 Korean War or allow them to communicate through letters, said Hwang Boogi, South Korea's vice minister of unification and head negotiator for the talks.

North Korea, however, maintained that it couldn't further discuss the separated families issue without the South agreeing to restart joint tours to the North's scenic Diamond Mountain resort. The South refused, causing the talks to end, Hwang said.

The Diamond Mountain tours were a valuable source of hard currency for the North before Seoul suspended them in 2008, following the shooting death of a South Korean tourist.

"Our government still maintains its basic stance to cultivate a normal relationship between the South and North, and continue dialogue with North Korea with an open mind," Hwang told reporters.

In their opening statements on Friday, South Korea said the North's nuclear weapons ambitions were an obstacle to better ties. North Korea, meanwhile, said the South should be more cautious when talking about the North's nuclear and human rights issues, Hwang said.

More than 19,700 Koreans have met at the temporary family reunions that have been held irregularly between the rivals since 2000, including nearly 1,000 at the latest meetings at Diamond Mountain in October. None of them has been given a chance to attend a second reunion because the Koreas bar their citizens from visiting each other and exchanging letters and phone calls without special permission.

South Korea has called for more participants and more regular reunions, as thousands of people who had been on the waiting list have already died and many others have entered their 80s and 90s, but the North has refused to oblige.

Analysts say North Korea fears that its citizens will become influenced by the much more affluent South, which could loosen the government's grip on power. The reunions are also considered a coveted North Korean bargaining chip in negotiations with South Korea.

Expectations for the talks on Friday and Saturday dropped last month when, in preparatory negotiations, the sides settled for a meeting at the vice-ministerial level. This likely ruled out meaningful discussions on key issues such as the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

Still, any negotiations between the rivals, who are separated by the world's most heavily armed border, were considered an improvement upon the situation in August, when they threatened each other with war over land mine explosions that maimed two South Korean soldiers.

The standoff eased after marathon talks and an agreement on efforts to reduce animosity. Those included a resumption of talks between senior officials and the round of reunions for war-separated families that were held in October.

Analysts say quick improvements in ties are unlikely because the rivals remain far apart on major issues, including Pyongyang's nuclear weapons ambitions and the broad economic sanctions the South has imposed on the North since 2010, when Seoul blamed a North Korean torpedo for a warship sinking that killed 46 South Koreans.

"It seems that the negotiators thought it was meaningless for them to continue talking when there was such as large gap between their views," said Koh Yu-hwan, a North Korea expert at Dongguk University in Seoul.

The Korean Peninsula remains technically at war, because the Korean War ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty.


Latest Canada & World News

  • Some provincial plans to crack down on distracted driving go too far: lawyer

    Canada News CTV News
    WINNIPEG -- A group that represents defence lawyers says some proposed laws aimed at cracking down on drivers distracted by hand-held electronic devices go too far. Manitoba and Ontario are two provinces planning to let police temporarily suspend the licences of drivers caught using hand-held cellphones and other equipment. Source
  • Dolphin pod trapped by sea ice in Newfoundland

    Canada News CTV News
    A pod of dolphins has become trapped by sea ice near Heart’s Delight-Islington, Newfoundland -- a small town roughly one-and-a-half hour’s drive from St. John’s. “Ice drove them in,” retired local fisherman Charlie Sooley told NTV on Monday. Source
  • Trump calls for death penalty to 'get tough' on drug pushers

    World News CBC News
    Unveiling a long-awaited plan to combat the national scourge of opioid drug addiction, U.S. President Donald Trump called Monday for stiffer penalties for drug traffickers, including the death penalty. "Toughness is the thing that they most fear," Trump said. Source
  • Charles Manson's remains cremated following court battle

    World News CTV News
    LOS ANGELES -- Charles Manson's cremated remains have been scattered nearly four months after the cult leader died in prison. A funeral was held Saturday following a court battle for the 83-year-old's remains. Pastor Mark Pitcher of the Church of the Nazarene in Porterville, California, says 20 to 25 people attended the funeral. Source
  • U.S. woman charged for transporting 6 people into the country near Quebec border

    Canada News CBC News
    A North Carolina woman is facing a charge for transporting people into the United States who didn't have permission to be in the country, according to a complaint filed Monday in federal court in Vermont. The complaint said that just after 2 a.m. Source
  • Judge allows father parenting time despite 'unorthodox beliefs' on white pride

    Canada News CTV News
    HALIFAX -- A Nova Scotia judge has allowed a Halifax-area father unsupervised parenting time with his child, despite the mother's objections over his "unorthodox beliefs" on white pride and other racial matters. In a written decision, Justice Carole Beaton of the provincial Supreme Court's family division said it's in the six-year-old's best interest to have contact with the father. Source
  • U.S. Supreme Court keeps revised Pennsylvania congressional map in place

    World News CBC News
    The U.S. Supreme Court is keeping in place a revised map of Pennsylvania's congressional districts, turning down a request from Republican leaders in the state Legislature. The court's order Monday declining to put on hold the revised map comes as incumbents and potential challengers are circulating petitions to get on the May primary ballot. Source
  • Cirque du Soleil performer killed in fall remembered as 'terrific person'

    Canada News CBC News
    Police in Tampa, Fla., say they have no reason to believe the fall that killed a Cirque du Soleil aerialist Saturday "is anything except a tragic accident," as their investigation into the death of Yann Arnaud continues this week. Source
  • Ontario father who died in Mexico 'had a need to spread love'

    Canada News CTV News
    An Ontario man killed in a motorcycle accident in Mexico is being remembered as a happy, outgoing, big-hearted father of four who had a contagious, booming laugh and did all he could to help others in both countries in which he lived. Source
  • Trump pitches his opioid crisis plan LIVE

    World News CBC News
    The National Today NEWSLETTER: Monday, March 19 Source