Hours to go, climate negotiators 'very close' to clinching global pact

LE BOURGET, France -- Talks on a global pact to fight global warming appeared to make progress late Friday, with some negotiators telling The Associated Press a deal was close.

See Full Article

Negotiators emerged from meetings with French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, the host of the talks, amid an air of optimism that had been lacking just hours earlier.

Fabius was expected to present a new, potentially final draft of the elusive accord Saturday morning at 9 a.m. (0800 GMT).

"We are pretty much there," Egyptian Environment Minister Khaled Fahmy, the chairman of a bloc of African countries, told the AP late Friday. "There have been tremendous developments in the last hours. We are very close."

Negotiators from more than 190 countries in Paris are aiming to create something that's never been done before: an agreement for all countries to reduce man-made emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases and help the poorest adapt to rising seas, fiercer weather and other impacts of global warming.

This accord is the first time all countries are expected to pitch in -- the previous emissions treaty, the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, only included rich countries.

The talks, originally scheduled to end Friday, dragged into an extra day as the French hosts said they needed more time to overcome disputes.

A French official expressed confidence that the draft to be presented Saturday would be the final one. The official was not authorized to speak publicly because the negotiations were ongoing.

Prime Minister Enele Sopoaga of the Pacific island nation of Tuvalu was also upbeat.

"The signals that have come to me give me encouragement that we are going to have a very ... comprehensive and strong agreement in Paris," Sopoaga told the AP.

Liu Zhenmin, deputy chief of the Chinese delegation, was more cautious. Asked by the AP whether the draft would be the final one, he said only if "it's more or less acceptable."

Earlier Friday, Liu stood firm on his nation's demand that rich countries should assume most responsibility for the costs and argued against an agreement that sets too-tough goals for weaning the world off using oil, gas and coal -- the biggest source of carbon emissions.

The U.S. and European countries want to move away from so-called "differentiation" among economies and want big emerging countries like China and India to pitch in more in a final climate deal.

Liu told reporters that issue is "at the core of our concern for the Paris agreement." He said he wants different rules for different countries "clearly stipulated" in the global warming pact.

China is among the more than 180 countries that have submitted emissions targets for the new pact but is resisting Western proposals for robust transparency rules that would require each country to show whether it's on track to meet its target.

Liu also argued against sharply limiting the number of degrees the planet warms this century, because that would involve huge lifestyle and economic changes.

"We need heating. We need air conditioning. You need to drive your car," he said.

Indian Environment Minister Prakash Javadekar also said differentiation was the biggest dispute and accused developed countries of not showing enough flexibility in the talks.

However, signs of divisions among major developing countries surfaced Friday as Brazil joined an informal coalition of Western countries and some developing ones in a "high-ambition coalition" that is calling for a strong deal.

Liu dismissed the coalition as a "performance."

U.S. Secretary of State Kerry, on his fifth straight day in France trying to iron out differences with developing countries, said he's "hopeful" for an accord and has been working behind the scenes to reach compromises.

U.S. climate envoy Todd Stern declined to comment after a meeting with Fabius late Friday.

The talks are the culmination of years of U.N.-led efforts to create a long-term climate deal. U.N. climate conferences often run past their deadlines, given the complexity and sensitivity of each word in an international agreement and the consequences for national economies.

Analysts said the delay until Saturday was not necessarily a bad sign.

"This needs consensus," said Michael Jacobs, an economist with the New Climate Economy project, speaking to reporters. "There's a lot of negotiating to do."

A 27-page draft released Thursday said governments would aim to peak the emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases "as soon as possible" and strive to reach "emissions neutrality" by the second half of the century -- a vague term generally understood to mean no more emissions than the Earth can naturally absorb. That was weaker language than in previous drafts, which included more specific emissions cuts and timeframes.

China's Liu said negotiators don't understand what is meant by "neutrality" and argued for an even softer "low-carbon" goal.

