Canada to require bus and truck drivers to log hours electronically

MONTREAL - After years of study, the federal government says it will implement new safety regulations in two years that are aligned with U.S.

See Full Article

efforts to tackle fatigue among truck and bus drivers.

Drivers will be required to electronically record their hours on the road, says Transport Canada, marking a change from the mandatory paper logs that have been in use since the 1930s.

The regulations would cover cross-border and interprovincial travel and should be in place when similar rules in the U.S. come into force in late 2017, Transport Canada says.

The changes will be "operationally feasible for the industry" and aligned as much as possible with provinces and the U.S., said Transport Canada spokeswoman Natasha Gauthier.

"The technical specifications and standards for electronic logging device (ELD) technology may differ slightly between the U.S. and Canada, but should not be necessarily inconsistent," she wrote in an email.

In making the changes, the Liberal government is following through on a commitment made last year by former transport minister Lisa Raitt. But the Conservatives did not set a timeline.

Industry players have been frustrated by how long it has taken Ottawa to change the regulations.

"We have been talking about this for 10 years," said Motor Coach Canada CEO Doug Switzer.

"Ironically, the industry would like to see regulations on these kinds of things and it's the government that is dragging their feet on it."

Once implemented, commercial truck and bus drivers will be required to record their hours behind the wheel with devices that automatically record driving time by monitoring engine hours, vehicle movement, kilometres driven and location information.

The devices are estimated by the U.S. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration to annually save US$1 billion in administrative costs, about 26 lives and prevent 562 injuries. Similar Canadian figures weren't available.

The units also make it easier for provincial officials monitoring compliance and should address concerns that handwritten forms could be doctored.

The Canadian Trucking Alliance says the move towards electronic logs will bring the industry into the 21st century.

"Our industry shares its workplace with the public more than any of the other mode of transportation, yet the enforcement community is relying upon an archaic, outdated way of monitoring and enforcing what is arguably the most important safety rule," said president David Bradley.

The devices, which cost an average of a couple of thousand dollars depending on type of unit, track hours on the road and rest periods to help companies to better manage their fleet.

Truckers and bus drivers can be behind the wheel for up to 13 hours in a day but must be off-duty for 10 hours, eight of which must be consecutive.

Bradley said about half of Canadian trucks have or are in the process of installing electronic devices.

TransForce, one of North America's largest trucking companies, said the devices are already installed in all of its big fleets in the U.S.

"It's just the small guys that are not ready yet but they will have to get ready for the end of 2017," CEO Alain Bedard told analysts during a conference call Friday.

There is general acceptance among drivers, even though privacy concerns have been raised because the electronic devices allow companies to track their every move, says Leo Laliberte, assistant director of the freight division of Teamsters Canada, which represents about 25,000 truckers in the country.

In addition to reducing fatigue, the devices and anti-harassment provisions in U.S. regulations protect workers from being forced by companies facing driver shortages to work longer hours, he said.

Laliberte said the regulations in Canada should take into account the country's unique challenges, including longer travel distances and fewer rest stops compared to the U.S.

"In Canada, you've got to plan like five hours ahead to make sure that you'll be at a truck stop when your machine is going to tell you you won't have any more hours," he said.

Joanne Ritchie, executive director of the Owner-Operator's Business Association of Canada, said small fleet owners also aren't opposed to the adoption of new technology but favour a voluntary system that includes incentives.



Advertisements

Latest Economic News

  • Bogus bongs or bogus lawsuits? Pipe maker sues over fakes

    Economic CTV News
    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Don't want to bum your buzz, but that expensive bong you got cheap to smoke your pot may be bogus. High-end German glass water pipe maker Roor and its American licensee are filing lawsuits against smoke shops and mom-and-pop convenience stores in Florida, California and New York. Source
  • 'There isn't a best card out there': How to choose a credit card that works for you

    Economic CBC News
    Credit cards are sometimes lambasted as high-cost consumer debt that can quickly get borrowers into trouble. But if you pay off the balance each month, credit cards can also have significant perks. Loyalty programs like Air Miles, which has both a standalone program and partnerships with credit cards, have drawn a lot of criticism lately, but Canadians are still attached to credit cards that offer rewards. Source
  • Chevron says it has won the latest round in an Ecuadorian legal battle

    Economic CTV News
    Oil giant Chevron Corp. says it has won a round in the Canadian courts in a complex legal battle with a group of Ecuadorian villagers who are trying to collect on a massive judgement they won in Ecuador's courts. Source
  • Liberals ask President Trump to approve Keystone XL pipeline

    Economic CTV News
    Canada’s natural resources minister says that he hopes the new U.S. administration will allow the Keystone XL pipeline quashed by Barack Obama to proceed, noting that all Canadian regulatory approvals are in place. Jim Carr spoke to CTV’s Power Play from Washington, D.C. Source
  • Apple depicts Qualcomm as a shady monopolist in US$1B lawsuit

    Economic CTV News
    SAN FRANCISCO -- Apple is suing mobile chip maker Qualcomm for $1 billion in a patent fight pitting the iPhone maker against one of its major suppliers. The 100-page complaint filed Friday in a San Diego federal court depicts Qualcomm as a greedy monopolist abusing its power in a key segment of the mobile chip market to extort royalties for iPhone innovations that have nothing to do with Qualcomm's technology. Source
  • Trump's 'America first' tone worries head of Canadian oil and gas industry group

    Economic CTV News
    Trump takes charge: Sworn in as 45th president of the U.S.A. Source
  • Obama administration urges Canada to reverse Super Bowl ad decision

    Economic CTV News
    OTTAWA - In one of its final communications with Canada, the outgoing Obama administration is engaging in pigskin politics: asking the Trudeau government to overturn a regulation affecting ads during the Super Bowl. The U.S. Source
  • Oil and stock prices higher as Donald Trump sworn in

    Economic CBC News
    Stock markets responded to the first day of the Trump Administration in a largely positive way, with the Dow Jones, the Nasdaq and the S&P 500 all higher on the day of his swearing in. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up by nearly 100 points to 19,829 just minutes before the new president formally acceded to the position. Source
  • Stocks higher as Donald Trump lays out glimpse of future economic policies

    Economic CBC News
    Stock markets responded to the first day of the Trump Administration in a largely positive way, with the Dow Jones, the Nasdaq and the S&P 500 all higher on the day of his swearing in. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up by nearly 100 points to 19,829 just minutes before the new president formally acceded to the position. Source
  • Stocks close higher as Donald Trump lays out glimpse of future economic policies

    Economic CBC News
    Stock markets responded to the first day of the Trump Administration in a largely positive way, with the Dow Jones, the Nasdaq and the S&P 500 all higher on the day of his swearing in. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up by nearly 100 points to 19,829 just minutes before the new president formally acceded to the position. Source