Iraqi PM insists Turkish troops withdraw from fighting Islamic State

BAGHDAD -- Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi called for the immediate withdrawal of Turkish troops from northern Iraq in a national address Friday night, insisting no foreign forces are needed to fight the Islamic State group in his country.

See Full Article

Turkey has had troops in northern Iraq to help train local Kurdish and Sunni forces since last year, but the arrival of additional troops last week sparked an uproar in Baghdad. Turkey subsequently halted new deployments but has refused to withdraw its soldiers.

Iraq has already tried to solve the crisis with "peaceful and diplomatic means," Abadi said in the televised address. "We gave our neighbour Turkey a time limit to withdraw its troops and not to close the door to dialogue."

Earlier Friday, Abadi asked the Foreign Ministry to submit a complaint to the United Nations about the presence of Turkish troops near the IS-held city of Mosul.

Abadi asked the UN Security Council to "shoulder its responsibilities" and order the withdrawal of the Turkish troops.

"This is a flagrant violation of the provisions and principles of the UN Charter and in violation of the sanctity of Iraqi territory," a statement from his office said.

U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power, the current council president, said Friday night that the Iraqi ambassador had delivered a letter in Arabic, but it had not yet been translated.

"There's growing alarm from the Iraqi government," Power said. "Any troop deployment must have the consent of the Iraqi government."

Iraq's religious leaders also admonished Turkey during a sermon in Karbala. Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani said Turkey should not have sent "troops to the territory of another state under the pretext of supporting the fight against terrorism" and called on the Iraqi government to "protect the sovereignty of Iraq."

The representative of the cleric, Ahmed al-Safi, relayed al-Sistani's words during a Friday sermon.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Friday that Turkey has no plans to withdraw troops and would continue with the training process "in agreement" with Iraq. He did not elaborate.

Erdogan defended Turkey's move to send more troops, saying IS and other terror groups were "running wild" and Baghdad was unable to protect Turkish soldiers there.

"Are we to wait for the invitation of the central Iraqi government when there is an attack to our country? We have no such luxury," Erdogan said.

Earlier, a government statement said Turkish intelligence chief Hakan Fidan and Foreign Ministry Undersecretary Feridun Sinirlioglu met with Iraqi officials in Baghdad and the sides agreed to work toward forming "new mechanisms" to deepen co-operation in security.

Associated Press writers Suzan Frazer in Ankara, Susannah George in Baghdad and Edith M. Lederer at the United Nations contributed to this report.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Decades-long mystery of Second World War helmet finally solved

    Canada News CTV News
    A mysterious Second World War helmet lost for decades has finally been returned to its rightful owners, thanks to some sleuthing and luck online. The Di Cecco family first discovered the helmet when they moved into a Toronto-area home in the 1960s. Source
  • Canada's 150 year ends on ice, but no hockey pucks, triple jumps allowed

    Canada News CTV News
    OTTAWA -- No figure skating. No hockey. No racing. No cell phones. But other than that have fun kids! Canadian Heritage Wednesday unveiled the details of the Canada 150 Ice Rink currently being built on the east lawn of Parliament Hill. Source
  • Regina man accused of smuggling Nigerians across Canada-U.S. border

    Canada News CTV News
    SASKATOON -- A man who pleaded guilty in the United States for his part in a human smuggling operation has been arrested and charged in Canada. RCMP say Victor Omoruyi of Regina was picked up at the Saskatoon International Airport on Tuesday. Source
  • Canada's largest school board votes to end armed police presence in schools

    Canada News CBC News
    Canada's largest school board has voted to end a controversial program that places uniformed police officers in dozens of public schools across Toronto. Toronto District School Board (TDSB) trustees voted 18-3 in favour of cancelling the School Resource Officer (SRO) program during a meeting on Wednesday night. Source
  • Sexual attacks against Rohingya may be war crimes: UN envoy

    World News CTV News
    Widespread atrocities against Rohingya Muslim women and girls have been orchestrated and perpetrated by Myanmar's military and may amount to war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide, the U.N. envoy on sexual violence in conflict said Wednesday. Source
  • Report: 2 women claim Franken touched them inappropriately

    World News CTV News
    MINNEAPOLIS - Two women are alleging that Minnesota Democratic U.S. Sen. Al Franken touched their buttocks during events for his first campaign for Senate. The women spoke to Huffington Post on condition of anonymity. Source
  • 12 of 14 Hurricane Irma nursing home deaths ruled homicides

    World News CBC News
    Authorities say the deaths of 12 of the 14 Florida nursing home patients who died after Hurricane Irma have been ruled homicides. The Sun Sentinel reports that autopsy results from the Broward County medical examiner's office were released Wednesday. Source
  • Daily public transit use could pose hearing loss risk: study

    Canada News CTV News
    Daily use of public transit might cause hearing loss. It’s a conclusion anyone who’s taken Toronto rail transit might reach after one ride, but researchers from the University of Toronto now have data to suggest it may be true. Source
  • 'I would draw the line:' Sask. premier candidate opposes abortion for rape victims

    Canada News CTV News
    REGINA -- One of the leading candidates in the race to become the next premier of Saskatchewan says he doesn't believe in abortion, even in the case of sex assault victims. Ken Cheveldayoff, a long-time Saskatoon member of the legislature for the Saskatchewan Party, also says anyone under 18 should need parental consent for the procedure. Source
  • Russia says expert body on Syria chemical attacks 'is dead'

    World News CTV News
    Russia's U.N. ambassador said Wednesday the expert body that has determined responsibility for chemical weapons attacks in Syria "is dead" -- but Moscow is ready to discuss "a new mechanism." Vassily Nebenzia told reporters after a closed Security Council discussion that the Joint Investigative Mechanism, or JIM, "has discredited itself completely. Source