Concerns raised over LNG proposal over predicted greenhouse gas emissions

VANCOUVER -- Canada's environmental review body says greenhouse gas emissions from a proposed liquefied natural gas facility on British Columbia's north coast pose a significant ecological threat.

See Full Article

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency released its draft environmental assessment report on Wednesday for Pacific NorthWest LNG's planned $3.6-billion export terminal on Lelu Island, south of Prince Rupert.

The report found the project alone would produce 5.28 million tonnes of carbon dioxide annually, while upstream activities would contribute an additional 6.5 million to 8.7 million tonnes. Those levels represent an overall increase in provincial emissions of 8.5 per cent and between 10 and 14 per cent respectively, the document concludes.

"The upstream greenhouse gas emissions ... can be characterized similarly to the direct emissions: high in magnitude, continuous, irreversible and global in extent," reads the report.

Clark has long trumpeted B.C.'s potential to develop the cleanest LNG on the planet, lauding the proposed industry as a worldwide pollution fighter that will replace dirty coal with cleaner-burning natural gas in countries such as China.

Canada's review agency is soliciting public feedback before submitting its draft assessment to the federal government. Cabinet is expected to decide whether to approve the project by the end of March.

In November 2014, B.C. issued an environmental review certificate for Pacific NorthWest's initiative, which is backed by Malaysia's state-owned energy giant Petronas.

Provincial Energy Minister Rich Coleman praised the report because it shows fish habitat isn't at risk, adding he's already received feedback from First Nations who say the document has changed their perception of the project.

Speaking to reporters in Victoria, he said the province is working to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in other areas, which has been relayed to the federal government.

"So when I met with the minister last week in Ottawa I just reminded him that if you're going to look at our standards in (greenhouse gas) give us credit for what we're already doing," Coleman added.

The Lax Kw'alaams First Nation has been outspoken in its opposition to the proposal. A spokeswoman said its members were still reviewing the draft review before commenting publicly.

Royal Dutch Shell announced earlier this month it was postponing its final decision on whether to invest in the coastal mega-project amidst plummeting global energy prices.

Pacific NorthWest LNG spokesman Spencer Sproule thanked the federal government in a statement and said the company would review the draft report.

"PNW LNG is committed to building and operating a world-class LNG facility in an environmentally sustainable manner that First Nations and residents in the region can be proud of," Sproule wrote.

The project's main sticking point up until now has been over its possible impact on the area's salmon population, with some aboriginal groups in the region voicing strong protest.

The Skeena Watershed Conservation Coalition expressed its disappointment with the review, adding that the "incredibly superficial" report omitted key, peer-reviewed science.

"Given the scientifically established importance of Flora Bank to Skeena salmon, to say that this project will not have significant adverse impacts on salmon is completely incorrect and shows us once again that the CEAA process is broken," said Greg Horne in a statement.

The facility would be located at the mouth of the Skeena River, which is considered vital to the ecosystem of B.C.'s second-largest salmon-bearing waterway.

But the federal review concluded that by taking appropriate mitigation measures, the construction and operation of the facility wouldn't significantly affect either marine or freshwater fish habitat.

Besides emissions levels, the only other significant concern raised in the report was the potential impact on harbour porpoise.



Advertisements

Latest Economic News

  • Keystone spill clean up underway in South Dakota as pipeline vote looms

    Economic CTV News
    CALGARY -- TransCanada Corp. said Friday that work is well underway to clean up a sizable oil leak at its Keystone pipeline in South Dakota that occurred days before a vote on the fate of the company's flagship pipeline proposal. Source
  • Volkswagen accelerates push into electric cars with big spending plan

    Economic CBC News
    Volkswagen approved a 34-billion-euro ($51 billion Cdn) spending plan on Friday that accelerates its efforts to become a global leader in electric cars. The world's largest carmaker by unit sales will spend the money on electric cars, autonomous driving and new mobility services by the end of 2022, it said after a meeting of its supervisory board. Source
  • Walmart, J.B. Hunt truck operations sign up for Tesla's all-electric Semi

    Economic CBC News
    Walmart is planning to test Tesla's electric trucks in Canada and the U.S., it said Friday, just a day after the unveiling of the all-electric Tesla Semi. The retail giant becomes the second U.S. company to commit to trying the new technology as an alternative to diesel, after J.B. Source
  • Quebec biofuel company partners with Qantas in effort to cut emissions

    Economic CBC News
    A Quebec biofuels company has signed its first deal to power an airline's jets with energy grown from Canadian oilseeds. Agrisoma Biosciences Inc. of Gatineau will supply biofuel to Australia's Qantas Airways made from Carinata seed, a non-food, industrial type of mustard seed that produces oil suitable for aviation and diesel fuel. Source
  • Bombardier to hire 1000 workers in Montreal for Global 7000 business jet

    Economic CTV News
    Bombardier confirmed this morning that it will hire about 1,000 workers over the next 18 months for its new Global 7000 business jet. The workers will complete the interiors for the company's largest business aircraft. Source
  • Bombardier hiring 1,000 to work on Global 7000 aircraft

    Economic CBC News
    Bombardier is hiring about 1,000 workers in the Montreal area to work on its Global 7000 business aircraft program, the company said Friday. The company said the workers will be hired over the next 18 months for interior completion work on the aircraft. Source
  • Teck outlines plan to spend nearly $500 million on dividends, stock buybacks

    Economic CTV News
    VANCOUVER -- Teck Resources has announced plans to issue a special dividend to its shareholders, in addition to its regular dividend, and increase its share buyback program by $230 million. The diversified mining company, based in Vancouver, says the two measures are being taken because of Teck's strong cash position. Source
  • Why aren't drivers catching a break at the pumps?

    Economic CTV News
    There may be no fact of life more confounding to ordinary Canadians than gas prices. They seem to go up at the first whisper of climbing oil prices, but don’t fall nearly as fast when barrels of oil sell for less. Source
  • Thousands more names and companies revealed from Paradise Papers

    Economic CBC News
    The public will get a glimpse at the tens of thousands of names — including those of more than 3,000 Canadians and Canadian companies — in the Paradise Papers starting today. Key information from the huge leak of tax-haven financial records, including the names of offshore companies and the people behind them, is being made public by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), the Washington-based group that co-ordinated global reporting on the documents. Source
  • Bombardier announcement LIVE

    Economic CBC News
    Air Date: Nov 17, 2017 10:00 AM ET Source