Energy East hearings interrupted in Quebec by protesters

Quebec’s provincial hearings into the Energy East pipeline proposal began Monday, after being delayed about 15 minutes by singing and chanting protesters who say the project would be bad for the environment.

See Full Article

Energy East would bring a million barrels per day of crude oil from Alberta and Saskatchewan through an existing pipeline to Montreal, and on to a refinery in Saint John, N.B., through 650 kilometres of new pipe.

TransCanada, the company behind the $15.7-billion project, argued that its plan is much safer and more environmentally friendly than the alternative: transporting oil by rail.

Louis Bergeron, Energy East's vice-president for New Brunswick and Quebec, also said the project “will bring a major reduction of foreign imports of oil into refineries in Eastern Canada,” including those in Quebec.

Conservative MP Gerard Deltell made similar arguments on his Facebook page, where wrote that there are already approximately 2,000 km of pipelines already in Quebec, including nine that cross the St. Lawrence River.

“Did we ever see a black tide?” he wrote in French, while pointing out that one of the pipelines dates all the way back to 1941.

Deltell pointed out that the oil Quebec currently uses often comes by boat from foreign countries. “Why send our billions of dollars overseas when they could stay here in Canada?” he wrote, adding that the project will create 3,000 jobs in Quebec alone.

Among those who have stood against the pipeline is Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre, who has said he has concerns about the cost of an oil spill.

Coderre said the pipeline company needs to “redo their homework.”

Coderre and Quebec’s Liberal government have faced anger from those who say they are interfering with federal jurisdiction.

Quebec has promised that the hearings will look at both environmental and economic impacts.

They are expected to wrap up in November.

With a report from CTV News national correspondent Genevieve Beauchemin



Advertisements

Latest Economic News

  • Australia complains to WTO about Canadian rules on selling wine

    Economic CBC News
    Australia has complained at the World Trade Organization about the rules applied to the sale of wine by Canada and various Canadian provinces, a WTO filing showed on Tuesday. "It appears that a range of distribution, licensing and sales measures such as product markups, market access and listing policies, as well as duties and taxes on wine applied at the federal and provincial level may discriminate, either directly or indirectly, against imported wine," Australia said. Source
  • 'Twice the headache': Why it's getting harder for Canadians to enter U.S.

    Economic CTV News
    Amid negotiations over possible changes to the North American Free Trade Agreement, an immigration lawyer says it’s becoming more difficult for Canadians to cross the U.S. border for work. In 2016, more than 1.1 million Canadians were granted temporary visas to work in the United States. Source
  • N.S. gives payroll rebates to Ernst and Young for new 'centre of excellence'

    Economic CTV News
    HALIFAX - The Nova Scotia government has awarded payroll rebates to Ernst and Young as the professional services firm establishes its first Canadian-based Global Centre of Excellence for Robotic Process Automation Service in Halifax. Nova Scotia Business Inc. Source
  • General Motors sees sustained profits through 2018

    Economic CBC News
    General Motors will take a $7 billion US write-down in 2017 tied to the U.S. tax overhaul, but expects strong sales in North America and China to sustain its profit through 2018. The Detroit automaker on Tuesday reaffirmed its 2017 expectations for profit between $6 and $6.50 per share and said it expects similar results in 2018. Source
  • Founder of Canada Jetlines takes helm as CEO of rival Flair Airlines

    Economic CTV News
    KELOWNA, B.C. -- The founder of Canada Jetlines is taking over as chief executive of Canadian discount carrier Flair Airlines Ltd. Jim Scott replaces Flair founder and former president Jim Rogers, who will remain an adviser until 2019 after selling his shares in the Kelowna-based company. Source
  • Davos organizers: Trump to make last-day address at forum

    Economic CTV News
    GENEVA -- U.S. President Donald Trump will deliver the closing address at the elite World Economic Forum conference in Davos next week, which focuses on "finding ways to reaffirm international co-operation on crucial shared interests," forum organizers announced Tuesday. Source
  • Bitcoin prices drop on news South Korea still considering crackdown

    Economic CBC News
    Prices of bitcoin and other digital currencies have skidded after South Korea's top financial policymaker said Tuesday that a crackdown on trading of cryptocurrencies was still possible. Finance Minister Kim Dong-yeon said in an interview with Seoul radio station TBS that banning trading in digital currencies was "a live option. Source
  • Small and medium-sized businesses to up investment spend 3% this year: BDC

    Economic CTV News
    MONTREAL -- A new report by the Business Development Bank of Canada says small and mid-sized businesses in Canada are expected to increase their investments by three per cent this year to $140.5 billion. Source
  • Yellow Pages Ltd. cutting 18 per cent of employees, roughly 500 jobs

    Economic CTV News
    MONTREAL -- Yellow Pages Ltd. announced a plan to cut roughly 500 jobs on Tuesday in an effort to reduce spending and improve its results. The company (TSX:Y) said the job losses will amount to close to 18 per cent of its employees. Source
  • Yellow Pages Ltd. cuts another 500 jobs as it struggles with digital shift

    Economic CTV News
    MONTREAL -- Yellow Pages Ltd. has cut another 500 jobs across the country as it continues to struggle with a shift of consumer preferences from print to digital directories. The company (TSX:Y) said Tuesday the job losses, which took effect Tuesday, amount to close to 18 per cent of its employees. Source