The draft didn't resolve how to deal with demands from vulnerable countries to deal with unavoidable damage from rising seas and other climate impacts. One option said such losses would be addressed in a way that doesn't involve liability and compensation -- a U.S. demand.

Sopoaga, the Tuvalu leader, said he had discussed the issue with Kerry and that he was optimistic that a solution would be found.

Fabius said the world would not find a better moment to reach a global climate deal.

"All the conditions are met to reach a universal, ambitious agreement," he said.


Latest Canada & World News

  • 174 inmates escape, 1 guard shot dead in 'violent' Haitian prison break

    World News CBC News
    Most inmates of a northern Haitian prison escaped on Saturday after killing a guard and stealing firearms, said authorities who launched a manhunt with support from UN peacekeepers for the 174 fugitives. Police set up checkpoints on roads leading from the prison and detained several people without identity cards, a Reuters witness said. Source
  • Slain soldiers to be honoured as part of Remembrance Day, government says ahead of two-year anniversary of Hill attack

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    Conservatives took turns hammering the Liberal government Friday, one accusing them outright of “dishonouring” two slain soldiers by failing to mark Saturday’s second anniversary of the attack on Parliament Hill. York-Simcoe MP Peter Van Loan said during question period in the House of Commons that Oct. Source
  • More than 27,000 Virginians register to vote after extension

    World News CTV News
    RICHMOND, Va. -- The Virginia Department of Elections says more than 27,000 people registered to vote during a brief extension of the state's voter-registration deadline. A federal judge granted the deadline's extension Thursday after heavy demand prevented some voters from registering online. Source
  • Clinton campaign preparing for post-election, even if Trump refuses to concede

    World News CBC News
    Hillary Clinton's campaign is increasingly preparing for the possibility that Donald Trump may never concede the presidential election should she win, a development that could enormously complicate the crucial early weeks of her preparations to take office. Source
  • 100 mostly barefoot inmates escape Haiti lockup: officials

    World News CTV News
    ARCAHAIE, Haiti - Officials say more than 100 mostly barefoot inmates have overpowered guards and escaped from a Haitian prison. Judge Henry Claude Louis-Jean says Saturday's jailbreak occurred in Arcahaie, a coastal town about 30 miles north of Haiti's capital. Source
  • Historical prostitution convictions set aside in appeal of assault case

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    Two men found guilty of assault and prostitution-related charges during the brief window that followed the striking down of Canada’s old prostitution laws — and the introduction of new ones — have had some of their convictions set aside. Source
  • Toddler dies in fire, his dog huddled at his side

    World News Toronto Sun
    SEATTLE — A toddler who died in a house fire was found with his dog and teddy bear next to him and authorities believe the dog tried to protect the boy, a spokesman for Spokane’s fire department said Saturday. Source
  • Toddler dies in Wash. fire with his dog huddled at his side

    World News CTV News
    SEATTLE -- A toddler who died in a house fire was found with his dog and teddy bear next to him and authorities believe the dog tried to protect the boy, a spokesman for Spokane's fire department said Saturday. Source
  • Hacked emails show Clinton campaign weighing Keystone XL decision

    Canada News CBC News
    Hacked emails show Hillary Clinton's campaign wrestled with how to announce her opposition to construction of the Keystone XL pipeline without losing the support of labour unions that supported the project. Emails published this past week by WikiLeaks show debate and confusion within the Clinton camp as it faced down the unexpectedly strong primary challenge by liberal Senator Bernie Sanders, who opposed the pipeline. Source
  • Ottawa man convicted of sexually abusing young girls facing new charges of public nudity, mischief

    Canada News CTV News
    An Ottawa daycare operator convicted last year of sexually abusing young girls in his care is now facing new charges, including public nudity and mischief to property. Jeffrey Wills, 42, was arrested on Thursday at his home in the city’s west end after police received a call about a naked man in the area. Source