Trump's Muslim policy wins over GOP voters, disappoints Americans: poll

WASHINGTON -- A winner amongst Republicans and a big loser with the general public: that's the net effect of Donald Trump's controversial plan for a ban on Muslim travel.

See Full Article

A new poll suggests a plurality of Republicans favour it, but not the broader American population, in a finding that could hold significance for the 2016 election.

The NBC-Wall Street Journal survey suggests 25 per cent of Americans support the idea, 57 per cent oppose it and 18 per cent are not sure about a policy that has prompted a torrent of international condemnation.

But in one crucial detail, which is relevant to the fast-approaching process of picking presidential candidates, it appears the policy might not hurt his standing with Republican voters.

On the contrary: The survey said 42 per cent of self-identified Republicans expressed support for the idea, 36 per cent opposed it and 22 per cent weren't sure.

"It does indicate Trump has limited potential in a general election," said Fred Yang, a Democratic pollster who presented the survey on NBC with a Republican colleague, Micah Roberts.

The question on Trump's Muslim proposal was asked Dec. 8-9 of 495 respondents and result has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.4 percentage points.

It appears a sense of panic has begun setting in within the Republican brass over the prospect of Trump winning the nomination, as he continues to lead intra-party surveys with less than two months before primaries begin.

The Washington Post reported Thursday that senior figures within the party have begun planning the possibility of their first brokered convention since 1976.

The newspaper said about 20 of them gathered this week at a Washington restaurant where they discussed the mechanics of an old-school convention, where party delegates would coalesce around a winner.

In that last brokered convention, the establishment rallied around incumbent president Gerald Ford to block then-insurgent Ronald Reagan.

Trump told the paper that such a process would hurt him.

"I'll be disadvantaged," Trump told the Post. "My disadvantage is that I'd be going up against guys who grew up with each other, who know each other intimately and I don't know who they are, okay?... These kind of guys stay close. They all know each other. They want each other to win."

Trump has mused about another threat sure to send chills down Republican spines: the possibility of mounting a third-party candidacy, should he feel that he's been treated unfairly.

He floated the idea, then signed a pledge ruling it out and began raising it again this week when numerous party elders lambasted his idea of religious controls at the border.

Trump still has a few months to make up his mind, said a leading expert on laws for third-party challenges.

"It takes time to complete petitions," said Richard Winger, who runs the website Ballot Access News, which chronicles the various hurdles to independent candidacies that the two established parties have set up in various states.

"Trump would need to decide in March, if he wanted to be on in all states. But... (John B.) Anderson got on in all 50 (states in 1980) and he didn't start until April 24."

A Trump third-party bid could prove devastating to Republicans. Polls suggest many Republican voters would stick with him, with the split benefiting Democrats.

As for the details of his Muslim policy, they keep changing. He's described it as a temporary ban on Muslim travel to the U.S., but has changed his story several times about who might come under it.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Liberals hold on to honeymoon gains in national polls

    Canada News CBC News
    Justin Trudeau's Liberals continue to enjoy more support today than they did in the 2015 federal election and have yet to see their poll numbers take a negative turn. But as the government enters the second year of its four-year mandate, it's making decisions that have the potential to disappoint some of its new supporters. Source
  • Millions of vehicles with potentially dangerous recalls still on road

    Canada News CBC News
    Millions of vehicles in Canada, an estimated one in six, have an outstanding safety recall, and auto industry experts say not enough is being done to fix them. These include cars with safety defects that may result in crashes, injury or death, according to the manufacturers. Source
  • 'Danger Report': Real estate pros fret court could break lock on secret sales data

    Canada News CBC News
    There's little doubt Canada's real estate industry feels under siege these days. Just check out the recent Danger Report commissioned by the Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA), which analyzes "negative game changers emerging in real estate. Source
  • The architects of Ontario's energy disaster are in the PMO. Be afraid

    Canada News CBC News
    It is uncontroversial to call Ontario's energy situation a disaster. As Premier Kathleen Wynne has herself conceded: Ontarians are now having to "choose between paying the electricity bill and buying food or paying rent." Wynne's polling numbers suggest that most Ontarians know where to square the blame, with a pitiful 15 per cent approval rating and the 58 per cent of the electorate believing she should resign. Source
  • 'Shocking waste': Federal government spent more than $400K to renovate new office building

    Canada News CBC News
    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government spent more than $416,000 to renovate a two-year-old office building in downtown Ottawa, including paying more than $5,000 for 56 coat hooks. Among the taxpayer-funded renovations carried out to the 17-floor Elgin Street office tower since the Liberal government came to power: $52,413 to build a bike storage room; $59,451 for new furniture; and $3,426 to "modify the lighting to an existing quiet room" by installing a window film and a dimmer…
  • Kurdish authorities defend detention of Canadian Michael Kennedy

    World News CBC News
    Michael Kennedy's decision to travel to Syria with Kurdish forces ultimately got him into trouble with authorities in Iraq and contributed to his extended detention, says a senior official in the Kurdish regional government. The former Canadian soldier has now been released after almost a week in custody, but his story is a dramatic illustration of how severe both the Iraqis and Kurdish officials have become about border security. Source
  • Impartial adviser to address trial involving B.C. polygamous community

    Canada News CTV News
    CALGARY - A lawyer appointed to act as an impartial adviser is expected to make brief closing submissions today in the trial for three people connected to a British Columbia polygamous community. Brandon Blackmore, Gail Blackmore and James Oler are accused of removing girls, aged 13 and 15, from Canada for a sexual purpose. Source
  • Survivor recalls fear, anger on day of Pearl Harbor attack

    World News CTV News
    PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii -- Surprise, fear, anger and pride overcame Jim Downing as Japanese planes bombed Pearl Harbor. Then a newlywed sailor, he recalled a Japanese plane flying low and slow in his direction as he rushed to his battleship from his home after hearing explosions and learning of the attack on the radio. Source
  • Syrian forces close to capturing Aleppo's old city, force rebels to withdraw

    World News CBC News
    Syria's state media and an opposition monitoring group say that Syrian troops and their allies have captured more ground in Aleppo's Old City, gaining a new hold in the heart of the divided city. The state SANA news agency says that the Syrian forces in the early hours of Wednesday morning established control over two districts north of the ancient Citadel in the heart of the city — the Aghiour and Bab al-Hadid neighbourhoods. Source
  • Mistrial in 'open and shut' police shooting stuns South Carolina

    World News CTV News
    COLUMBIA, S.C. - In the video, an unarmed black man runs away as a white police officer shoots him repeatedly in the back. But a lone holdout on a South Carolina jury forced a mistrial. Source