The 'eHarmony of real estate’ helps home buyers find perfect match

One Edmonton realtor is hoping to change the way local residents find their perfect home by looking to the online dating world.

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Elisse Moreno recently launched what she calls the "eHarmony of real estate" the free online tool called Home Tribe Match.

The app asks potential home buyers a series of questions before matching them up with what could be their perfect home.

Users are asked a series of questions that go well beyond their budget and the number of bedrooms and bathrooms they're looking for.

The application asks users about their ideal commute, what locations they'd like to be close to, how much they worry about crime and violence and if they'd like to live in a neighbourhood with other residents of similar ethnicities, among other questions.

"To me a house and the community is more than just a home. It's not just about the physical features,” Moreno told CTV Edmonton. "It's actually about where can my kids go to school, where can I walk my dog."

According to Moreno, a team of developers and data scientists analyzed "thousands" of data sets about the city of Edmonton and spent months looking at housing trends in the area, before devising a series of questions to help guide the home-buying process.

Edmonton resident Coral Ashmore said when she was looking for a new home, safety was one of her top priorities.

"I wanted something to call my own where I felt comfortable and safe, and I knew my neighbourhood," she said.

Ashmore said the Home Tribe Match app recommended "tons" of matches. She ended up purchasing a home that was among the top 10 matches.

Moreno said she'd like to see more transparency in the real estate industry, and she noted that Home Tribe Match is "just the beginning."

"The more we can inform people on the process of buying or selling, the better," she said.

With a report from CTV Edmonton


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