5 things to know about aviation emissions as Ottawa eyes Bombardier bail-out

OTTAWA -- Last week in Montreal, the United Nations' International Civil Aviation Organization proposed new greenhouse gas emission standards for aircraft.

See Full Article

Here's five things to know about the proposal:

1. It's the first time that binding efficiency standards have been imposed internationally on aircraft. The negotiated proposal must still be adopted by the civil aviation councils of 36 member states.

2. The standards would require an average four per cent reduction in fuel consumption at cruising altitudes for airliners and cargo planes compared to new planes built in 2015.

3. All new aircraft designs would have to meet the standard starting in 2020, as would any designs in actual production by 2023. All planes manufactured after 2028 would have to comply with the new standards, but older aircraft in service would not be phased out or have to comply with the new emissions standards.

4. Putting limits on aviation emissions, which comprise about two per cent of the global total but are forecast to triple, has been a priority of U.S. President Barack Obama. The White House says the new standards should cut carbon emissions by about 590 tonnes from 2020 and 2040, equivalent to taking more than 140 million cars off the road for a year.

5. The regulations on emissions are to be followed by a second set of rules under negotiation by the ICAO that would establish market-based incentives, such as carbon levies, for further emission reductions by airlines. The second phase is supposed to be completed later in 2016.



Advertisements

Latest Economic News

  • Wind company owed $28M by federal government asks court to force payment

    Economic CTV News
    TORONTO -- A wind power company is going to court to try to get $28 million it is owed by the federal government over an Ontario offshore wind moratorium. Windstream Energy had a 300-megawatt project planned for an offshore wind project in eastern Ontario when the provincial government abruptly enacted the moratorium in February 2011. Source
  • Asian stocks drift higher as investors await Fed minutes

    Economic CTV News
    SEOUL, Korea, Republic Of -- Asian stock markets were mixed with subdued movements on Wednesday, getting little push from Wall Street's record high overnight, as investors awaited the Fed's latest meeting minutes due later in the day for clues about the U.S. Source
  • U.S. shutting down Dakota Access oil pipeline protest camp

    Economic CTV News
    BISMARCK, N.D. -- The Army Corps of Engineers' plan to close a Dakota Access pipeline protest camp that's been around for more than six months isn't likely to be the demise of on-the-ground opposition in North Dakota. Source
  • CRA's new fingerprinting policy could create travel problems for accused tax evaders

    Economic CBC News
    The Canada Revenue Agency has begun to record the fingerprints of every person charged with tax evasion, a move that could severely restrict foreign travel for anyone accused but not necessarily convicted of a criminal tax offence. Source
  • Alberta Energy Regulator names companies falling behind on pipeline safety

    Economic CTV News
    CALGARY - The Alberta Energy Regulator is making it easier for the public to see which oil and gas companies are falling behind on pipeline safety. The regulator launched a new pipeline reporting website Tuesday that lays out several pipeline safety ratings for all operators in the province over the past two years. Source
  • Wal-Mart keeps working to make inroads against Amazon

    Economic CTV News
    NEW YORK -- The nation's largest retailer keeps working to make headway against the largest online seller. Wal-Mart drew more shoppers to its namesake stores in the United States and its online sales soared 29 per cent in the fourth quarter, which covers the critical holiday shopping season. Source
  • Verizon forces Yahoo to cut sale price over hacking scandal

    Economic Toronto Sun
    SAN FRANCISCO — Yahoo is taking a $350 million hit on its previously announced $4.8 billion sale to Verizon in a concession for security lapses that exposed personal information stored in more than 1 billion Yahoo user accounts. Source
  • Seven-year-old girl's job application to Google catches CEO's eye

    Economic CTV News
    For seven-year-old Chloe Bridgewater, it’s never too early to get started on building your career. The girl from Hereford, U.K. penned a job application to Google CEO Sundar Pichai after seeing images of Google offices outfitted with bean bag chairs, go karts and slides. Source
  • French leftist lawmakers take EU-Canada free trade deal to court

    Economic CBC News
    More than 100 French left-wing lawmakers decided on Tuesday to appeal to the country's Constitutional Council to block a contentious free trade deal between the European Union and Canada. Supporters of the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) say it will boost economic growth and jobs on both sides of the Atlantic. Source
  • Feds may face 'rough' NAFTA renegotiation: former PM Mulroney

    Economic CTV News
    TORONTO - Former prime minister Brian Mulroney says the federal government may face a "rough negotiation" when it comes to NAFTA, but he believes Canada will nonetheless emerge with strong ties to the U.S. and Mexico. Source